web analytics

Some advice for Actors Equity

Written By: - Date published: 11:45 am, October 2nd, 2010 - 32 comments
Categories: Media, Unions - Tags:

It seems now that Peter Jackson is refusing to talk to Actors’ Equity because it would affect the whole industry.

Frankly it’s starting to look like one excuse after another – a pattern of hit and run anti-negotiation tactics that anyone with experience in industrial relations since the 1990s will find very familiar.

When I look at the way this is playing out I suspect that Jackson (or whoever is running the show from the producers’ side) has engaged some sharp operators to run this dispute.

The playbook is an old one but one that is tried and true:

1. Find a way to demonise the union as an interfering third party (in this case bullyboy Aussie outsiders)

This is an essential story to set up from the start because it takes the public focus away from the the workers involved – a move that makes it hard to humanise the dispute and misdirects from the main point of the dispute (in this case the workers’ desire for minimum standards)

2. Claim the union has no mandate (in this case claiming it has no legal right to bargain and low membership)

This continues the outsider narrative and drives a wedge between union and non-union workers.

3. Threaten capital flight.

This pushes the wedge between union and non-union workers deeper and, in the case of a national industry, helps set the public against the union.

4. Keep moving the goalposts.

The news cycle is fast and shallow. If you can keep setting up new stories with different anti-union angles you force your opponents to be constantly reactive which drains their resources and keeps them on the back foot. It also works to keep the focus away from the the core dispute.

5. Play to your strengths (in this case the saint-like reputation Peter Jackson has)

I think it’s interesting to see Jackson has not appeared on radio or TV or, as far as I can tell, spoken directly to journalists at all. I suspect this is because his handlers have decided he would not be sympathetic talent in the flesh.

6. Get it over and done with as quickly as possible.

It’s hard to sustain the moral high ground for long with spin, over time the facts start to catch up and public opinion turns against you.

So what can the union do to battle this?

1. Get your facts straight and find a clear way to express the core dispute in a single sentence.

The key claim seems to be minimum standards – every comment the producers make is aimed at shifting the focus away from this basic fair claim. Every comment the union makes should push to return to it.

2. Be proactive with the media.

Answer all calls asap, ring journalists who repeat pro-employer lines and have a chat about what the facts are and why the employer lines are misleading.

3. Write a simple, short factsheet.

This will help you focus your argument and provide you with a resource to take to the public and the media.

4. Do as much broadcast media as possible.

Right now Jackson and the producers seem extremely unwilling to front directly to the media. This is probably because they don’t want to risk going off script. The union should take advantage of this to fill that space. Especially given the fact they already know how to do well in front of a camera.

5. Don’t forget about social media.

Facebook, blogs, msm comment sites are all increasingly influential. Given this dispute involves union members in the film industry a short youtube video explaining the core dispute would be a good idea. Releasing it to the blogs would help it go viral. You may also want to talk to people with online influence who should be natural allies such as Russell Brown.

6. Use real stories

The employer has an incentive to make this about anything other than the core conditions. Gather a few stories from your members about exactly how bad conditions are and start telling them. It helps humanise the issue and brings the focus back on the need for minimum standards.

7. Talk to the CTU.

Actors Equity may be doing this already but if they’re not they need to realise there is a pool of people in the wider NZ union movement that have a lot of experience in dealing with this kind of union-busting. There’s no need for AE to reinvent the wheel.

8. Shore up your members and talk to non-members as much as possible.

It is extremely disheartening for union members to see story after story attacking them and even worse when non-union members who are scared by the employers’ spin also attack them. Most union members are just ordinary people trying to get a fair deal and will be feeling very vulnerable right now.

9. Don’t lose heart.

The longer this goes on the harder it is for the employer to spin it. As more of the facts enter the public sphere most Kiwis will support the actors – we’re a nation with a strong sense of fairness.

Terms and conditions in the film industry have been pretty bad for a long time now and a set of minimum employment standards would be a bloody good and perfectly reasonable idea (and I’m not talking about the unenforceable “guidelines” of the pink and blue books).

But if the current dispute is lost it will take a very long time to build up momentum to have another go. That’s what the industry employers are banking on and there are serious dollars at stake. That’s why they’re playing this one for keeps.

As an aside, I’ve got a few ideas about who the hobbit producers are using as advisers in this dispute but if anyone out there knows they should feel free to mention it in the comments.

32 comments on “Some advice for Actors Equity ”

  1. Terms and conditions in the film industry have been pretty bad for a long time now

    Many would beg to differ and that would also depend on which film industry you compare to.

    I’m sure our actors are way better off than those in Eastern Europe, Nigeria And Bollywood.

    The key claim seems to be minimum standards

    Dunno eh ?…For all the hype and drama, this seems mostly about actors wanting profit shares if the movie blows up.

    So are these minimum standards then the bottom line to be applied across the board for all productions including the low budget local ones or applied only when there’s a big production to gouge a lil’ more dosh out of ?

    • IrishBill 1.1

      I’m aware some people do quite well out of the film industry but a lot don’t. I think minimum stands would go some way to addressing this disparity.

      If better off than third world nations is your standard could I suggest you get a little more ambitious for New Zealand?

      • pollywog 1.1.1

        I think that for those who don’t do well out of the film industry is not so much to do with the film industry, but themselves.

        I’ve got my own personal set of minimum standards i weigh up, trade off and ultimately decide whether the project is something i want to do and something that’s worth my time and energy to put into. Rarely is it about money and what i can get out the back end of it.

        I’m all about the art mate and i dont do shit gigs either 🙂

        hmmmm ambitiousness…how about just trying to stay ahead of third world status ?

      • prism 1.1.2

        Peter Jackson did get ambitious for New Zealand and succeeded financially and critically we mustn’t forget that. And his ambitious New Zealand ideas have led to further film-related businesses and work in New Zealand, and capital investment here.
        All good stuff – someone creating a different business for NZ, not just buying up existing businesses and selling off their assets as so many of our wealthy men have accumulated money from.

      • Nick K 1.1.3

        All of your arguments are invalid because cast and most crew are independent contractors so there is no employer.

        • Craig Glen Eden 1.1.3.1

          Thats the point Nick K they are not independent contractors. This industry has been using the independent contractors mechanism to keep wages down and to be able to fire at will for years.

          Do you really not understand that or do you just think the workers should just get enough so they can survive until the next little job comes along.

          • james 1.1.3.1.1

            the actors themselves are choosing to class themselves as independant contractors rather than employees. hence, for them to attempt to collectively bargain for minimum terms is illegal.

  2. Rharn 2

    Yea got some ideas on this myself. Funny how the ‘right’ does not complains about Australian based PR spin merchants getting involved in our politics.

    • Anne 2.1

      “… got a few ideas about who the hobbit producers are using as advisers in this dispute”.

      Crosby/Textor? First thing that came into my head 😉

      Anti-spam: LIKELY

  3. ianmac 3

    Last night, John Cambell asked the two women from Actors Equity exactly what was it that they wanted. To me their answer was pretty hard to understand. It wasn’t about money they said. It was about conditions. What conditions? I am not quite sure what they want. Perhaps someone else cleverer than me, understands.

    • gingercrush 3.1

      I didn’t watch John Campbell but did watch The Nation today and they are rather incoherent and its been problematic all week. They really need a clear communication strategy.

    • IrishBill 3.2

      I agree, they need to do better than that. Especially as they’re up against some serious pros. That’s what this post is about.

    • Swampy 3.3

      They want a collective contract as per section 33 of the Employment Relations Act, the absolute right for a union to demand a collective contract, and one which has caused a lot of industrial unrest since 2005.

      Now you know, history repeats itself. If the unions keep shooting themselves in the foot with this kind of demands through this clause, then the government might just change it back again to the original 1999 enactment.

      • IrishBill 3.3.1

        So that’s your argument – suck it up or we’ll hurt you more? That’s extremely short sighted when the boot may well be on the other foot at any time. And indeed the boot seems to be on the other foot in terms of the boycott.

  4. prism 4

    Union wages and conditions negotiations –
    10 Talk to your target employer if and when he/she wishes with the object of firmly putting a cogent case for the conditions you wish and enumerating the positive benefits of these, limiting negative talk to a minimum.

    • IrishBill 4.1

      That’s for when you get to the bargaining table. What AE has been confronted with here is a concerted and well-planned campaign by the employer to stop that happening.

  5. Dan 5

    Lorraine Rowlands at Massey University did an interesting study last year of life for the freelance film person in New Zealand. I think it explains their insecurity very well.

    muir.massey.ac.nz/bitstream/10179/1083/2/01front.pdf

  6. salsy 6

    So how exactly is forcing Peter Jackson to not only unionise the NZ film Industry, but then singlehandedly and without consultation set the terms and conditions to rest of New Zealand be deemed fair, ethical or even democratic? How can this be fair on a grass roots and largely independent industry? How can it be fair even to actors/crew who will no longer be able to be hired on local indies – dont forget these make up the bulk of our industry? How can it be fair to the guy (next door) who is mortgaging his house to fund a feature? How can this be fair on an industry trying to remain attractive to hollywood despite a high dollar and lack of tax incentives?

    Im not convinced. Why would we risk it all on a set of demands that dont even seem to really exist? When money and condititions apparently arent even an issue? Should we not be thinking about the greater good here? Or are we too hogtied and blinded by ideology to protect the future of this industry, its jobs and competitiveness? We might get called Mexicans with cellphones, but I for one would rather be that, than unemployed living in the Detroit of the film world.

    • Colonial Viper 6.1

      Or are we too hogtied and blinded by ideology to protect the future of this industry, its jobs and competitiveness?

      Minimum employment rights and conditions aren’t much too ask for though, right?

      How can this be fair on a grass roots and largely independent industry?

      I think you’ve forgotten that the ‘grass roots’ are the ordinary workers and actors in this industry who deserve minimum employment rights and conditions.

  7. smhead 7

    Good strategic advice Irish.

    Actors Equity haven’t done themselves a whole lot of favours.

    1. The first thing AE should do is ensure that actors have a registered union.

    2. Then take on a number of cases in the ERA of actors as independent contractors, to try and have them declared as employees under the ERA. It worked in Bryson and Three Foot Six in the ERA five years ago, and there are many other cases depending on the individual circumstances that will give the NZ film industry, particularly SPP a real fright http://www.ers.dol.govt.nz/law/case/themes/jul-05.html

    3. Then for those actors not deemed employees but remain as independent contractors, form a single company owned by AE members to negotiate a contract agreement with minimum standards Jackson and SPP, through which AE members would be employees of the AE company. As long as they are a single company, rather than individual companies colluding with each other to price, they aren’t in breach of the Commerce Act.

  8. Colonial Viper 8

    The NZ Herald has a pretty interesting interview with Ian Mune about the dispute. A common sense interpretation at last, without all the highly paid PR spin.

    http://msn.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10677637

  9. Tiger Mountain 9

    Agree with article, hopefully NZCTU and other unions can help inject some better management of this dispute.

    Facebook is looking pretty ugly particularly http://www.facebook.com/hobbitnz (aka Keep the Hobbit flim shoot in NZ). One particular dickhead is calling for burning effigies of Jennifer Ward Lealand and another calls AE members “stalkers, and paid for commenting on blogs and FaceBook” in favour of Equity. Various others trumpet their willingness to work for free on the Hobbit. Vile stuff. Standard readers supportive of Irish Bill’s comments could consider helping out the handfull of Equity members battling the ignorant hordes on FB.

    This industry looks like a rabble quite frankly at the moment, with division between Auckland Wellington, Actors and technicians, all workers and producers, producers and directors.

  10. john 10

    Once released the Hobbit will make huge profits guaranteed. Jackson must negotiate so that the actors and other workers get decent standards and income, a Union is a must in this process : It seems to be a human failing not just the rich (Though they’re the worst,the more you have the more you deserve) that we will never cough up money for others more than necessary(Kiwis are generous to charities) unless they get an arm lock on us!

  11. Joe Bloggs 11

    The union’s playbook – an old one but one that is tried and true (and full of the same tired memes):
    1. Find a way to demonise the producers as greedy corporates, and rich capitalist pigs who have ridden to wealth over the backs of the downtrodden working class

    This is an essential story to set up from the start because it takes the public focus away from the economic benefit that the producers have created – a move that makes it hard to humanise the dispute and misdirects from the main point of the dispute (in this case the interference by an unregistered organisation from another country)

    2. Claim the producers have no ethics (in this case claiming they are working to exploit the poor downtrodden workers)

    This continues the outsider narrative and drives a wedge between producers and public

    3. Threaten strike action.

    This pushes the wedge between producers and New Zealand deeper and, in the case of a National led government, helps the opposition cry foul over National Labour laws.

    4. Keep moving the goalposts.

    The news cycle is fast and shallow. If you can keep setting up new stories with different anti-producer and anti-Jackson angles you force your opponents to be constantly reactive which drains their resources and keeps them on the back foot. It also works to keep the focus away from the core dispute.

    5. Play to your strengths (in this case play the tall poppy card against Peter Jackson)

    I think it’s interesting to see Jackson has not appeared on radio or TV or, as far as I can tell, spoken directly to journalists at all. I suspect this is because his handlers have decided he would not be sympathetic talent in the flesh. Of course he’s a successful man which makes him a doubly attractive target of smears and innuendo.

    6. Get it over and done with as quickly as possible.

    It’s hard to sustain the moral high ground for long with spin, over time the facts start to catch up and public opinion turns against you.

    See anyone can write this sort of crap…

    • IrishBill 11.1

      I’m flattered you’re so upset by my post that you’d respond like this. Thank you.

      • Joe Bloggs 11.1.1

        enjoy that warm moist feeling while it lasts you delusional prat

        • IrishBill 11.1.1.1

          I’d usually ban you for that but watching you get all angry and frustrated is just too damn entertaining.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • The legal and constitutional implications of New Zealand’s fight against COVID
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • “THE LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ZEALAND’S FIGHT AGAINST COVID.”
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Pharmac Review interim report released
    Health Minister Andrew Little has released an interim report by an independent panel reviewing the national pharmaceuticals-buying agency Pharmac. Pharmac was established in 1993 and is responsible for purchasing publicly funded medicines for New Zealanders, including those prescribed by GPs or administered in hospitals. The review, chaired by former Consumer ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Appointment to Network for Learning board
    Former MP Clare Curran has been appointed to the board of Crown company Network for Learning (N4L), Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. Hon Clare Curran served as a Member of Parliament for Dunedin South from 2008-2010. During this time, she held a number of ministerial portfolios including Broadcasting, Communications and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Putting home ownership within reach of Pacific Aotearoa
    Pacific community groups and organisations will get tools to help them achieve home ownership with the implementation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP) Pacific Housing Initiative, said Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. In July 2021, MPP launched the Pacific Community Housing Provider Registration Support programme and the Pacific ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Coastal shipping will help keep New Zealand’s supply chain buoyant
    Transport Minister Michael Wood today welcomed the release of the Coastal Shipping Investment Approach State-of-Play report as an important step towards a more sustainable coastal shipping sector, which will further diversify New Zealand’s supply chain. “This Government is committed to strengthening our domestic supply chain by making coastal shipping a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Response to Human Rights Commission's reports into violence towards disable people
    Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.   Thank you for that introduction Hemi and thank you for inviting me to respond on behalf of Government to the release of these two important reports (Whakamanahia Te Tiriti, Whakahaumarutia te Tangata -Honour the Treaty, Protect the Person and Whakamahia te Tūkino kore ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Law change strengthens petroleum decommissioning regulation
    Petroleum permit and licence holders operating in New Zealand will now have an explicit statutory requirement to carry out and fund the decommissioning of oil and gas fields after a new law was given Royal assent today, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. Once in effect The Crown ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • New Zealand Response to assist peace and stability in Solomon Islands
    The New Zealand government has announced that it will deploy Defence Force and Police personnel to Honiara to help restore peace and stability. “New Zealand is committed to its responsibilities and playing its part in upholding regional security,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  “We are deeply concerned by the recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Continued growth in volume of new home consents
    In the year ended October 2021, 47,715 new homes were consented, up 26 per cent from the October 2020 year. In October 2021, 4,043 new dwellings were consented Canterbury’s new homes consented numbers rose 31% to higher than post-earthquake peak. New home consents continue to reach remarkable levels of growth, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Saddle up for summer with cycle trail funding
    New investment will keep the best of New Zealand’s cycle trails in top condition as regions prepare to welcome back Kiwi visitors over summer and international tourists from next year. “Cycle tourism is one of the most popular ways to see the country ‘off the beaten track’ but the trails ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand provides additional funding to COVAX for vaccine delivery
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced additional funding will be provided to COVAX to support vaccine delivery in developing countries. “New Zealand remains cognisant of the dangers of COVID-19, especially as new variants continue to emerge. No one is safe from this virus until we all are and this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • COVID-19 Community fund providing support for 160 organisations focused on women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced financial support will be allocated to the 160 successful applicants for the COVID-19 Community Fund, to support organisations helping women/wāhine and girls/kōtiro in Aotearoa New Zealand affected by the pandemic. “COVID-19 has had a disproportionate effect on women around the world including in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government delivers reactivation package as Aucklanders reconnect for summer
    A new support package will help revive economic, social and cultural activities in our largest city over summer, and ensure those in hardship also get relief. The Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni and the Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash have announced a Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Mobile services and broadband come to Chatham Islands for first time
    World class mobile and broadband services have been switched on for the 663 residents of the Chatham Islands, Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications, David Clark and Minister for Economic and Regional Development, Stuart Nash announced today. “This eagerly awaited network will provide fast broadband and mobile services to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Crown accounts reflect strong economy amid pandemic
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect an economy that has performed better than expected, despite the latest Delta COVID-19 outbreak. The Crown accounts for the four months to the end of October factors in the improved starting position for the new financial year. Core Crown tax revenue was $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Applications open for new 2021 Resident Visa
    The first round of applications for New Zealand’s new 2021 Resident visa open today (6am). “This one-off pathway provides certainty for a great many migrant families who have faced disruption because of COVID-19 and it will help retain the skills New Zealand businesses need to support the economic recovery,” Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More Vietnam Veterans to receive compensation for Agent Orange Exposure
    Minister for Veterans, the Hon Meka Whaitiri announced today that two new conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure have been added to the Prescribed Conditions List. Under the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Crown and representatives of Vietnam veterans and the Royal New Zealand RSA. Vietnam veterans in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government commits to international effort to ban and regulate killer robots
    Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control Phil Twyford announced today that New Zealand will push for new international law to ban and regulate autonomous weapons systems (AWS), which once activated can select and engage targets without further human intervention. “While the evidence suggests fully autonomous weapons systems are not yet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New freedom camping rules – right vehicle, right place
    Tougher freedom camping laws will be introduced to prevent abuse which has placed an unfair burden on small communities and damaged our reputation as a high quality visitor destination. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has confirmed that new legislation will be introduced to Parliament following an extensive round of public consultation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government invests to support a classic Kiwi summer
    Vaccinated New Zealanders can look forward to Kiwi summer events with confidence, while artists and crew will have more certainty, following the launch of details of the Arts and Culture Event Support Scheme, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “The Government recognises that the arts and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Grace period for expired driver licences cruises into 2022
    Due to the ongoing Delta outbreak and extended lockdowns, all New Zealand driver licences and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will now be valid until 31 May 2022, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “This further extension to the validity of driver licenses recognises that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Delivered: 1,000 extra transitional homes
    A further 1,000 transitional homes delivered  New housing development starts in Flaxmere, Hastings  The Government has delivered the next 1,000 transitional housing places it promised, as part of its work to reduce homelessness. Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods is marking the milestone in Hastings at a new development that includes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Traffic light levels announced
    The levels at which different parts of New Zealand will move forward into the COVID-19 Protection Framework this Friday have been announced. Northland, Auckland, Taupō and Rotorua Lakes Districts, Kawerau, Whakatane, Ōpōtiki Districts, Gisborne District, Wairoa District, Rangitikei, Whanganui and Ruapehu Districts will move in at Red The rest of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Financial support to move to traffic light system
    A new transition payment will be made available particularly for affected businesses in Auckland, Waikato and Northland to acknowledge the restrictions they have faced under the higher Alert Levels. Transition payment of up to $24,000 as businesses move into traffic light system Leave Support Scheme and Short Term Absence Payment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Ambassador to Russia announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Sarah Walsh as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Russia. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Russia have a long-standing relationship, engaging on a range of regional and global interests including disarmament and Antarctica issues. We also work together as members of the East ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Permanent Representative to the UN announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Carolyn Schwalger as Permanent Representative to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. “Aotearoa New Zealand is a founding member of the UN and we have worked hard to ensure our stance on human rights, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Further COVID-19 economic support for Cook Islands and Fiji announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced a further package of support for the Cook Islands and Fiji for COVID-19 economic support and recovery. “Aotearoa New Zealand remains committed to supporting our Pacific fanau and vuvale to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on their economies, and move towards long-term ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New law will clear the air for tamariki in vehicles
    From today, it’s illegal to smoke or vape in most vehicles carrying children aged under 18 years old - whether the vehicle is moving or not. “Second-hand smoke poses an unacceptable risk to our tamariki and rangatahi,” Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall said. “We know children in vehicles ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Nine countries designated very high risk
    Nine southern African countries are being added to the very high risk countries list following public health advice around the newly discovered COVID-19 variant Omicron, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said. This afternoon, a public health risk assessment was carried out to assess the emerging evidence and any risk to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Foreign Affairs Minister concludes final stage of world trip
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today departed North America to return home to Aotearoa, concluding the last stage of her 17-day world trip. The final leg of her trip saw her visit the United States of America and Canada for a number of high-level discussions. While in Washington D.C., ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Milestone launch of Pacific Languages Unit
    Today’s official launch of the Pacific Languages Unit is a milestone for our Pacific communities, the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio said. The Pacific Languages Unit brings together a new set of language supports within the Ministry for Pacific Peoples to provide advice, commission research, maintain standards, promote ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Public Health Lecture – University of Otago
    Public Health - Lessons from New Zealand’s COVID-19 response and opportunities for the future E nga mana, E nga reo,                                          E nga iwi. Tēna koutou katoa. Ka huri ki nga mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēna koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand statement on situation in Honiara, Solomon Islands
    Aotearoa New Zealand is deeply concerned by the events which have been unfolding in Honiara, Solomon Islands, since Wednesday. “New Zealand is a long-standing partner of Solomon Islands, and there are deep and enduring connections between our two countries,” Acting Foreign Affairs Minister David Parker said. “Our engagement in Solomon ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Nailed it! Over 500 apprentices get jobs boost
    Over 500 apprentices and cadets have been placed into work across New Zealand thanks to the Government’s booming build programme, that’s both constructing public houses, and maintaining older homes. Housing Minister Megan Woods announced the milestone today at a public housing construction site in Riccarton, Christchurch. “This Government’s investment in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Investment to support maternal mental health
    Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced an investment to help expand maternal mental health services in five District Health Boards. “Supporting parent’s mental wellbeing during their child’s first 1000 days, from conception to two years of age, is critical to the long-term emotional, mental and physical wellbeing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Workplace vaccination requirements extended to cover Police and NZ Defence Force
    With the support of the organisations, additional vaccination requirements will cover sworn members, recruits and authorised officers of the New Zealand Police, and all New Zealand Defence Force staff. First doses of the vaccine for workers in these organisations are required by 17 January 2022, and second doses by 1 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Aotearoa New Zealand and Canada to pursue greater Indigenous collaboration
    During her visit to Ottawa, the Honourable Nanaia Mahuta, New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs and Associate Minister for Māori Development, met with the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Canadian Minister of Indigenous Services, and the Honourable Marc Miller, Canadian Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, to further expand and develop the positive relationship ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Māori vaccination rates reach 80% first dose
    Associate Minister of Health (Māori) Hon Peeni Henare today confirmed that Māori across the motu have now reached 80 percent for first doses of the COVID-19 vaccination nationally. “We have seen a huge increase in vaccinations for Māori throughout November, since the beginning of the month the increase for first ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Subsequent Children legislation to change
    The Government has today introduced legislation that will reverse provisions in the Oranga Tamariki Act as part of a path to rebuild trust and confidence in the organisation. “The Oranga Tamariki Amendment Bill makes a number of changes but by far the most important is the partial repeal of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago