web analytics

Why Labour’s student debt policy is a success

Written By: - Date published: 1:56 pm, May 15th, 2019 - 85 comments
Categories: education, employment, grant robertson, jacinda ardern, labour, making shit up, Media, national, tertiary education, uncategorized - Tags:

For some time the right have been making this loud noise about Labour’s student loan policy and how it has failed because the number of students have not increased dramatically.

The manufactured narrative has persuaded some in the media.  They have bought into the premise.  But it is frustrating because the policy was all about generational equity and nothing about boosting student numbers.

If you need proof here is the relevant section from Labour’s policy platform.

Notice the phrase “will leave study with less debt”?

The comparison is fatuous.  It is like saying that climate change policy has failed because crime statistics have increased.

And the reduction in borrowing will long term have a significant beneficial effect.  It will not clear debt but it will mean that current students will be able to remove the millstone of debt from their neck sooner.

The reporting on the announcement that the Government will be able to make $200 million in savings on the scheme is also mischievous at best.  The savings are because the amount needed is less than anticipated.  A healthy economy and soaring employment reduces the desire of people to engage in full time education.

And this is also the message from Victoria University Students Association president Tamatha Paul.  From Radio New Zealand:

Ms Paul told Morning Report the scheme was proving beneficial to students.

“We know that this policy is being extremely helpful,” she said.

“We’re having conversations with students consistently, who are saying they wouldn’t have come to the university if it wasn’t for this policy, especially students coming from disadvantaged backgrounds and especially those getting scholarships who are now dedicated that money towards accommodation and living costs, instead of tertiary fees.”

“So I think they should keep their commitments and keep the funding where it is, were promises were made… Tertiary education, whether it’s higher training, university or polytechnic, should be affordable for everybody.”

However, Ms Paul said she was already disappointed the government was redirecting $200 million from the $1.9 billion allocated to scheme over four years, towards reforming vocational training.

“I don’t think it’s a good idea to assess the policy after one year… why are we assessing it and making such massive cuts. We do need to wait and see how it pans out,” she said.

I do not think she has grounds for being disappointed.  If the money is not spent then it should be used elsewhere.  But the roll out of the policy should continue. So that the incidence of crippling debt on our young people is reduced.

85 comments on “Why Labour’s student debt policy is a success ”

  1. Stuart Munro. 1

    What it actually shows is that the policy was affordable, contrary to the high-pitched whining of Gnats. And, being affordable, one has to ask why a group as self-congratulatory about its economic skills as the previous government could not afford it.

    • Students looking for an education are likely to wait until its free for longer, hence Labour need to roll it out to three years, not just the first. Naff Nats don't have a clue we need well balanced educated workers with a aging pop, they did nothing and now are laughing out their two faces when Labour isn't as successful as it meant to be as if it was their batty success.

  2. Ad 2

    At 4% unemployment and fewer school leavers, demand for tertiary education can be expected lower.

    More interesting to see what they will reallocate the savings to at budget.

    • SPC 2.1

      1. Sure employers are more likely to grab some straight from school and train on the job if there are not enough grads about.

      2. Its already been tagged for other educational use. The industry training providers/apprenticeships area.

    • Dukeofurl 2.2

      Its already been said the money will be 'directed' towards the polytech/vocational training area.

  3. "And while 50 per cent of students from the high decile schools go on to university, only 17 per cent from the low deciles make it in."

    I'm all for intergenerational equality..but maybe we need to work on 'equality' generally. Though I'm interested to see you use that phrase, it certainly explains Labour Policies with Kiwibuild and fees free clearly being all about intergenerational equality for the middle classes.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12179117

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/377757/fee-free-policy-having-little-impact-on-school-leavers-decisions

    • Kat 3.1

      I would argue it was the very push to get a university "education" post WWll that saw a gradual then rapid decline in apprenticeships and the take up of "lower class" trades. A degree was always promoted as a "step up the ladder to success". Sadly that thinking is still prominent today, and there lies the irony of your " inter-generational equality".

      At least the Labour led coalition is attempting to do something positive, I wouldn’t knock it just yet.

      • Pat 3.1.1

        the promotion of a university education as the only path to 'success' has been detrimental but the decline in apprenticeships (and their quality) is unrelated IMO….the apprenticeship path was completely undermined by the formation of ITOs

        • Kat 3.1.1.1

          My comment was the use of class terminology, trade apprenticeships were always "lower class". The "middle class" in NZ as a label is who we are, Jack being as good as his master.

