web analytics

Spying on China

Written By: - Date published: 8:37 am, April 19th, 2015 - 100 comments
Categories: China, Spying - Tags: , ,

The latest in the Snowden / GCSB spying leaks, as emerging in The Herald:

Leaked papers reveal NZ plan to spy on China for US

Our spies and America’s top government hackers cooked up a plan to crack into a data link between Chinese Government buildings in Auckland, new Edward Snowden documents reveal.

The project appeared aimed at tapping data flowing between the Chinese consulate and its passport office in Great South Rd — and using the link to access China’s computer systems.

One of the source documents included appears to show that “Phase 1” was completed.

In the case of spying on Korea Key claimed that they wouldn’t care:

Mr Key says the Koreans simply do not care, “because they wouldn’t give a monkey’s and they probably wouldn’t believe it”.

He can’t play that nonsense card in the case of China – from the Herald piece again:

The revelation is the most explosive of the information about New Zealand revealed in the Snowden documents — and has sparked a firm Chinese diplomatic response giving rise to concerns our security relationship with the United States is impacting our trade relationship with China.

A Chinese Embassy spokesman told the Herald on Sunday: “China is concerned about relevant report. We attach great importance to the cybersecurity issue.

See further analysis from Hager and Gallagher.

So, great, now we can add China to the growing list of countries that are pissed off with us. What could possibly go wrong?

100 comments on “Spying on China ”

  1. Paul 1

    What a bunch of incompetent clowns.
    Pity we didn’t fire the lot of them in 2014.

    Actually pity they were ever hired.

    Wake up New Zealand these guys do NOT care about you.

  2. ianmac 2

    Whilst the GCSB is not we are told, spying in NZ what is there to stop other 5Eyes from spying on us and in return we spy on them then swap information gleaned. That way the PM can say hand on heart that the GCSB is not spying on NZers. Simple.
    The Chinese might retaliate with Trade sanctions. The dairy industry might be concerned?

    • Paul 2.1

      There is clearly a lot of milk about. They could easily buy elsewhere.
      Maybe some National supporting farmers might start to realise that this government does not put their interests as high as they say they do.

      Key worked for Merrill Lynch and big US banking interests.
      He still does.

      • Draco T Bastard 2.1.1

        There is clearly a lot of milk about. They could easily buy elsewhere.

        Give the Chinese time and they’ll outstrip us in milk production and export as well. Same as the US is doing already (I really have NFI why people think that the US is ever going to be a market for our agricultural produce). Agriculture is not how you develop a nations economy.

    • weka 2.2

      trade sanctions on milk exports is probably one of the better things that could happen at this point.

  3. Penny Bright 3

    How is it LAWFUL for the GCSB be involved in the alleged planned spying on Chinese Consulate diplomatic communications?

    How ‘two-faced’ is ex-Wall Street banker, ‘smiling assassin’ NZ Prime Minister John Key?

    Whose interests was / is NZ Prime Minister John Key serving, as the (then) Minister responsible for the GCSB, in the alleged planned spying on China – NZ’s major trading partner?

    The New Zealand public or U$A corporate interests?

    Surely the issue is not (again) HOW these leaked documents were obtained – but whether or not they are FACTUALLY ACCURATE??

    Penny Bright

    http://www.pennybright4mayor.org.nz

    • Paul 3.1

      Penny, it is clear that Key still works for Wall Street.

      • Murray Simmonds 3.1.1

        In answer to the concluding sentence in Anthony Robins’ post:
        ” What could possibly go wrong? ”

        Well the worst thing that could possibly go wrong is that this bunch of diplomatically dense, myopic clowns (who kid themselves that they are successfully running to country according to plan) could get re-elected for yet another term if we are not careful . . . .

        And ‘according to plan’ in the above statement of course means “according to Uncle Sam’s plan”.

      • mary_a 3.1.2

        @ Paul (3.1) Yes, Wall Street. And Washington. One and the same? Possibly.

        Doesn’t matter because one thing is definite, Key does NOT work in the best interests of NZ and Kiwis!

        Key’s spying activities on amiable nations, is not keeping us on an even keel throughout the international community. When more of this leaks out and becomes common knowledge, NZ will find itself under suspicion and isolated. And Key will be gone, lucratively paid off for his treason towards his homeland.

        Key is more of a threat to NZ than any outside terrorist could ever be.

        Wake up Kiwis!

        • Draco T Bastard 3.1.2.1

          Key is more of a threat to NZ than any outside terrorist could ever be.

          QFT

          And that also includes the entire National Party as they support their leader.

  4. david 4

    The government has plenty of ways to duck out of this: say they can’t remember; blame it on out of control bureaucrats; launch an enquiry; or blame it on the Greens.

    • BassGuy 4.1

      Don’t forget “Labour did it, too!”

    • mickysavage 4.2

      I don’t think they can claim they did not know. Section 8B of the GCSB Act says:

      8B Intelligence gathering and analysis
      (1) This function of the Bureau is—
      (a) to gather and analyse intelligence (including from information infrastructures) in accordance with the Government’s requirements about the capabilities, intentions, and activities of foreign persons and foreign organisations; and
      (b) to gather and analyse intelligence about information infrastructures; and
      (c) to provide any intelligence gathered and any analysis of the intelligence to—
      (i) the Minister …

      Presuming intelligence was collected Key must have been told.

      http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2003/0009/latest/DLM5647924.html

      • dukeofurl 4.2.1

        As well the PM ( or minister) has legal authority to know operational matters for GCSB that isnt normally available for routine government departments.

        I can imagine the chinese having taken particular care over the coms between the two different buildings.
        The consulate is a building on its own site, which I presume they would own, while the visa office is down the road in an office park.
        Maybe they had noticed the attempted intrusion and could rely on line of sight comms from then on.

  5. ianmac 5

    Note that the Herald has slipped the online story down the page to be sandwiched between a story about heavy rain and one about a cricketer taking his kids to a takeway. Priorities?

    • dukeofurl 5.1

      Thats what happens automatically on online versions.
      It may have different stories up top depending on your history or if you have looked at the story in question

      • Lanthanide 5.1.1

        Yes, but they can also choose to promote a story to the top. Clearly they have not chosen to do that in this case.

  6. Sanctuary 6

    The essential contradiction of NZ foreign policy is it’s desire to trade with Chinabut fight with America. We just about manage to pull it off, but when a sycophantically pro-American like Key is in charge the balance is lost.

    Wait for an obscure change in health regulations leaving tons of our exports on their wharves while China “apologetically” tries to work it through with our officials.

  7. saveNZ 7

    It’s pretty simple to see NZ government has put NZ into an extremely dangerous position.

    They are absolute MORONS. I mean we already knew that but it keeps getting worse.

    They seem incapable of saying NO to either US or China and therefore endangering the relationship with both and screwing our country up permanently. They also are in breach of international law, good will etc.

    Somehow we are now owned or indebted to, two rival superpowers both internally and externally.

    Will this nightmare government ever end?

    If they just have one pinch of common sense and spine to do what is right morally and for the people of this country they would not have got caught up with illegal spying for the US or selling our country off to non resident foreign owners and would not have put NZ in this position.

  8. Colonial Rawshark 8

    There’s no problem, I think someone’s knighthood is now pretty secure.

  9. adam 9

    Dear Chinese government,

    The New Zealand government is a nasty, vindictive, amoral piece of work. They worship at the alter of cupidity, and are sycophants to wall street, all. It is doubtful these epigone to Washington could organise a piss up in a brewery – just look at our economy.

    Our Prime Minister is a hubristic fool, prone to vainglorious moments – on a much too regular basis. This is the opprobrium of being closely associated with gangsters, like the USA corporations.

    That said, I think you understand, we the people who live here, are really not responsible. We had a lot of propaganda, and indeed some real dirty politics so these politicians could stay in power. Maybe that the real problem – we the people don’t run our country. Because if we did – we would not bother spying on you – that would be to much effort.

    So please, please, please don’t stop sending the flat screens. We won’t question the daily suicides in your factories again. And please, most of all, just remember when you play games of state – you will always get people like, John Key.

    • Bill 9.1

      Excellent! 🙂

    • Tracey 9.2

      china are not saints. their wealthy are getting wealthy on the back of human rights abuses and exploiting working conditions. i get what you are saying but like attracts like. keys ethics are mirrored in who he grovels to. the dollar. no matter how bloodstained it is. he insulated himself from it by getting someone else to clean it off before he pockets it.

    • Once was+Tim 9.3

      PS Dear China,
      Do you mind if we adopt your solution to the problem of corrupt politicians and officials?

    • cogito 9.4

      🙂 🙂

      But, personally, I have no time at all for the Chinese, their corrupt communist dictatorship, their repression of the Hong Kong democratic movement, their abysmal record on human rights, their criminal drug activities in NZ, their financial invasion of NZ land, properties and businesses…. As for their flat screen tvs – they can keep them.

      • Once was Tim 9.4.1

        Agreed. But can we import the firing squads for corrupt officials and politicians? They’ll be a lot more ‘seemly’ and less upsetting for the littluns than corpses hanging from lamposts when the inevitable happens if we continue to persue the direction we’re heading. We seem to have lost the ‘learnings’ from history, and even ‘understandings’ of basic mathematics (the 99% up against the 1).
        (Like those pesky split hairs and the Pantene solution – it won’t happen overnight, but it WILL happen – royalties to Rod’s ex; GST to IRD)

    • Draco T Bastard 9.5

      That said, I think you understand, we the people who live here, are really not responsible.

      Actually, we are because we voted the fuckers in. What you say here is a good example of the disassociation that comes with Representative Democracy. It allows people to say the government did this, the government did that and it’s not what I wanted thus it’s not my responsibility. This is complete bollocks. We are the government and parliament is working for us and if it’s not doing what we want then we need to get rid of it.

      Personally, I think we need to change the system because of the faults that it has. It really is more of an elected dictatorship than democracy and it was purposefully set up that way so as to prevent the people actually governing themselves.

      • Once was Tim 9.5.1

        …..”It really is more of an elected dictatorship than democracy…”
        ain’t that the truth!. I think there’s been a sort of cultural shift (part of the I I I me me me culture in fact) where the winner takes all.
        MMP went part of the way to fixing the FPP fuckup but many still think in FPP terms.
        As Kelsey noted in one of her early books, at least MMP reigned in treasury to a degree because they found themselves having to negotiate and compromise a little. That’s not to say they haven’t now figured out other ways of pushing their barrow.
        How can we fix this ‘elected dictatorship’? – I’d be interested in your thoughts @DracotBastard (knowing of course you’re a hard left wing kinsprissy thereist pink commie bastard).
        I’d like to see some sort of upper house or mechanism providing the powers of veto (such as a ‘senate’ for want of a better word, that’s comprised of elected local/regional council reps) – at least some means of localising/regionalising reps….. along with things such as term limits, and as someone in here once suggested – a 3 year time limit on any legislation passed under urgency.

        • Draco T Bastard 9.5.1.1

          How can we fix this ‘elected dictatorship’?

          Progressively shift to a more referendum driven policy development and passage. That will, IMO, require online voting and a reduction in working hours from our excessively high working week.

          I’d like to see some sort of upper house or mechanism providing the powers of veto (such as a ‘senate’ for want of a better word, that’s comprised of elected local/regional council reps)

          The US and the UK have one of those. It hasn’t made anything better. When both houses are dominated by the same parties then the upper house merely becomes a rubber stamp and when the houses oppose each other the upper house becomes a restriction preventing law changes no matter how necessary.

  10. Murray Simmonds 10

    ‘. . . .desire to trade with China but fight with America.”

    Unfortunately its not just “fight with America”. Its also bend over backwards to meet their every whim and desire.

    The Pan Pacific Trade agreement shows just how determined the big USA corporates and multinationals are to dominate global market share at all costs.

    Including in our case the cost of our sovereignty and our right to determine our own economic direction in the world.

    And this idiot government just can’t wait to sign us up to it.

  11. Colonial Rawshark 11

    Listen to this useless so-called academic from Victoria University in the Herald article. Apparently policy making is not an area of government which is helped by “public scrutiny”:

    Victoria University’s Dr Jim Rolfe, director of its Centre for Security Studies, said there were areas of government which were not helped by public scrutiny.

    He said the Snowden revelations had produced benefits in revealing over-reach in some intelligence operations, although “90 per cent of it is prurient”.

    “I suspect things have been hurt rather than helped by Snowden because it has distracted policy makers from their work.”

    I’d like Jim Rolfe to come forward and point to the 90% of Snowden’s revelations which are “prurient.” What a dick. Sounds like he has been too closely linked to the establishment for far too long. Especially considering that the Snowden relevations have been very carefully selected and reported on by Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian, the New York Times, the Washington Post and other leading media exactly for their relevance to democracy and accountability (or the lack of it) behind the activities and technologies of our spy services. But lets worry more about his high up unaccountable policy maker friends being “distracted” by Snowden’s revelations.

    The irony is that it was the deep state PR machine which put out all the stories out there about Snowden being “attention seeking”, “narcissistic”, a “high school drop out”, having failed his military training etc. Now that was really “prurient.” Didn’t see him criticising the establishment PR though.

    • Tracey 11.1

      he means most people are too dumb to cope with knowledge. a few selected bright sparks, like him for example, know what is best for us lower beings. k?

      • Colonial Rawshark 11.1.1

        So much for our academic institutions highlighting abuses of power and holding the establishment to account.

        • Bill 11.1.1.1

          Outside of a short time around the 60s, when did they as institutions ‘highlight abuses of power’ or ‘hold the establishment to account’? They are the establishment.

          Whenever I think of ‘academic institutions’ I remember my grandfather telling me that it was university students who ran the trams during the 1926 General Strike. And then I reflect that those ‘academic institutions’ are becoming more and more the preserve of the monied and privileged these days…conservative and reactionary…at least in NZ.

          • Tracey 11.1.1.1.1

            you mean like professor jane kelsey

            canty students mobilising post quake. i dont recall vice chancellors ever speaking except to want more money that they had already spent… academics always spoke out tho… less now than then but they do speak out

            • Colonial Rawshark 11.1.1.1.1.1

              She’s literally a one in a thousand out of all the PhD types that the state employs, and you know it.

              • Murray Rawshark

                Hey. I’m a PhD type employed by the (Australian) state. I speak out, but quantum physics doesn’t have as much relevance as Jane’s work. I do suspect the Chinese will be moving to quantum cryptography for any diplomatic traffic within Aotearoa though. It’s not only unbreakable, but you know when someone’s tried.

    • dukeofurl 11.2

      This is his bio. Work out if he independent or not ?

      Rolfe has had a career in both the public and university sector. He started his working life in the New Zealand Army, moved to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet as a policy adviser dealing with a range of security issues and completed his PhD while there. He was Deputy Director of the Centre for Security Studies and Associate Director of the Master of International Relations Programme at VUW in the period 1991-2001. Rolfe then moved to the United States as an Associate Professor of International Relations at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies for six years. He returned to the Ministry of Defence where he was Principal Adviser, Strategic Policy for several years and from where he was seconded to the Australian Civil-Military Centre as Deputy Director.

      he may even be a ‘recruiter’ for the security services from amoung the graduate students.

      Its a bit like asking the police Union to comment on some situation- you know the approach they will have

    • Murray Rawshark 11.3

      Dr Jim Rolfe is an ex-Army major who worked with Bananarama in Fiji and has had a position at a security think tank in the US and A. He’s as Kiwi as FJK.

  12. Tracey 12

    we spy on our friends to get a business advantage we spy on our enemies to fuck up our business advantage

  13. The Murphey 13

    Q. Remember the protracted and numerous accusations against Huawei ?

    • Lloyd 13.1

      The irony is that Huawei manufactured exchanges are most likely tapping GCSB and that they are listening to what GCSB has extracted out of the Chinese land-line…….

  14. fisiani 14

    China is spying on NZ. We still trade with China and they with us. Another failed attempt to somehow smear Honest John.

    • Stuart Munro 14.1

      Yup right – it’s pretty hard to further soil the image of an oozy turd like John Key.

    • Colonial Rawshark 14.2

      China is spying on NZ. We still trade with China and they with us. Another failed attempt to somehow smear Honest John.

      So the damage to our (false) position as honest brokers is irrelevant to you? Sad, fisi, just sad.

      • felix 14.2.1

        Guys like Key and even little fisiani don’t really have to get to grips with words like “honest”.

        It’s just a word, like “fact” or “actually” or “reality”, they’re all just words and depending what you use them for they can mean anything really.

        “Honest” might just mean “good at golf” for all we know.

        • Gosman 14.2.1.1

          Why do you think we are some sort of neutral honest broker?

          • felix 14.2.1.1.1

            I didn’t say we were.

            However successive governments of all stripes have talked up our “independent foreign policy” and our international reputation as an “honest broker”.

            You only have to go back as far as the current govt’s statements on our recent appointment to the UNSC to find examples of both.

            As it turns out neither are true as we spy for the U.S. on our friends, neighbours and trading partners around the world.

    • Draco T Bastard 14.3

      Have you actually got proof of that or are you just going with the BS lines from Crosby/Textor/National Party HQ?

    • BassGuy 14.4

      It’s not a smear if he actually was involved in it, now is it?

    • Fran 14.5

      Best satirical comments everytime fisiani. I don’t know why so many people think you are serious, your comments are so out there they must be satire.

    • keyman 14.6

      all these left wing clowns have no idea how the world works ,john key is working for new zealand and all these people want to do is run our great leader down.

    • keyman2 14.7

      china will not care the important thing is John key is out doing it for new Zealand

  15. Penny Bright 15

    NEW ZEALAND PLOTTED HACK ON CHINA WITH NSA

    https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/04/18/new-zealand-china-gcsb-nsa-auckland-hack/

    “New Zealand spies teamed with National Security Agency hackers to break into a data link in the country’s largest city, Auckland, as part of a secret plan to eavesdrop on Chinese diplomats, documents reveal.

    The covert operation, reported Saturday by New Zealand’s Herald on Sunday in collaboration with The Intercept, highlights the contrast between New Zealand’s public and secret approaches to its relationship with China, its largest and most important trading partner.

    The hacking project suggests that New Zealand’s electronic surveillance agency, Government Communications Security Bureau, or GCSB, may have violated international treaties that prohibit the interception of diplomatic communications.

    New Zealand has signed both the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and the 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, international treaties that protect the “inviolability” of diplomatic correspondance. The country’s prime minister, John Key, said in a recent speech on security that New Zealand had an obligation to support the rule of law internationally, and was “known for its integrity, reliability and independence.”
    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    So – how LAWFUL was this planned spying on Chinese diplomats in New Zealand?

    Looks like the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security may have yet ANOTHER ‘inquiry’ on her hands?

    (I know the ‘spin’ will focus on HOW these documents were obtained, rather than their FACTUAL ACCURACY?)

    Penny Bright

    http://www.pennybright4mayor.org.nz

  16. Wayne 16

    Penny,

    You simply have no idea what you are talking about.

    Last time I checked China was a foreign country. And that is what GCSB primarily does, spy on foreign countries. It is specifically what it was set up for.

    China is hardly going to be surprised by this “revelation”, and apart from proforma protest will do nothing.

    • Colonial Rawshark 16.1

      China is hardly going to be surprised by this “revelation”, and apart from proforma protest will do nothing.

      So we recently decide to systematically violate the sanctity of their diplomatic communications on US orders, and despite this change in our posture towards them, China will simply shrug its shoulders? LOL

    • McFlock 16.2

      China might hardly be surprised, but I will hardly be surprised if some of our more perishable exports have “customs misunderstandings” in the next few months.

      Just a little smack to keep us in line.

      • emergency mike 16.2.1

        That was my first thought about this also. Expect a correction to Chinese requirements for NZ imports in the not too distant future.

    • Murray Rawshark 16.3

      Jeez Wayne, can you tell us about the Vienna Conventions on diplomatic communications? It’s also probable that Kiwis applying for visas were being spied on. That’s another breach of our own laws.

      While I’m happy you’re out of parliament, I fear that whoever replaced you probably has the same flexible ethics.

    • Pascals bookie 16.4

      So why bother keeping it all secret then Wayne?

      Actual question there. I mean, what’s the point in keeping it all secret if everyone knows?

  17. McFlock 17

    NZ is a small state geopolitically. We need to straddle the gulf between the larger powers and strengthen inter-governmental diplomatic organisations, not become a client state of one or the other – that weakens our position with both.

    It’s one thing to openly assist the US against 4th parties, but directly and covertly assisting the US (which is possibly entering a decline phase) against another superpower is a bullshit move that would likely have MFaT officials headdesking.

    • cogito 17.1

      As a small state geopolitically, NZ would do well to decide who its friends are and then behave accordingly.

      • McFlock 17.1.1

        States don’t have friends. Just “stateswho aren’t working to attack us”, “states who are probably working towards attacking us”, “states we will protect to serve our own interests while extracting as much as possible from the arrangement”, and “states who are serving their own interests by protecting us while extracting as much as possible from the arrangement”.

        Basically, our objective would be to maintain as much independence as possible, rather than being overcome or ceding our sovreignty to another nation.

        • cogito 17.1.1.1

          “States don’t have friends”

          Yes they do.

          • McFlock 17.1.1.1.1

            Only in the shallowest “nice if I can get something out of it, drop you like a hot potato if you don’t give me a port of convenience for my nuclear-armed vessels” sense of the word.

            The sort of “friendship” one sees between sociopaths or drunk teenagers.

      • Colonial Rawshark 17.1.2

        Then make sure you pick friends which are on the ascendance, not friends whose fortunes are on the wane.

  18. Penny Bright 18

    So you don’t believe in the ‘Rule of Law’ Wayne?

    Penny Bright

    • adam 18.1

      What ‘rule of law ‘Penny?

      Laws, good people don’t need them, and the bad will just break them.

      To many of our so called laws – uphold bad peoples virtues – like the reserve bank act, or that little nugget which brought us the super city.

  19. Sable 19

    Utter bunch of screw ups. Well done Shonkey. Now the country with the fastest economic growth on earth is ticked off with us. Whilst the sad defunct USA with 18 trillion in debt is our friend……Well done…..

  20. keyman 20

    you clowns don’t know what your taking about all countries spy nothing to see here no smoking gun move on

  21. Murray Rawshark 21

    This is the sort of thing that could see China cutting off diplomatic relations. It seems clear that it violates the Vienna conventions. I’d laugh if FJK visited China and got arrested. At least his family could afford to pay for the bullet.
    And Dr. Jim Rolfe seems to be a total moron.

  22. dave 22

    i sort hope china is pissed

  23. infused 23

    You guys should do a little bit of research on China’s spy ops, mainly cyber related.

    All this tells me is you guys are completely clueless.

    Here’s a tip. Go do some research on a company called Nortel and follow the bread crumbs. Your faux outrage is hilarious.

    • Colonial Viper 23.1

      maybe you think our intelligence services should be poodles at the beck and call of the NSA even against our own interests, but not everyone else does.

    • Draco T Bastard 23.2

      It’s one of those points that the right-wing just don’t seem to get: Just because someone else engages in immoral behaviour doesn’t give us carte blanche to do the same. Also known as: Two wrongs don’t make a right.

      We need to protect ourselves from their spying and call it out when we catch them but not actually engage in spying on them.

    • emergency mike 23.3

      Here’s a tip infused. If you read the OP you’ll find it’s about our spies spying on China, possibly in breach of an international treaty that we’ve signed up to.

      You seem to be concerned about China’s spying operations. Don’t sweat it, easy mistake I’m sure. Perhaps you could write a letter to the Chinese embassy about it? Or maybe become a Chinese citizen and vote against the Chinese Communist Party at the next election? Let us know what you decide to do and how it goes.

      I know you’re not pulling the old ‘but they did it too’ excuse for your mate John’s risky and rude treatment of one of our biggest trading partner’s representative guests in our country. Primary school kids don’t get away with that one. So that would be idiotic of you.

      Just like ol’ Honest John’s weekly “Labour did it too” and “Helen Clark did worse” lines for his weekly fuck up. They seem to go down a treat with the idiotic. Some of them even come around here and proudly, obediently, repeat them, apparently completely unaware how fucking idiotic it makes them look.

    • Pascals bookie 23.4

      lol Infused.

      last time you followed breadcrumbs you reported back that there would be a full scale war on the Korean peninsula within ten days, and Iran would attack Israel, or some shit.

      • infused 23.4.1

        Hey, we were close.

        This has already happened. Years ago, and explains many other cyber related spying issues in the process.

        • Pascals bookie 23.4.1.1

          No we were not close.

          You said a bunch of things were going to happen on account of your superior knowledge gleaned from deleted internet posts.

          A bunch of other people laughed at you said ‘no it won’t; you’re full of shit’

          Turned out those other people were correct.

  24. One Anonymous+Bloke 24

    The official response makes for ‘interesting’ reading.

    The Chinese Embassy in New Zealand issued a statement Sunday, saying that China was concerned about the report and attached great importance to the cyber security issue.

    “We will firmly safeguard our security interests and continue to guarantee our cyber and information security with concrete measures,” said the statement.

    “At present, cyber space is riddled with chaos and uncertainty. China proposes to settle disputes through dialogue and formulate codes to regulate cyber space behaviors that are acceptable to all sides.”

    Chaos and uncertainty, eh? Sounds quite inharmonious.

  25. Gosman 25

    Guess what guys. China spies on us as well. Shock Horror!

    • One Anonymous+Bloke 25.1

      The difference being that they’re in a position to do something about it, and we, um, aren’t.

      The story is high on the page. The National Party’s owner/donors will be nervous about the potential for a consumer boycott. “We won’t open all your mail” will be a great point of difference their competitors can exploit.

    • Sable 25.2

      The real question is why are we not fostering closer relations with China? Instead of backing the defunct USA?

      • cogito 25.2.1

        Judging by Auckland these days, I would say that we are. The Chinese already own our businesses and houses, won’t be long before they’re in our beds and we’re reciting passages from Chairman Mao’s little red book…. in Mandarin.

  26. Instauration 26

    MITM – LOL

    588 Great South Road – CONSULATE-GENERAL OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA IN AUCKLAND

    600 Great South Road – Endace Measurement Systems Limited – http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/8859155/NZ-firm-linked-to-suspect-spy-row

    630 Great South Road – CONSULATE-GENERAL OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA IN AUCKLAND Visa Office

    Follow the unstamped duct covers – dark fibre below.

    MEET-ME At Your Riser

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • NZ announces a third P-3 deployment in support of UN sanctions
    The Government has deployed a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3K2 Orion (P-3) maritime patrol aircraft to support the implementation of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions imposing sanctions against North Korea, announced Minister of Foreign Affairs Winston Peters and Minister of Defence Ron Mark. “New Zealand has long supported ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Pacific trade and development agreement a reality
    Pacific regional trade and development agreement PACER Plus will enter into force in 60 days now that the required eight countries have ratified it. Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker welcomed the announcement that the Cook Islands is the eighth nation to ratify this landmark agreement. “The agreement represents ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Securing a pipeline of teachers
    The Government is changing its approach to teacher recruitment as COVID-19 travel restrictions continue, by boosting a range of initiatives to get more Kiwis into teaching. “When we came into Government, we were faced with a teacher supply crisis,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “Over the past three years, we ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Border exceptions for a small number of international students with visas
    The Government has established a new category that will allow 250 international PhD and postgraduate students to enter New Zealand and continue their studies, in the latest set of border exceptions. “The health, safety and wellbeing of people in New Zealand remains the Government’s top priority. Tight border restrictions remain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First COVID-19 vaccine purchase agreement signed
    The Government has signed an agreement to purchase 1.5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 750,000 people – from Pfizer and BioNTech, subject to the vaccine successfully completing all clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, say Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods and Health Minister Chris Hipkins. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • International statement – End-to-end encryption and public safety
    We, the undersigned, support strong encryption, which plays a crucial role in protecting personal data, privacy, intellectual property, trade secrets and cyber security.  It also serves a vital purpose in repressive states to protect journalists, human rights defenders and other vulnerable people, as stated in the 2017 resolution of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Ministry of Defence Biodefence Assessment released
    The Ministry of Defence has today released a Defence Assessment examining Defence’s role across the spectrum of biological hazards and threats facing New Zealand. Biodefence: Preparing for a New Era of Biological Hazards and Threats looks at how the NZDF supports other agencies’ biodefence activities, and considers the context of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Approaches to Economic Challenges: Confronting Planetary Emergencies: OECD 9 October 2020
    New Approaches to Economic Challenges: Confronting Planetary Emergencies: OECD 9 October 2020 Hon David Parker’s response following Thomas Piketty and Esther Duflo. Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening, wherever in the world you might be. I first acknowledge the excellent thought provoking speeches of Thomas Piketty and Esther ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Kaipara Moana restoration takes next step
    A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed today at Waihāua Marae between the Crown, local iwi and councils to protect, restore and enhance the mauri of Kaipara Moana in Northland. Environment Minister David Parker signed the document on behalf of the Crown along with representatives from Ngā Maunga Whakahī, Ngāti ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand and Uruguay unite on reducing livestock production emissions
    Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and Uruguayan Minister of Livestock, Agriculture and Fisheries Carlos María Uriarte have welcomed the launch of a three-year project that will underpin sustainable livestock production in Uruguay, Argentina, and Costa Rica.  The project called ‘Innovation for pasture management’ is led by Uruguay’s National Institute of Agricultural ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • 3100 jobs created through marae upgrades
    Hundreds of marae throughout the country will be upgraded through investments from the Provincial Growth Fund’s refocused post COVID-19 funding to create jobs and put money into the pockets of local tradespeople and businesses, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones and Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta have announced. “A total ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Health volunteers recognised in annual awards
    Health Minister Chris Hipkins has announced 9 teams and 14 individuals are the recipients of this year’s Minister of Health Volunteer Awards.  “The health volunteer awards celebrate and recognise the thousands of dedicated health sector volunteers who give many hours of their time to help other New Zealanders,” Mr Hipkins ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Community COVID-19 Fund supports Pacific recovery
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio says a total of 264 groups and individuals have successfully applied for the Pacific Aotearoa Community COVID-19 Recovery Fund, that will support Pacific communities drive their own COVID-19 recovery strategies, initiatives, and actions. “I am keen to see this Fund support Pacific ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Community benefits from Māori apprenticeships
    Up to 50 Māori apprentices in Wellington will receive paid training to build houses for their local communities, thanks to a $2.75 million investment from the Māori Trades and Training Fund, announced Employment Minister Willie Jackson today. “This funding will enable Ngāti Toa Rangatira Incorporated to provide its Ngā Kaimahi ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Training fund supports Māori jobseekers
    Rapidly growing sectors will benefit from a $990,000 Māori Trades and Training Fund investment which will see Wellington jobseekers supported into work, announced Employment Minister Willie Jackson today. “This funding will enable Sapphire Consultants Ltd. to help up to 45 Māori jobseekers into paid training initiatives over two years through ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Ruakura Inland Port development vital infrastructure for Waikato
    The Government is investing $40 million to develop an inland port at Ruakura which will become a freight super-hub and a future business, research and residential development for the Waikato, Urban Development and Transport Minister Phil Twyford, and Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today. The funding has been has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Appointments made to Defence Expert Review Group
    Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today the establishment of an Expert Review Group to review a number of aspects of the New Zealand Defence Force’s (NZDF) structure, information management and record-keeping processes.  The Expert Review Group’s work arises out of the first recommendation from the Report of the Government’s Inquiry ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • No active community cases of COVID-19
    There are no active community cases of COVID-19 remaining in the country after the last people from the recent outbreak have recovered from the virus, Health Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “This is a big milestone. New Zealanders have once again through their collective actions squashed the virus. The systems ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Clean energy upgrade for more public buildings
    More public buildings will be supported by the Government to upgrade to run on clean energy, the Minister for Climate Change James Shaw announced today. Minister Shaw announced that Lincoln and Auckland universities will receive support through the Clean-Powered Public Service Fund to replace fossil fuel boilers. Southern, Taranaki, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Schools back donations scheme for the second year
    More schools have opted in to the donations scheme for 2021, compared to 2020 when the scheme was introduced. “The families of more than 447,000 students will be better off next year, with 94% of eligible schools and kura opting into the scheme,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “This is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Ruapehu cycle trails gets PGF boost
    The spectacular Mountains to Sea cycle trail in Ruapehu District will receive $4.6 million in funding from the Provincial Growth Fund for two additional trails, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This is an exciting development for the local community, and one that will provide significant economic opportunities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Update to air border order strengthens crew requirements
    Additional measures coming into effect on Monday will boost our defence against COVID-19 entering New Zealand through the air border, Health Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “As part of our precautionary approach and strategy of constant review, we’re tightening the requirements around international aircrew,” Chris Hipkins said. The COVID-19 Public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • A true picture of Māori business activity
    A better picture of the contribution Māori businesses make to the economy will be possible with changes to the way information is collected about companies and trading enterprises. Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Small Business Minister Stuart Nash have announced a new option for Māori enterprises who are part ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • PGF funding for Taranaki projects
    The South Taranaki museum, a New Plymouth distillery and a Pasifika building firm will benefit from a Government investment totalling more than $1 million, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones says. The $1.05m in grants and loans from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) will help the recipients expand and create ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Fijian Language Week 2020 inspires courage and strength during COVID-19 pandemic
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio says the theme for the 2020 Fijian Language Week reflects the strong belief by Fijians that their language and culture inspires courage and strength that is strongly needed in times of emergencies, or through a significant challenge like the global COVID-19 pandemic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Trades training builds on iwi aspirations
    An investment of $2.025 million from the Māori Trades and Training Fund will support Māori to learn new skills while making a positive difference for their communities, announced Employment Minister Willie Jackson today. “K3 Development Limited Partnership will receive $2,025,000 for its Takitimu Tuanui apprenticeship programme, which will support the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago