web analytics

The impact of right wing economics

Written By: - Date published: 8:14 am, November 6th, 2011 - 32 comments
Categories: capitalism, class war, us politics - Tags: ,

This infographic by Bill Marsh in the New York Times did the rounds a while ago.

1980 saw the election of Ronald Regan as US president. On taking office at the start of 1981 he ushered in a package of right wing economic policies that soon picked up the nick-name “Reganomics”. How did that work out for workers and for inequality?

Bill Marsh/The New York Times
Sources: Robert B. Reich, University of California, Berkeley; “The State of Working America” by the Economic Policy Institute; Thomas Piketty, Paris School of Economics, and Emmanuel Saez, University of California, Berkeley; Census Bureau; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Federal Reserve


History

32 comments on “The impact of right wing economics”

  1. RedLogix 1

    A comment last night pointed to this IMF article about Iceland. In that was mention of recent IMF research:

    IN his influential 1975 book Equality and Efficiency: The Big Tradeoff, Arthur Okun argued that pursuing equality can reduce efficiency (the total output produced with given resources). The late Yale University and Brookings Institution economist said that not only can more equal distribution of incomes reduce incentives to work and invest, but the efforts to redistribute—through such mechanisms as the tax code and minimum wages—can themselves be costly. Okun likened these mechanisms to a “leaky bucket.” Some of the resources transferred from rich to poor “will simply disappear in transit, so the poor will not receive all the money that is taken from the rich”—the result of administrative costs and disincentives to work for both those who pay taxes and those who receive transfers.

    Do societies inevitably face an invidious choice between efficient production and equitable wealth and income distribution? Are social justice and social product at war with one another?

    In a word, no.

    In recent work (Berg, Ostry, and Zettelmeyer, 2011; and Berg and Ostry, 2011), we discovered that when growth is looked at over the long term, the trade-off between efficiency and equality may not exist. In fact equality appears to be an important ingredient in promoting and sustaining growth. The difference between countries that can sustain rapid growth for many years or even decades and the many others that see growth spurts fade quickly may be the level of inequality. Countries may find that improving equality may also improve efficiency, understood as more sustainable long-run growth.

    In dry eco-speak these guys are basically say that the entire neo-liberal madness was predicated on a mistake.

    • Colonial Viper 1.1

      In dry eco-speak these guys are basically say that the entire neo-liberal madness was predicated on a mistake.

      No, you’re letting these guys off too lightly.

      The elite of society and finance saw an opportunity in the 1980’s to tilt wealth and influence back in their favour. Neo-liberalism was a tool they decided to use to do that.

      The fact that the theory was unsound or the implementation was not what the theory predicted is irrelevant because that was not what the elite of society and finance was interested in.

      A return to the gilded age however, was.

  2. mik e 2

    The facts are blindingly obvious all we need now to compound the US ‘s dire situation is for a republican tea party win in the senate and a republican president and the US will fall flat on its face just as the last time these factors were in place!

  3. Afewknowthetruth 3

    The ‘increased productivity’ myth gets repeated ad infinitum.

    An increase in mechanisation over time allowed humans to convert what nature produces (produced) into waste much faster than in the past.

    It follows, as sure as night follows day, that when oil depletion reaches a critical point ‘productivity’ will decline dramatically, taking down house-of-cards economics with it.

    The main points of interest to anyone suviving the Peak Oil bottleneck will be:

    1. Will psychotic sociopaths remain in control of whatever remains of society?

    2. Will the Earth remain habitable for humans?

    At this stage the answers look like 1: Yes, and 2: No.

  4. Afewknowthetruth 4

    On the matter of the failure of the growth model, and the collapse which is underway which is due to ‘government and finance betting on a future that cannot exist’::

    ‘My neat and tidy taxonomy of collapse, “The Five Stages of Collapse,” has been read more than 70,000 times just on my blog alone since I first published it in February of 2008. It continues to be popular: there were over 10,000 hits to the page just this year. People must still be finding it helpful.’

    http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2011/10/stages-of-collapse-revised-joined-at.html

    ‘I wished for an orderly cascade of collapsing institutions, with enough of a gap between them for public psychology and behavior to adjust to the new reality. But almost four lost years of both government and finance betting on a future that cannot exist, doubling down every time they lose again, have dashed those hopes. The effect, I think, will be to compress financial and political collapse into a single chaotic episode. Commercial collapse will not be far behind, because global commerce is dependent on global finance, and once international credit locks up the tankers and the container ships won’t sail. Shortly thereafter it will be lights out.’

    • One Anonymous Bloke 4.1

      Obviously your work must be brilliant – so many people have read it. You can apply the same logic to Atlas Shrugged.
      Still no peer-reviewed citations then?

      • Draco T Bastard 4.1.1

        You really should read what’s linked, or even the link, before spouting off. That way you wouldn’t look like a right twerp.

        • One Anonymous Bloke 4.1.1.1

          Sorry to burst your self-inflating bubble, Draco: I did read it. It is utterly devoid of citations or references, simply being an opinion piece that regurgitates AFKTT’s relentless mantra, tiresome, biased, and unsupported.

          • M 4.1.1.1.1

            Dimitri Orlov is excellent and always delightfully phlegmatic – even if you cannot stomach other commentators this guy is calm and matter of fact when laying out how we have bumped up against resource limits:

            • RedLogix 4.1.1.1.1.1

              I’ve read and listened to a lot of Orlov, but this is superb.

              I worked for period in Russia some years back and it left me with just enough experience to recognise Orlov’s line of thinking as absolutely correct. I’ve seen exactly what he says about Russia being ‘collapse resistant’ for myself.. and how deeply unprepared most Western nations are by comparison.

          • Colonial Viper 4.1.1.1.2

            OAB:

            There will be no real world economic recovery in NZ as long as petrol stays over $2/L.

            Bet on it.

          • Draco T Bastard 4.1.1.1.3

            The impression I get from you is that even if you had read the peer reviewed articles that backs up what AFKTT says you still wouldn’t accept an opinion piece that said the same thing. In fact, I get the distinct impression you wouldn’t accept the peer reviewed stuff either.

            • One Anonymous Bloke 4.1.1.1.3.1

              Draco, again your assumptions are letting you down: I can and do read a great deal of material, and I am used to finding and checking sources, and you will note my tendency to link directly to them. I don’t trust videos: they can be made to say anything the editor wants them to.

              AFKTT is a 9/11 and Moon landings “truther”, which does her/his credibility on economic and climate matters no good whatsoever, since it points to confirmation bias of epic proportions, to put it mildly. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Google Scholar is your friend.

              Oh, and don’t forget why science works: peer review is a concerted effort to dig holes in your argument, undermine your conclusions, spot errors in your measurements. Presenting article after article making the same point over and over again does the opposite. In other words, the arguments as presented fail the baloney detection test.

              “Blaming the internet for your gullibility is like blaming the screwdriver for your neurological impairment.”

              • uke

                Peer review is not full-proof. An interesting review of the failures of this system by Juan Miguel Campanario:
                 
                Rejecting and resisting Nobel class discoveries: accounts by Nobel Laureates
                 
                “I review and discuss instances in which 19 future Nobel Laureates encountered resistance on the part of the scientific community towards their discoveries, and instances in which 24 future Nobel Laureates encountered resistance on the part of scientific journal editors or referees to manuscripts that dealt with discoveries that later would earn them the Nobel Prize.”

                • One Anonymous Bloke

                  Of course peer review isn’t fool-proof , but it’s the worst possible system apart from all the other ones.

    • Draco T Bastard 4.2

      This is a good read as well.

      Hubbert said, “The third curve (on the left) is simply the mathematical curve for exponential growth. No physical quantity can follow this curve for more than a brief period of time. However, a sum of money, being of a nonphysical nature and growing according to the rules of compound interest at a fixed interest rate, can follow that curve indefinitely…Our principle constraints are cultural…we have evolved a culture so heavily dependent upon the continuance of exponential growth for its stability that it is incapable of reckoning with problems of non-growth…it behooves us…to begin a serious examination of the…cultural adjustments necessary…before unmanageable crises arise…”

      • One Anonymous Bloke 4.2.1

        The statistical analysis is somewhat beyond me, but J.H. Laherrère’s analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the Hubbert curve concludes:

        “Hubbert’s modelling technique has been variously applauded and criticised, but the constraints to its application have not been widely appreciated. It works well only where applied to a natural domain, unaffected by political or significant economic interference; to areas having a large number of fields; and to areas of unfettered activity.”

        “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.” Albert Einstein.

        • Draco T Bastard 4.2.1.1

          Hell, and now you’re even denying reality.

          • One Anonymous Bloke 4.2.1.1.1

            If you’re referring to Einstein’s remark, it’s a corollary of the saying “all models are wrong some models are useful”. Or do you think I’m denying the inevitability of Peak Oil? Or are you just spraying attack lines without any clear purpose like a demented wingnut?

            • Colonial Viper 4.2.1.1.1.1

              The inevitability of peak oil?

              Peak conventional oil is history my friend, went by us several years ago.

              Why do you think that the world will have zero net economic growth per capital for years now?

              • One Anonymous Bloke

                Good point, bad choice of words 🙂

                • Afewknowtheturth

                  OAB

                  A deep rooted arrogance, combined with insecurity, which manifests as the need to put down other people and try to score points off them, rather than seek and discover truth.

                  • NickS

                    So says the conspiracy wanker who couldn’t logic his way out a paper bag…

                  • One Anonymous Bloke

                    According to you, you have discovered the “truth” about all sorts of things: the Moon landings, 9/11, macro-economics and probably HAARP too. Insecurity sounds preferable.

          • NickS 4.2.1.1.2

            He’s not saying anything particularly all that different than the philosophy of science cluebats dealing with uncertainty that I’ve posted here in the past. Only his deals with mathematical modelling, and without as many words.

            Because he cheated.

            With quotes.

            Grrr.

  5. randal 5

    all the above is true but reagans activities must be reckoned as a whole.
    how many aircraft carriers, nuclear submarines etc were made during his tenure.
    to secure that amount of confidence in any economy requires massive amounts of payoffs to the consumer. and generating the common psychology. Think the “Eagles”. In the end it all turned to shit as the economy was deflated by the savings and loan scandals and the crash of ’87.
    so who won?

  6. randal 6

    Oh and I forgot to mention the introduction of the PC and spreadsheets where any old accountant could steal everything with the strok of a keyboard.

  7. RedLogix 7

    Kim Hill interviewed Dr Ravi Batra this last Saturday morning.

    Batra is a professor of economics at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and the author of five best-selling books. His 1978 book, The Downfall of Capitalism and Communism, predicted the downfall of the Soviet Union, and his 2008 book, The New Golden Age: The Coming Revolution against Political Corruption and Economic Chaos (Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN: 978-0230613959), predicted the current economic crisis.

    • Afewknowtheturth 7.1

      RL

      That’s all very well but ‘where are the peer reviews and citations?’

      According to ‘our friend’, without those Batra’s just another conspiracy wingnut who wears a tinfoil hat and gets too much exposure.

      • One Anonymous Bloke 7.1.1

        You’re getting close. The fact is that even the most well-informed single opinion is just that: a single opinion. Lots of people “predicted the current economic crisis”, so that in itself is hardly a ringing endorsement – did Batra put his money where his mouth was like Eisman? Wikipedia is more forthcoming: “Batra proposes an equitable distribution system known as PROUT ( PROgressive Utilization Theory) as a means to not only ensure material welfare but also to secure the ability of all to develop a full personality.”

        “The Prout cooperative system is founded on the principle of “coordinated cooperation,” where free human beings with equal rights and mutual respect work together for the welfare of all.”

        “The colour of the sky is green on Dr. Batra’s planet” (I made that one up).

        “In 1993, Batra received the Ig Nobel Prize in economics.”

        Sounds like a real guru, doesn’t he?

        But this merely serves to emphasise the point I have been trying to make – AFKTT, all you ever do is post links to people who you think agree with you, whether or not their views are consistent with one another.

  8. John 8

    I’m not a “Key Person” in the new world of Key, I’m a Key statistic, you failed on jobs and that has repercussions after 36 months of dribble from the trickle down.

    The Key Job Losses are what is important, how are those jobs coming back fast? 36 Months and nothing!!!!

Recent Comments

Recent Posts


History

  • More cracks appear in health funding
    News that the Waikato District Health Board could lose $2.7 million from its budget because it failed to make an elective target is downright disturbing, says Labour’s Acting Health spokesperson Dr David Clark.  “This is a DHB that has tried ...
    5 hours ago
  • Student debt cracks the billion mark
    New figures showing that student loan defaulters have now clocked over $1 billion in debt highlights National's failure to combat spiralling student loan debt, Labour's Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. "Threatening to arrest returning student loan borrowers at the ...
    1 day ago
  • Foreign Students just a commodity to National
    National MP Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi has confirmed that his party sees international students as nothing more than a commodity, says Labour's Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. "Mr Bakshi’s appalling comparison of some students to 'faulty fridges' that should be returned to ...
    2 days ago
  • Tolley’s spin on Education spend doesn’t add up
    National’s spin about school funding won’t wash with parents who are paying more and more of the cost of their kids’ education every year, says Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  “All the spin in the world can’t hide the fact ...
    2 days ago
  • National not facing up to export challenge
    “The latest export data from Statistics New Zealand paints a picture of an economy which is not paying its way in the world, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Exports fell 9% - led by milk powder exports falling to ...
    2 days ago
  • Correction over Talley’s statement
    Labour’s Workplace Relations spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway has been advised by AFFCO Ltd that AFFCO is not advertising for staff in the Manawatu through MSD as stated in a press statement released earlier today.  “I have been advised by AFFCO that ...
    5 days ago
  • Minister, cut your losses – withdraw this doomed Bill
    Local Government Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga’s request for a five month extension on the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2) is an admission that the Bill is fundamentally flawed, says Labour’s Local Government Spokesperson ...
    5 days ago
  • Coleman’s cuts create crisis
    Mental health services in New Zealand are in a state of crisis with Youthline saying that calls for extreme depression doubled last year, says Labour’s Associate Health spokesperson Dr David Clark.  “About 150 young Kiwis are missing out on help ...
    5 days ago
  • Government helping Talley’s to break workers
    The Ministry for Social Development appears to be assisting Talley’s-Affco replace experienced workers effectively locked out by the company, say Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni and Workplace Relations spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “MSD is advertising for meat processing workers for ...
    5 days ago
  • Electives lag due to $1.7 billion hole
    The lag in hip and knee replacements is a direct consequence of the Government’s $1.7 billion underfunding of health, says Labour’s Associate Health spokesperson Dr David Clark.  “A comprehensive study by the University of Otago says that the rate of ...
    5 days ago
  • Speech to Master Builders’ Constructive conference
    Today’s all about being Constructive. And that is good because I believe there is a hunger out there for positive solutions. We must be able to believe there can be a better future. ...
    5 days ago
  • Māori Party housing plan complete failure
    The Māori Party’s housing plan to put more Māori into more homes has been a complete failure with fewer than five loans granted per year, says Labour’s Maori Development spokesperson Kelvin Davis. ...
    6 days ago
  • Fund IRD better to go after tax avoiders
    National’s Tax Working Group used the following graph (p30) in 2010 as part of their justification to cut the top tax rate. The big peaks around the top tax threshold were evidence of a suspiciously high number of taxpayers ...
    GreensBy robert.ashe
    6 days ago
  • Pasifika youth ignored by the Government
    The Adolescent Health Research Group’s new report on the wellbeing of young Pacific people shines a spotlight on the Government’s failure  to deliver any “brighter future” for them, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “Their research shows ...
    6 days ago
  • Police in the provinces are dissatisfied
    Police in the cities of Gisborne, Napier and Hastings are a lot more unhappy than their big city cousins says Labour’s Police Spokesman Stuart Nash.     “In fact the top four districts for enjoyable work within NZ Police are ...
    6 days ago
  • Govt action needed after Wheeler holds
    The Reserve Bank Governor’s warning that “excessive house price inflation” is posing a risk to financial stability puts the pressure back on the Government to take action to address the housing crisis, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Graeme Wheeler’s ...
    6 days ago
  • Minister confirms – new ministry only about abuse
    ...
    7 days ago
  • Silver Ferns Farms decision a tragedy
    The rubber stamping by the Overseas Investment Office of the Shanghai Maling buyout of Silver Fern Farms is a sorry day for the once proud New Zealand meat sector, says Labour’s spokesperson for Primary Industries, Damien O’Connor.  “Generations of Kiwis ...
    7 days ago
  • Benching Nick Smith first step to Kermadec solution
    Side-lining Nick Smith must be the first step in sorting out the Government's Kermadec debacle, says Labour's Fisheries Spokesperson Rino Tirikatene. “Last week Labour called for Nick Smith to be removed from further negotiations with Te Ohu Kaimoana over the ...
    1 week ago
  • Parents, schools, teachers oppose bulk funding
    Overwhelming opposition to the National Government’s school bulk funding proposal is unsurprising and Hekia Parata should now unequivocally rule out proceeding with the idea, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Bulk funding could only lead to bigger class sizes or ...
    1 week ago
  • MBIE gives up on enforcing the law
      The Government must provide labour inspectors with the resources they need to enforce basic employment law after reports that MBIE is only prosecuting the worst cases, says Labour’s Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway.  “Today’s news that MBIE ...
    1 week ago
  • West Coast population declines amid bleak economic forecast
    Despite the country experiencing record population growth, the number of people living in the West Coast fell, highlighting struggles in the region from low commodity prices and a poor economic forecast, says Labour’s Economic Development spokesperson David Clark. “The latest ...
    1 week ago
  • Recovery roadblocks cause for concern
    Strong pressure on mental health services, a flagging local economy and widespread issues with dodgy earthquake repairs are all causes for concern for people in Canterbury according to a new survey, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. “Today the CDHB’s ...
    1 week ago
  • Motel purchase must not kick people onto the street
    The Government’s purchase of a South Auckland motel to house the homeless must come with a promise that the current long term tenants will not be kicked out onto the streets, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “It is bizarre ...
    1 week ago
  • Not everyone singing along to so-called rock star economy
    The Westpac McDermott Miller Confidence Survey shows there is serious unease about the economy’s ability to deliver benefits to many New Zealanders, despite the Government trumpeting headline figures, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “According to this survey a significantly ...
    1 week ago
  • Youth no better off under National’s “guarantee”
    John Key’s Youth Guarantee is such a spectacular failure that those who undertake the programme are more likely to end up on a benefit and less likely to end up in full-time employment than those who don’t, Leader of the ...
    1 week ago
  • More low-skilled students becoming residents
    New figures showing international students now make up nearly 40 per cent of all principal applicants approved for New Zealand residency and that their skill level has fallen dramatically, are further evidence that National’s immigration system is broken, says Labour’s ...
    2 weeks ago
  • 35% of offshore speculators paying no tax
    Offshore investors are aggressively exploiting tax breaks to pay no tax on their rental properties according to IRD data released by Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “35% of offshore investors are paying no tax on their properties, and are pocketing ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Friday fish dump stinks
    This government has dumped bad news on a Friday to try to avoid political scrutiny in Parliament, says Labour’s Environment spokesperson David Parker. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OECD report card: National must try harder
    The OECD report on education shows there’s much more to be done for young Kiwis, Labour’s education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kermadec stoush shows Maori Party double-standards
    The Māori Party’s reaction to the trampled Treaty rights and the Government’s lack of consultation on the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary reeks of the same arrogant mismanagement of the unpopular Maori land reforms, Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Flawed fish dumping calls
    The finding that MPI failed to properly enforce the law even when it had evidence of fish dumping seriously damages the trust and credibility of the Ministry, the industry and this Government, Labour's Fisheries Spokesperson Rino Tirikatene says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Sidestepping Smith should be side-lined
    Nick Smith's arrogance and disrespect towards Māori is putting the future of the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary at risk and he needs to excuse himself from further negotiations with Te Ohu Kaimoana, Labour's Fisheries spokesperson Rino Tirikatene says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must respond to cash for jobs scam
    Urgent Government action is required to halt  the emerging cash-for-jobs immigration scandal that is taking hold in New Zealand says Labour’s Immigration Spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway.  “Stories of rogue immigration agents scamming thousands of dollars from migrant workers are just further ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government dragging its feet on surgical mesh
    Jonathan Coleman is dragging his feet over any action to protect New Zealanders from more disasters with surgical mesh, says Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “The Government’s pathetic response is to claim all will be fixed by a new regime to ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour’s baby number app goes gangbusters
    An interactive tool that celebrates Labour’s achievements in health over the decades has become an online hit, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “Since the tool was launched last night, 18 thousand people have used it to find their baby ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Real disposable income falls in last three months
    Kiwis are working harder than ever but real disposable income per person fell in the last quarter thanks to record population increases, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson said. ‘In Budget 2016 the National Government said that what mattered most for ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Baby number app celebrates Labour achievements
    Labour has launched an interactive tool that allows New Zealanders to take a look back at our achievements in health over the decades, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “Today is the 78th anniversary of the Social Security Act 1938, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Legal experts unpick Māori land reforms
    One of New Zealand’s top law firms has joined the chorus of legal experts heavily critical of the controversial Te Ture Whenua Maori Bill, adding more weight to the evidence that the reforms fall well beneath the robust legal standards ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Industries most reliant on immigration worst offenders
    The industries most reliant on immigration are the worst offenders when it comes to meeting their most basic employment obligations, says Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway.  “The industries that are most reliant on immigration are Hospitality, Administration, Agriculture, Forestry and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Time to remove law that discriminates against sole parents
    It’s time to repeal a harmful law that sanctions those who do not name the other parent of their child, Labour’s Social Development Spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Every week, 17,000 children are missing out because their sole parent is being ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government handling of Kermadecs threatens Treaty rights
    ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Prime Minister should give Police Minister some backbone
    The Prime Minister should condemn the ridiculously light sentence given to Nikolas Delegat for seriously assaulting a police woman, Labour’s Police spokesman Stuart Nash says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government listens to Labour on family violence
    Labour is pleased the Government has finally acted on strengthening a range of measures against family violence, says Labour’s spokesperson on Family Violence Poto Williams.  “Some of the latest changes including a new family violence offence of non-fatal strangulation is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must rethink paying for police checks
    National’s decision to ignore the concerns of charities will see the voluntary sector face hundreds of thousands of dollars in new costs if the Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill passes, says Labour's Community and Voluntary Sector spokesperson Poto Williams.  “National’s ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Seven months for families in cars to be housed
    Disturbing new figures show it is now taking the Ministry of Social Development an average of seven months to house families who are living in cars, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says.  “John Key made a song and dance ...
    2 weeks ago
  • North Korea test must be condemned
    The nuclear test by North Korea that registered 5.3 on the Richter scale needs to be condemned, says Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer. “This test, coming hard on the heels of a missile launch a few days ago, shows ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Tribe footing the bill for Maori Party?
     Waikato-Tainui deserve committed representation, yet the President of the Maori Party is muddying the waters by confusing the core business of the tribe with party politics, says Labour’s Hauraki-Waikato MP Nanaia Mahuta.  “The only way to fix this growing negative ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Schools set to lose millions
    Schools will start 2017 grappling with a $7.8 million funding cut, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Hekia Parata has been adamant changes to the way our schools are funded would see them better off. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • 70% of families in cold, damp homes powerless to fix them
    Shocking new figures out today show 70 per cent of the families living in cold, damp homes are powerless to make improvements because they are in rental properties, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “The 2016 Household Incomes Report highlights ...
    3 weeks ago


History


History


History