          • Pat 3.1.1.1.1

            class terminology or otherwise, the point remains

            • Kat 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Except the decline being "unrelated" is the irony.

              • Pat

                and i would disagree around the timeframe of decline…as stated the decline is directly related to the formation of ITOs….the fact that some (and Id suggest a small minority) looked down their noses at 'the trades' is largely irrelevant…the decline began in the 1990s not post WW2

                • Kat

                  Read my comment above again about the push, the gradual, then the rapid decline since WW2.

                  • Pat

                    i have and my comment holds

                  • Pat

                    i am commenting on your comment @ 3.1 as the notation 3.1.1 indicates

                  • Pat

                    your comment caused me some reflection….if the decline of which you speak is the Labour Party rather than the desirablity of the trades then I agree with your timeframe..it is indeed ironic that the offspring of the blue collar workers that formed the Labour Party are now overwhelmingly graduates with no intimate understanding of those they claim to represent, and also why that support has waned….perhaps it is not so difficult to understand why so much policy appears directed at the middle class

        • Molly 3.1.1.2

          " the apprenticeship path was completely undermined by the formation of ITOs ".

          I agree, Pat, and this was compounded by the lack of oversight when they moved the theory and oversight out of the hands of institutions, and to private individuals. The quality of the training was largely influenced by the quality of the teacher, and many received limited scope in their training. In particularly, in construction where the apprenticeship schemes coincided with a dismantling of foundation to roofing builds, and many apprenticeships work on one aspect of the build and don't see projects through to the finish.

          • Pat 3.1.1.2.1

            indeed… sadly due to the lost capability, after 30 years it will likely take as long to remedy, if we can at all.

    • Pat 3.2

      "…and fees free clearly being all about intergenerational equality for the middle classes."

      pretty much….and a little paternalism to round it off

    • Observer Tokoroa 3.3

      Hi Siobhan

      Leaving aside the extensive wealthy sector of the NZ Population, should we expect Students to pay exorbitant Fees to the Universities.

      Are Universities really needed, in the age of Digital Communication and Information ?

      Or is the continued impoverishment of hundreds of thousands of poor people satisfactory and pleasing to the Education Industry? Training Courses of any Kind should not be passed on to the Poor.

  4. Gosman 4

    Why is removing debt for middle to upper middle class people beneficial to New Zealand as a whole?

    • mickysavage 4.1

      Because at the time they are poor people. They should be allowed to thrive and then pay more tax.

      • Enough is Enough 4.1.1

        Pay more tax than what?

        • mickysavage 4.1.1.1

          Than they would if they were not successful lawyers or doctors or whatever.

          • Bewildered 4.1.1.1.1

            kiwi build, 1b trees, thousands of jobs from provincial growth fund, 1800 new police in 2 years, reduction in child poverty, Free student fees to the wealthy, Subsidised electricity to the wealthy Entering Pike River mine beyond a few 100m (even that has yet still to be achieved) All policy fails, not even a must do better. Mickey however an A+ for cheer leading and dancing on the head of a pin

            • mickysavage 4.1.1.1.1.1

              You expect dramatic turnarounds so quickly and do not tolerate delays. Why is that?

              • Rob

                We are expecting these dramatic turnarounds as you put it Mickey, because that is what we were promised.

                For all of us in the building industry , we were told that we were doing it wrong and that they would fix it, what ever that is.

              • Enough is Enough

                Labour told us that they would turn it around.

                Kiwibuild is playing out exactly as it opponents predicted it would.

          • James 4.1.1.1.2

            or if they get a BA – front line McDonald’s workers.

          • Sabine 4.1.1.1.3

            the country needs plumbers, builders, bakers, cabinet makers, nurses, teachers, sparkies, people that can build stuff that does not leak, does not mold, does not kill, does not poison the world …..but lawyers is the one thing the world does not need. We have to many of the empty suits already.

        • Pat 4.1.1.2

          pay more tax than whom

      • Gosman 4.1.2

        But Labour is not raising taxes on the top earners to compensate.

    • SPC 4.2

      Reducing educational debt to reduce inter-generational inequality.

      Having tertiary debt makes it harder to do the now difficult, save to buy a home.

      • Muttonbird 4.2.1

        Yes. A CGT was to reduce intergenerational inequality also but a bridge too far right now apparently.

        Your comment will have fallen on deaf ears unfortunately because the people gosman represents merely view intergenerational inequality as their competitive advantage over lower income families – something which the state should not busy itself in addressing.

      • Gosman 4.2.2

        The issue with housing is a lack of supply. Increasing the amount first home buyers will be able to afford will just feed in to increased house prices.

        • SPC 4.2.2.1

          Even if there were the supply, there would is a problem with people getting the deposit together to buy if they are delayed by having tertiary debt (there is the family time window involved).

          That supply has to be dealt with is no reason for ignoring this issue.

      • Tuppence Shrewsbury 4.2.3

        rather ridiculous argument. You invest in your degree to seen a higher wage to be able to afford a house sooner.

        Not all debt is bad.

        • SPC 4.2.3.1

          Having trouble comprehending the difference between doing a tertiary degree and having no debt and not doing a tertiary degree at all?

    • Dukeofurl 4.3

      "Why is removing debt for middle to upper middle class people "

      because its not only for them- it covers level 3 courses which include almost all apprentices, and plenty of others such as hairdressers, office & computer courses, forestry and agriculture , horticulture. and so on.

      What you are showing Gosman is your own middle to upper middle class biases and assume that everyone studying is 'just like you'

      • Gosman 4.3.1

        You think the uptake on this is going to be shared proportionately across income groups do you?

  5. bwaghorn 5

    Id be interested to know if any poo people got to start futher education because of this policy. If they did that makes it a success imho

    • Enough is Enough 5.1

      Poor people could always start further education. The loan system wasn't restricted to the middle class.

      When I went through university between 1998 and 2002, we were all broke. Some had rich parents who paid their fees but the majority of us had to borrow to pay course and living fees. I wasn’t prevented from accessing further education because I could not afford it – nobody was.

      I left university with a $40,000 loan that was repaid by the time I turned 35.

      Some people will call that a burden. I called it an investment in my future.

      • Pat 5.1.1

        student debt paid off at 35 (and still paying tax)…..35 seems rather late in life to have paid for your education (not a criticism of the person)….especially if society values your skills

      • greywarshark 5.1.2

        An investment in your future – if the PTB don't instigate a great shaking up and sacking regime. It is okay if you can pay it off, but house prices have gone higher, rent is higher, and the trend forecast for salaries is down or precarious 24 hour call up at times.

        You have done it, my son and daughter in law have done it – got jobs and repaid the debt. But that is not strong indication that it is a valid system for the mass of people. It needs to be suitable for 90% of people don't you think and do we know how many are having difficulties trying to repay and make a life and find secure work will regular pay rises to allow a reasonable lifestyle.

    • Cinny 5.2

      Am guessing you left an r off of poor llololz 🙂

      Anyways I know someone who is poor/low income and a solo parent. They are working part-time and studying fee's free for an early childhood qualification.

      The only reason that person is studying is due to fee's free.

      Said student is getting really good marks, am super happy and proud of them.

      • Enough is Enough 5.2.1

        Said student only gets one year free and can borrrow the balance – as they always have…

        They will continue to get good marks and I am also happy for them

  6. Exkiwiforces 6

    Does this awesome plan apply for those doing farm/ horticulture Cadetships and those doing apprenticeships when the “No Mates Party’s” back in the 90’s said if you want to continue your training for your specific occupation, you needed to take out a student loan in line with university counterparts in order to finish or start your training?

    In my case I told them back then, you can stick your student loan scheme up your Jackise as the pay rate for my chosen field was just above the minimum wage and I didn’t have a hope in hell of paying it off until my mid to late 30’s back then I had stayed in NZ to complete my studies/ training. The pay rates in NZ Army was even worse and in some case below the minimum, hence why I popped smoke and bugged off overseas.

    Thanks “No Mates Party” for sending/ driving me overseas and it’s great to see the Labour CoL giving 1st years a leg up, unlike the “No Mates Party” who rather get overseas tradies and farm workers in to drive down wages and even worst didn’t or want to invest in young NZer’s who a trade or do a farm/ horticulture Cadetship.

    • In Vino 6.1

      +1 Exkiwiforces

      I have been so irritated by New Zealand's recent failure to recognise that Education is a Public Good as much as a private one.

      Rogernomes taught that it was purely a private one, and we foolishly introduced 'User Pays'.

      We need to grow up and face the fact that Education is a Public Good. Look at Germany – one of the most successful economies in the world.

      • greywarshark 6.1.1

        The National Party and RW in general are bottom-feeders who think they are smart for forcing wages down for the general working person.

        I believe that the Treasury, if it wants to be a good manager of the economy, should have similarly looked for cost-efficiency in salaries at the top level and introduced tendering for a position. That would both cut 'human resource' expenditure, and probably the fee paid to agencies which is probably tied in some way to the level of salary in the person found for the position. And the managers and CEO would get a small performance bonus at Christmas on the same percentage as the workers. That would mean they would get considerably more, but there would be limits to their expectations then.

    • A 6.2

      Yea +Exkiwi

      The more education costs, the greater the risk to the student…sorry "investor". Nothing beats real world learning in terms of investment returns. It's more satisfying and you are likely to pick up skills that leave academics in the dust.

  7. Whirlsler 7

    Let's say it was government policy to pain every house in the country bright red. Let's say that one reason for doing this is that red houses are happier houses. Let us also say that they go out there and succeed with this policy.

    The Opposition complain that happiness statistics haven't improved at all and say that the policy is therefore bad. The government and its supporters insist that the only justification for the policy is that they wanted houses to be red. They did that. Therefore the policy is a good one.

    In this example, the Opposition's position is much more sustainable. As with Labour and student fees (as presented in this article) the government's position is "true, but trivial". It (and Labour) deserve no respect as a result of their "success".

    I have an enormous student loan. It is as big as the example ones, if not larger. But I am a massive outlier in this respect. On the whole, NZ's student loans are (a) pretty small and (b) interest free. Fees are not a barrier to students. Fixating on the size of the debts of students is entirely misleading because what we actually care about isn't the size of the debts. Or, at least, it shouldn't be. Successfully reducing debts or painting houses red doesn't validate the existence of the policy.

    Labour were very happy to piggy back off the (vastly stronger) "access" rationale. Sure, it exposes them to the critique that living costs (not fees) are the problem. Indeed, the absence of the postgrad student allowance (also promised by this government) is one of the reasons my loan is increasing (and I live very frugally). To turn around and act like this has nothing to do with their policy is completely specious. Especially when it's a nonsense to talk about "affordable" without "access"…

    Even worse, the whole debt thing piggy backs off an American discourse where the base loans are vastly bigger and interest is charged on them…

    In terms of the access rationale. Firstly, they should have, immediately, restored the postgrad allowance. Secondly, they should have, immediately, brought in the improvements to the undergrad scheme they did bring in. Thirdly, they should have worked to massively expand the allowance scheme (particularly at undergrad/non-university tertiary providers) as soon as they could. Fourthly, they should have looked at facilitating improved transport concessions (these being part of the access issue). And finally they should have investigated what else they could do, e.g. means testing fees free. Universal fees free policies are a nice to have, once you’re sure the real access issues have been addressed. But helping low income families can never win as many votes as helping the middle class.

    • SPC 7.1

      Sure they should have brought back the post graduate student allowances straight away.

      But it would be inappropriate to charge some and not others for education costs. Its universal one way, or the other.

      • greywarshark 7.1.1

        Tunnelling through Whirsler's prolix, this at the end offered some thoughts that seemed reasonable.

        In terms of the access rationale.

        Firstly, they should have, immediately, restored the postgrad allowance.

        Secondly, they should have, immediately, brought in the improvements to the undergrad scheme they did bring in.

        Thirdly, they should have worked to massively expand the allowance scheme (particularly at undergrad/non-university tertiary providers) as soon as they could.

        Fourthly, they should have looked at facilitating improved transport concessions (these being part of the access issue). And finally they should have investigated what else they could do, e.g. means testing fees free. Universal fees free policies are a nice to have, once you’re sure the real access issues have been addressed. But helping low income families can never win as many votes as helping the middle class.

        Offering free fee for the first year and waving the carrot of extending that to three years was good to boost the idea of getting more education quickly. So what about that – are they going to extend the free period for these first up students. Perhaps after this they should do the means test bit – I say that, knowing a child from a 'poor' family who never got the full allowance that a mate did whose parents were reasonably well off.

        And the post grad students need looking after. I fear that cutting away help to them, was because the emphasis has been on bringing in foreign students to help pay for our education budget for NZs.

  8. infused 8

    Micky, you're the gift that keeps giving on here.

    This was a bad policy. It was middle income+ welfare, which is not needed.

    • SPC 8.1

      Three strikes.

      It's world leading good policy – Germany and Ireland already do it. It's not income. It's not welfare.

  9. SPC 9

    It will be interesting to see if National inform 18 year olds in 2020 – that they will not have two years free tertiary education (2020-2023) if they win the election.

    I'll call it now, they won't.

    • Chris T 9.1

      It will be interesting to see if Labour still extend it

    • Enough is Enough 9.2

      18 year olds aren't really the demographic that National is chasing, or attracts. I am pretty sure this will be a policy that they will campaign against.

      • SPC 9.2.1

        Their global warming policy, their CGT animous and their do little on affordable housing does indicate a general disregard for those of the next generation.

        However they do have a habit of campaigning agasinst a policy, then adopting it. Such as interest free loans and WFF tax credits.

        Will it be no fees tertiary edcuation and the income supplement to pay power bills this time?

        • Enough is Enough 9.2.1.1

          Not if they need that money for tax cuts.

          My prediction is they will redirect Winston's 1B per annum fund and the free tertiary funds directly to tax cuts.

  10. SPC 10

    When is Labour going to enact the second and third parts of their 4 point policy?

  11. Panda 11

    In light of the latest news regards uni students buying essays etc I would think uni qualifications have just been pushed into the irrelevant bucket. I would assume its not just International students.

    • Formerly Ross 11.1

      On the contrary it takes initiative to cheat successfully, just what employers are crying out for.

      • Panda 11.1.1

        Funnily enough you may be right. Although financial means would need to be up there.

      • Janet 11.1.2

        Initiative on the part of the first one or two that did – the rest were sheep following the Leader along the path.

  12. Chris T 12

    "The manufactured narrative has persuaded some in the media. They have bought into the premise. But it is frustrating because the policy was all about generational equity and nothing about boosting student numbers."

    If it wasn't about increasing numbers why did they go on about increasing numbers and budget for an extra 3% of students?

    Hipkins

    "

    While announcing the policy details on Tuesday, Mr Hipkins revealed the Government had budgeted up to $380 million for the current financial year to cover the fees-free policy, and the increase to student loans and allowances.

    He expected 50,000 of those eligible under the fees-free scheme to pursue industry training, with the other 30,000 attending university.

    "Employers have also been calling for bold forward thinking to build a future workforce with new skills to meet changing demands," says Mr Hipkins. "That's what this policy will deliver.

    "We expect the policy to halt and, over time, reverse the current trend of fewer people going into post-school training and education.

    "We have budgeted for a 3 percent increase in equivalent full-time students in 2018, equating to about 2000 extra students.""

    We will see if it is a failure by them carrying on extending it to 3 years……Which Labour seem to avoid saying they will still do.

    If it the extra 2 year promise they made is dumped we have the answer

  13. Jimmy 13

    Whats his next article? "Why KiwiBuild is a success?"

    • Stuart Munro. 13.1

      Why wouldn't it be?

      Housing is not a problem that goes away if you don't fix it. Whatever the initial setbacks, a building program is required and it will be pursued until it delivers results.

      This is not a feckless Gnat government, to shy at the first hurdle.

      • Shadrach 13.1.1

        "Why wouldn't it be?"

        Indeed, particularly given Mickey's current penchant for irony.

        • Stuart Munro. 13.1.1.1

          It's more to do with Gnat stickability.

          Key talked a great game on housing in 2008, but gimped out in power.

          However hard it is to progress housing in the wasteland created by neo-liberal dysfunction and compounded by Gnat corruption and incompetence, it must be done.

          And a government, as opposed to a pack of rabid reptilians, is obliged to persevere through the difficult stages until they achieve results. The Nick Smith or 'Claytons option' is not an option for government.

          • Shadrach 13.1.1.1.1

            "However hard it is to progress housing in the wasteland created by neo-liberal dysfunction "

            And yet Labour has gone with the begging bowl to private enterprise to deliver the houses they promised to build! Funny that.

            Labour had 9 years in opposition to formulate a workable solution. They failed, and are failing. That is why Mickey's post can only be a work of irony. There is no other logical explanation.

            • Stuart Munro. 13.1.1.1.1.1

              Tain't over yet buttercup.

              • Shadrach

                Kiwibuild is well and truly 'over'. A 'rebranding' awaits, following the 'recalibration'. Just as well our PM knows all these buzzwords to use to excuse her governments failure.

  14. SpaceMonkey 14

    Seems to me that vocational training (awful term) is needed in NZ at the moment (and foreseeable future) more than University commerce and legal graduates.

  15. A 15

    If your goal was to reduce the amount of student loans it would make more sense to wipe one years worth of fees after the successful completion of tertiary study.

    What makes up 49.8% of the US government assets? Student loans.

    https://goldsilver.com/blog/half-of-total-us-government-assets-arestudent-loan-receivables/

    This stupid get-into-debt to become employable scheme started in the US in the 1980’s. They still chase debt from the 1980s and 90s even though the students clearly didn’t realise enough income to justify their “investment” because it cannot be discharged in bankruptcy.

    • SPC 15.1

      One option is to extend the scheme to writing off existing tertiary debt – something we should certainly do for teachers and nurses. First not require repayment and write-off the principal 10% per annum.

      • Janet 15.1.1

        Could we also make that apply to people who paid fees for courses. that failed to finally get NZQA qualifications, which meant they could not go onto teacher training as stipulated in the prospectus of the day.

    • Shadrach 15.2

      "What makes up 49.8% of the US government assets? Student loans. "

      Just to clarify, the article you refer to talks about Financial Assets only, not total US Government Assets. The distinction is important, particularly as you use the dta to justify the claims in your final paragraph.

      Total student debt in the US is around US$1.56t (https://studentloanhero.com/student-loan-debt-statistics/), and the US has assets of around US$270t.

      While I agree with the sentiments of your first paragraph, student loans are a good way of holding students accountable for choosing an educational pathway that will ultimately be self funding via employment.

  16. mosa 16

    " The manufactured narrative has persuaded some in the media "

    The media don't need persuading they are inherently bias of anything that is not National policy.

    • Panda 16.1

      Agreed mainly. Although I wondered if it was due to the fact it was easy to get reports from blogger Cam in the day and made for lazy journalism habits and now its a case of actively having to look. Not one word on the rebuilding up of stock from State housing being just one I would like to hear about. A quick look at comment sections on news shows a very misinformed amount of people if you can wade through overseas accounts and multi ID trolls. Even when a story appears accurate the comprehension gets lost. Too many Uni grads with money?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Government funding to fight infectious diseases
    $36 million for research into Covid-19 and other infectious diseases The investment will improve our readiness for future pandemics Research will focus on prevention, control, and management of infectious diseases The Government’s investing in a new Infectious Diseases Research Platform to boost Aotearoa New Zealand’s Covid-19 response and preparedness for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Quarantine-free travel with Australia to remain suspended for a further 8 weeks
    Suspension to be reviewed again mid to late November Decision brought forward to enable access from Australia to first tranche of around 3000 rooms in MIQ Air New Zealand working at pace to put on more flights from Australia from October    The suspension of quarantine-free travel (QFT) with Australia has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Extra support for Ethnic Communities to share vaccination information
    Extra support is being made available to Ethnic Communities to help them share COVID-19 vaccination information within their communities, Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “We know we need to get every eligible person in New Zealand vaccinated. A fund being launched today will allow for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • School holidays remain unchanged for Auckland region
    School holidays in Auckland will continue to be held at the same time as the rest of the country, starting from Saturday, 2 October, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I’ve carefully considered advice on the implications of shifting the dates and concluded that on balance, maintaining the status quo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government continues crackdown on gangs and organised crime
    Operation Tauwhiro extended until March 2022 Since it was launched in February, Operation Tauwhiro has resulted in:   987 firearms seized $4.99 million in cash seized 865 people charged with a firearms-related offence Gangs and organised crime groups will continue to be relentlessly targeted with the extension of Police’s successful ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech to Body Positive 'HIV Treatments Update Seminar 2021'
    E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I te kaupapa o te rā. Nō reira tēnā koutou katoa Acknowledgements It’s a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • NZ economy’s strong momentum will support rebound from Delta outbreak; COVID fund replenished
    The economy showed strong momentum in the period leading up to the recent Delta COVID-19 outbreak, which bodes well for a solid economic rebound, Grant Robertson said. GDP rose 2.8 percent in the June quarter, following on from a 1.4 percent increase in the previous March quarter. This was a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Projects create benefits into the future
    Making a well-known lake swimmable and helping to halt the decline of the endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguins are among a suite of new projects being supported by the Government’s Jobs for Nature programme across the southern South Island, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “It’s no secret that many of our most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Opening statement for Whāriki Indigenous Small Business Roundtable
      Kei ngā tōpito e wha o te āo e rere ana te mihi maioha ki a koutou nō tawhiti, nō tata mai e tāpiri ana ki tēnei taumata kōrero mo te ao hokohoko arā mā ngā pākihi mo ngā iwi taketake Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa – Pai Mārire.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New members appointed to Kāpuia
    The Government is adding four additional members to Kāpuia, the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “I’m looking forward to having Pamela MacNeill, Huia Bramley, Melani Anae and Katherine Dedo  join Kāpuia and contribute to this group’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Timeline confirmed for Emissions Reductions Plan
    Cabinet has agreed to begin consulting on the Emissions Reduction Plan in early October and require that the final plan be released by the end of May next year in line with the 2022 Budget, the Minister of Climate Change, James Shaw confirmed today. “Cabinet’s decision allows organisations and communities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pay parity pathway for early learning teachers confirmed
    Pay parity conditions and higher funding rates for education and care services will come into force on 1 January, 2022, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government signalled this work in Budget 2021. “From 1 January, 2022, centres opting into the scheme will receive government funding and be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech to the New Zealand Nurses Organisation Conference 2021
    Kia Ora tatau katoa.   Ka tuku mihi ki nga nēhi, He pou Hauora o Aotearoa, E ora ai tatou.   Whakatau mai  I runga i te kaupapa o te ra Te NZNO conference.   Tena koutou tena koutou Tena tatou katoa   Good morning, and thank you inviting me ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government investment in farmer-led catchment groups sweeps past 150 mark
    171 catchment groups have now been invested in by the Government 31 catchment groups in the Lower North Island are receiving new support More than 5,000 farmers are focussed on restoring freshwater within a generation through involvement in catchment groups  Government investment in on-the-ground efforts by farmers to improve land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fight to protect kauri on track
    The Government is pitching in to help vital work to protect nationally significant kauri forests in Auckland, Minister of Conservation Kiri Allan says. “Ensuring the survival of these iconic trees for future generations means doing everything we can to prevent the potential spread of kauri dieback disease,” Kiri Allan said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Joint statement of Mr Bernard Monk; Hon Andrew Little, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry,...
    [Note: The Parties have agreed on terms to fully and finally settle the proceeding and will jointly issue the below statement.] At the heart of this litigation are the lives of the 29 men tragically lost at the Pike River mine on 19 November 2010 and to whom we pay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More financial support for businesses
    Today’s decision to keep Auckland in a higher COVID Alert Level triggers a third round of the Wage Subsidy Scheme which will open for applications at 9am this Friday. “The revenue test period for this payment will be the 14th to the 27th of September. A reminder that this is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Aotearoa New Zealand provides further humanitarian support for Afghanistan
    Aotearoa New Zealand is providing a further $3 million in humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today.  “There is significant humanitarian need in Afghanistan, with the crisis disproportionately affecting women and girls,” said Nanaia Mahuta. The UN has estimated that 80% of the quarter of a million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Innovative te reo prediction tool announced in Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori
    A new Māori language prediction tool will play a key role in tracking our te reo Māori revitalisation efforts, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. He Ara Poutama mō te reo Māori (He Ara Poutama) can forecast the number of conversational and fluent speakers of te reo Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further Government support for people to access food and essential items
    The Government is responding to need for support in Auckland and has committed a further $10 million to help people access ongoing food and other essential items, Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni announced today. This latest tranche is targeted at the Auckland region, helping providers and organisations to distribute ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Half a million Pfizer vaccines from Denmark
    The Government has secured an extra half a million doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines from Denmark that will start arriving in New Zealand within days, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “This is the second and larger agreement the Government has entered into to purchase additional vaccines to meet the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Inland Revenue providing essential COVID support for businesses
    Inland Revenue is seeing increased demand for Resurgence Support Payments and other assistance schemes that it administers, but is processing applications quickly, Revenue Minister David Parker said today. David Parker said the Resurgence Support Payment, the Small Business Cashflow (loan) Scheme and the Wage Subsidy are available at the same ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand marks 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks
    New Zealand is expressing unity with all victims, families and loved ones affected by the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks, and all terrorist attacks around the world since, including in New Zealand. “Saturday marks twenty years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, which killed nearly 3,000 people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to SPREP Environment Ministers
    Talofa Honourable Ulu of Tokelau Faipule Kelihiano Kalolo Tēnā koutou katoa and warm Pacific greetings from Aotearoa to your excellencies, ladies and gentlemen. The new science released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on 8 August paints an alarming picture of the projected impacts of climate change on the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Additional Resurgence Support Payments to support business
    Businesses affected by higher Alert Levels will be able to apply for further Resurgence Support Payments (RSP). “The Government’s RSP was initially intended as a one-off payment to help businesses with their fixed costs, such as rent. Ministers have agreed to provide additional payments to recognise the effects of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More Dawn Raids scholarships announced
    Details of the ‘Manaaki New Zealand Short Term Training Scholarships’, a goodwill gesture that follows the Government’s apology for the Dawn Raids of the 1970s, were released today by Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. “These scholarships that are targeted to the Pacific will support the kaupapa of the Dawn Raids’ ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • One-way quarantine-free travel for RSE workers starting in October
      One-way quarantine-free travel for Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) workers from Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu starts in October New requirement for RSE workers to have received their first vaccination pre-departure, undertake Day 0 and Day 5 tests, and complete a self-isolation period of seven days, pending a negative Day 5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt boosts Pacific suicide prevention support
    Applications have opened for the Pacific Suicide Prevention Community Fund as the Government acts to boost support amid the COVID delta outbreak. “We know strong and connected families and communities are the most important protective factor against suicide and this $900,000 fund will help to support this work,” Health Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt parks the expiry of licenses, WoFs and regos
    As a result of the Delta outbreak, driver licences, Warrants of Fitness (WoFs), Certificates of Fitness (CoFs), vehicle licences (‘regos’) and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will be valid until 30 November 2021, Transport Minister Michael Wood has announced today. “While this extension won’t officially ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • COVID-19 community fund to provide support for vulnerable women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced a $2 million community fund that will provide support for women and girls adversely affected by COVID-19. “We know that women, particularly those who are already vulnerable, are disproportionally affected by the kind of economic disruption caused by COVID-19,” Jan Tinetti said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Next phase of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response announced
    A further NZ$12 million of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response has been announced by Foreign Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today. The package builds on previous tranches of assistance Aotearoa New Zealand has provided to Fiji, totalling over NZ$50 million. “Fiji remains in a very challenging position in their response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Robotic asparagus harvester aimed at addressing industry challenges
    The Government is backing a $5 million project to develop a commercial-scale autonomous robotic asparagus harvester, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. The Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund (SFF Futures) is contributing $2.6 million to the project. Project partner Robotics Plus Limited (RPL) will build on a prototype asparagus ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional Pfizer vaccines to arrive tomorrow
    More than a quarter of a million additional doses of the Pfizer vaccine are on their way from Spain to New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. The additional doses will arrive in Auckland on Friday morning to help meet the current surge in demand for vaccination. “It’s been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Young people to have their voices heard in Youth Parliament 2022
    The dates and details for Youth Parliament 2022 have been announced today by Minister for Youth Priyanca Radhakrishnan, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Youth Parliament is an opportunity for 141 young people from across Aotearoa New Zealand to experience the political process and learn how government works. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Boosting support for tertiary students affected by COVID-19
    Students facing a hard time as a result of COVID-19 restrictions will continue to be supported,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government is putting a further $20 million into the Hardship Fund for Learners, which will help around 15,000 students to stay connected to their studies and learning. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • COVID-19: Immediate relief available for Māori and iwi organisations
    The Government has reprioritised up to $5 million to provide immediate relief to vulnerable whānau Māori and communities during the current COVID-19 outbreak Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The COVID-19 2021 Whānau Recovery Fund will support community-driven, local responses to gaps in access and provision of critical ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New beef genetics programme to deliver cows with smaller environmental hoof-print
    The Government is backing a genetics programme to lower the beef sector’s greenhouse gas emissions by delivering cows with a smaller environmental hoof-print, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. Informing New Zealand Beef is a seven-year partnership with Beef + Lamb New Zealand that is expected to result in more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Appointments to the New Zealand Qualifications Authority
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced new appointments to the board of the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). Former Associate Minister of Education, Hon Tracey Martin, has been appointed as the new Chair for NZQA, replacing the outgoing Acting and Deputy Chair Professor Neil Quigley after an 11-year tenure on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt supports residential house building by allowing manufacture of building supplies
    The Government has agreed to allow some building product manufacturing to take place in Auckland during Covid lockdown to support continued residential construction activity across New Zealand. “There are supply chain issues that arise from Alert Level 4 as building products that are manufactured domestically are mostly manufactured in Auckland. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government invests in scientific research to boost economy, address climate change and enhance wellb...
    Research, Science and Innovation Minister Hon Dr Megan Woods has today announced the recipients of this year’s Endeavour Fund to help tackle the big issues that New Zealanders care about, like boosting economic performance, climate change, transport infrastructure and wellbeing. In total, 69 new scientific research projects were awarded over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago