web analytics

Census 2013: increase in inequality

Written By: - Date published: 9:15 am, December 4th, 2013 - 26 comments
Categories: benefits, class war, john key, poverty, same old national, unemployment, wages - Tags:

Yesterday Stata NZ released a lot of data gathered from the 2013 census.  I and others queried the income statistics reported yesterday in the NZ Herald.  Today Jared Savage in the NZ Herald has provided a more comprehensive article on the growth in the rich poor divide, as revealed by this year’s census [h/t Puddleglum].

The gap between the rich and the poor appears to be widening with the number of Kiwis earning more than $100,000 increasing by nearly three quarters.

More than 181,000 people – or 5 per cent of the population – have a six-figure salary, up from 105,525 people seven years ago, according to the 2013 national Census data released yesterday.

And while the number of women on six-figure salaries has doubled since the 2006 Census they make up only 25 per cent of the total earning more than $100,000.

The statistics show median income has increased from $24,400 to $28,500 but the figure has not kept pace with the inflation rate – calculated to be $28,694 to have the same purchasing power.

[…]

Herald analysis of the income figures show a 90 per cent rise in people earning between $70,001 and $100,000 – from 125,115 to 238,212 – and a 40 per cent increase in those bringing home between $50,000 and $70,000.

Of those earning more than $100,000 41 per cent live in Auckland, 19 per cent in Wellington and 12 per cent in Christchurch.

Censes income gap 2006 & 2013

Comparison 2006 and 2013 incomes: income brackets from “loss” & “zero” to 100k +: original graph at NZ Herald

Savage also reports on the way gender differences have changed somewhat since 2006.  There gains in education and in the numbers of women in higher income brackets.  however, this has not been matched by gains in the average wage for women, with women on low incomes suffering most.

Women are a fifth more likely to have a degree than men, but women’s incomes lag behind men’s because women are still more likely to do more unpaid child-minding.

The median wage gap between men and women widened by $1000, with the income difference between the sexes increasing from $12,400 to $13,400. Men earn $36,500 and women $23,100, according to the median income figures, up from $31,500 and $19,100 respectively.

The number of women on six-figure salaries has doubled from 22,824 to 45,294 since the 2006 Census.

In this context, an article today on Stuff shows the inhumane and punitive impacts of Paula Bennett’s welfare reforms.  They have a particularly harsh impact on mothers in rural communities.

A Waikato woman with no car or access to a bus walked the equivalent of a marathon to make a Work and Income appointment, to stop her benefit getting cut off.

Sarah Warren, a Putaruru mother of four who has been on the benefit for the past 20 years, walked from Putaruru to Tokoroa twice in the past month after receiving a letter from Work and Income requiring her to attend a mandatory meeting.

With no car and no public transport available she completed the 25-kilometre return journey on foot.

“If you didn’t turn up they cut your benefit off,” she said.

Warren said she was shortsighted, but did not have her glasses on either trip.

She said she could “hardly see” as she walked along the side of the road while cars and trucks roared past.

After finishing her hour-long appointment she had to hurry home to her four children before school finished.

“I was rushing to try and get back.”

Her case manager was not interested in finding a solution, she said.

“They didn’t care how I got there. They didn’t want to hear about my situation.”

See also NZ Income Survey: June 2013 Quarter, [h/t Puddleglum] for more details incomes, including:

*Median weekly income from wages and salaries (for those receiving income from this source) was $844, up $38 (4.8 percent).

*Median hourly earnings were $21.58, up 72 cents (3.5 percent).

*Median weekly income for all people from all sources was $575.

John Key’s New Zealand: a brighter future for the well-off; more struggle and hardship for those on low incomes.

26 comments on “Census 2013: increase in inequality”

  1. Enough is Enough 1

    An utter disgrace and the shame of this country.

    This shows progressive goverments since 1984 have been a disaster for 95% of New Zealanders.

    I have no problem with people earning 100K plus, so long as that median income is increasing at a rate a lot higher than inflation.

    The reality is that is impossible under the current system we live.

    • Crunchtime 1.1

      You mean “successive” governments. None of them have been particularly progressive.

  2. infused 2

    Maybe the women living in a rural area can move then?

    • Draco T Bastard 2.1

      Probably not. Probably can’t afford to (moving is expensive) and then there would also be the disruption to her children which could cause all sorts of problems.

      • QoT 2.1.1

        Draco, we’ve already established she can walk to Tokoroa, so obviously she’s just being lazy when she says moving is difficult. And children aren’t people, you just pack them away in boxes until they’re 18, so that’s that problem solved.

    • Macro 2.2

      yeah right!!
      Maybe you think up a better solution to her problem..
      Maybe you could display a bit of humanity..

  3. infused 3

    Ah cool, in moderation again. Wonder what Ive done this time…

    “”There’s no fulltime jobs around here. They [Work and Income] say you might have to move out of town to look for a fulltime job, but my kids are happy where they are.””

    Seriously, move.

    [karol: there’s some sort of technical glitch. This morning a large amount of comments have got caught up in auto-moderation. They keep being released, so I think Lynn must be onto it and trying to sort it out. A lot of them ARE spam]

    • Lanthanide 3.1

      Off topic, but I really think Lynn should investigate a system where comments from well-known (and trusted) pseudonyms are not put into spam.

      Or, let us login or something.

      [karol: Lynn has commented on another thread that there is a problem with the auto-moderation at the moment. A deluge of spam is causing the auto-mod to malfunction, so trusted pseudonyms and non-suspicious comments are just waiting for manual moderation rather than being automatically cleared. He will try to sort it out when he can].

      • Lanthanide 3.1.1

        My point is that if the auto-moderation system goes haywire, trusted pseudonyms shouldn’t be affected by it, because they should be bypassing the system entirely.

        • lprent 3.1.1.1

          That is feasible to do. But it is tricky because of the number of plugins that are interested in comments.

          The obvious way is to count approved comments. But that turns out to be one of the most expensive calcs in the system.

          • Tat Loo (CV) 3.1.1.1.1

            Have a reference table of high count commentators which is updated once per quarter?

    • Roy 3.2

      So you are saying the happiness and stability of children doesn’t matter?

    • blue leopard (Get Lost GCSB Bill) 3.3

      @ Infused

      It is not that easy to move when on a benefit or low income.

      Winz will help with costs if one has a job to go to.
      It requires money, however, to get that job.

      For someone who has a lack of money and a lack of work in her work record such as the woman cited, getting a job is not a ‘sure thing’: not quite as simple as it sounds.

      Even if she could find work, due to the poor rates of pay that has become the norm, a shift from a rural setting to somewhere more urban is not guaranteed to improve her circumstances. Rents and costs can be a lot higher in urban areas. The job has to be pretty decent in order to make a move an improvement.

      There are human factors too which make this a difficult choice, uprooting her kids and losing a social support network of friends.

      Of course moving may improve a person’s financial circumstances however I am merely listing some of the unseen factors involved in moving when in that type of situation – it is something that sounds like an ‘easy fix’, yet is not as certain as one may think, especially with the low wages and high rents that we are experiencing and that have been encouraged by successive governments’ political approaches.

    • Tat Loo (CV) 3.4

      The govt needs to implement a full employment scheme for those 25 and under. Jobs should be provided in or near local communities to minimise disruption to family and social networks.

  4. Wayne 4

    These graphs are more difficult to interpret than a quick look might indicate. You will note a large increase in the top bands, a reduction in the middle and an increase in the bottom.

    There is a 7 year period between the census results, with a GFC and around 20 to 25% inflation and wage increases between the two periods.

    But the middle range of income is quite low, and is probable that a large number of these people have simply moved into the upper bands as their salaries increased. Effectively the middle bands are lower than median wages and salaries which are around $50,000 these days.

    Similarly unemployment has increased since 2006, which would account for the increase in the bottom three bands.

    So some careful analysis will be needed to assess whether they really indicate increased inequality (though higher unemployment will always give this outcome).

    • karol 4.1

      Yes, Wayne I noticed the drop in the middle bands, which was there in 2006 and 2013, especially the 25k-40k bands. It is impossible to know form the graphs what is happening there. But those income ranges are also the incomes of many working in the public sector.

      There’s a noticeable drop in the 10k-15k bracket from 2006-2013, and a significant rise of the numbers of people on zero income from 2006 to 2013. The latter include unemployed people whose partners’ income disqualifies them from getting benefits.

      As quoted in my post yesterday, Stats NZ says the 2013 census shows the median wage is $28, 500.

      Of course unemployment is part of the reason for an increase in income inequality. Your comment implies that isn’t real inequality. What sort of system can increase the incomes of the highest paid, while those on lower incomes can’t even find work, increasing the costs to taxpayers of unemployment benefits or benefits for the low paid?

      Also the graphs would be impacted by more people on part time and/or casual work.

      • Wayne 4.1.1

        Karol,

        The report you cited refers to income not to wages, which I thought as soon as I read your post.

        Income covers all those on benefits, national super and part time jobs, such as students; not just those in full time jobs.

        However full time jobs generate higher incomes. For instance at the minimum wage of $13.75 the full time wage is $28,600. Median wages are much higher, around $880 pw or $45,760.

        • karol 4.1.1.1

          Well, Wayne the 2 kinds of stats show different things. But if we are talking about income inequalities, then the wider picture of those in part time and casual work, as well as beneficiaries need to be included.

          Part of the problem in recent years is the casualisation of work, and the fact that many can only find part time work.

          The figure of “zero income” is also important, showing how many households previously with more than one wage earner have probably dropped back to one wage earner.

    • geoff 4.2

      Wayne, what do you really care if inequality has increased anyway? Doesn’t that merely reflect that those who moved down really just deserved it? The winners win and the losers lose, right? It’s all good as long as it was the market that served the economic justice.

    • KJT 4.3

      What are you trying to say, Wayne?

      Higher unemployment does not increase inequality??? FFS.

      • Wayne 4.3.1

        KJT,

        Quite the reverse, I agree that unemployment increases inequality (which I said, albeit indirectly).

        That is why getting people into jobs is so important, which is why the Nats focus on growth so much. The view is that people progressively migrate to higher paid jobs the longer they are in the workforce. Now I know that is not true for everyone, which is why there is also a focus on increasing skills.

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 4.3.1.1

          “Focus” – yeah I can imagine you all, focussing away. Doesn’t change the fact that you make the country less productive, though, does it?

          Poor righties, all aspiration, no delivery.

          • Wayne 4.3.1.1.1

            What! with just about the highest growth in the OECD, and on track to a surplus you can’t be serious. The country is obviously more productive than in 2009 (the depth of the GFC).

            You can criticise the Nats for many things, but the failure to achieve good growth is not one of them.

            • One Anonymous Knucklehead 4.3.1.1.1.1

              I said “less productive”, Dr. Mapp. That’s, like, y’know, a “comparison”. In this case between National and Labour-led governments.

              NZ population grew 0.7% last year. Economic growth was about the same. You were saying?

            • One Anonymous Knucklehead 4.3.1.1.1.2

              PS: growth for whom? Per capita GDP (Fact: always higher when the Left occupies the Treasury benches) is only one side of the coin when you pursue policies that exacerbate inequality, as you surely do.

            • KJT 4.3.1.1.1.3

              We won’t mention that current growth is due to a delayed cyclical coming out of the GFC, an increase in the price the “communists” pay for our milk, and an earthquake, will we?

              Not to mention getting out of the GFC in much better shape than most countries due to Cullens refusal to cut taxes and Keatings regulation of the Aussie banks, both policies which National would have reversed if they had been in pre-GFC. Just as well Labour was in for the preceding 9 years, wasn’t it?

              I will give credit, where it is due, to National for not hindering recovery too much. Especially for refusing to go towards “austerity” to the batshit extremes of some other Governments.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Select committee changes Kermadec/Rangitāhua Ocean Sanctuary Bill
    Photo by Tom Hitchon Parliament’s Local Government and Environment Committee has made many changes to the Kermadec/Rangitāhua Ocean Sanctuary Bill in response to public submissions, particularly submissions from iwi authorities and Te Ohu Kaimoana.   Read the amended Bill and the ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    21 hours ago
  • Housing map a hit as crisis spreads across NZ
    More than 55,000 New Zealanders have used Labour’s interactive housing map in its first week to see how the housing crisis is affecting their local community, Labour Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “Our innovative map shows the housing crisis is ...
    2 days ago
  • Bridges must come clean about fraud within transport
    Hundreds of thousands of dollars of public money have gone missing and  the Minister of Transport, Simon Bridges must come clean after the Labour party revealed that a senior manager is being investigated for serious fraud, says Labour’s Transport Spokesperson ...
    3 days ago
  • Labour supports Spencer victory
    Labour congratulates Margaret Spencer for her tireless efforts in challenging the Government over family carer rights, says Labour’s Deputy Leader Annette King. ...
    3 days ago
  • US Warship visit welcomed by Labour
    Labour sees the United States warship visit as a red letter day for New Zealand’s non-nuclear status, which is core to our identity and has defined us a nation for 30 years, says Labour’s Deputy Leader Annette King. ...
    3 days ago
  • Time for honest dairy sector conversation
    ...
    3 days ago
  • What next? Dog kennels?
    Social Housing Minister Paula Bennett needs to explain why the Government thinks it is acceptable for it to refer families to live in garages and sheds, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “This is a new low, just when you ...
    3 days ago
  • Banks bust a move, Government possum in the headlights
    Three of the big four banks have acted responsibly by bringing the shutters down on property speculators earlier than required by the Reserve Bank, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “It’s a shame the Government isn’t as motivated to act ...
    3 days ago
  • Latest OECD dairy forecast raises serious questions for economy
    The latest global dairy price forecast shows that New Zealand dairy farmers will not reach a break-even payout before 2019 at the earliest, and will not reach the dairy price factored into this year’s Budget until after 2025, Labour’s Finance spokesperson ...
    3 days ago
  • National’s reckless, out of touch approach to economy exposed
    Today’s economic assessment from the Reserve Bank highlights the danger to the New Zealand economy from a National government that is recklessly complacent in the face of a housing crisis and a struggling export sector, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. ...
    3 days ago
  • GP’s visits get more expensive
      Visiting the GP is set to become more expensive after the Government ignored warnings that people were not receiving access to affordable  healthcare, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “Over 400,000 New Zealanders who should be able to access ...
    5 days ago
  • Farm prices bear brunt of dairy downturn
    The slump in dairy prices that has seen farm prices drop to their lowest level since 2012 and down a third from their peak in 2014 will be of concern to farmers, banks and our overall financial stability, Labour’s Finance ...
    5 days ago
  • Reserve Bank “gets on with it”, National carries on in denial
    The proposal by the Reserve Bank to tighten loan to value ratios for investors shows they are prepared to do their bit to crack down on speculators, while National is still stuck in denial mode, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. ...
    5 days ago
  • Housing crisis holds up interest rate cuts
    The housing crisis that National still wants to deny is stifling the New Zealand economy, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The latest Consumers Price Index shows that all prices excluding housing and household utilities decreased 0.5 per cent – ...
    6 days ago
  • Housing crisis holds up interest rate cuts
    The housing crisis that National still wants to deny is stifling the New Zealand economy, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The latest Consumers Price Index shows that all prices excluding housing and household utilities decreased 0.5 per cent – ...
    6 days ago
  • Govt’s state house sell-off ramping up
    Government plans to ramp up the state house sell-off by selling another 1000 houses in 2016/17 will mean more families in need missing out, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “New figures show the Government plans to sell 1000 ...
    6 days ago
  • Govt’s state house sell-off ramping up
    Government plans to ramp up the state house sell-off by selling another 1000 houses in 2016/17 will mean more families in need missing out, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “New figures show the Government plans to sell 1000 ...
    6 days ago
  • National must reassure exporters on dumping case
        The National Government needs to show our key exporters that they are in control of any anti-dumping case against China before it damages some of our most important industries, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says.     ...
    7 days ago
  • National must reassure exporters on dumping case
        The National Government needs to show our key exporters that they are in control of any anti-dumping case against China before it damages some of our most important industries, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says.     ...
    7 days ago
  • Papers describe litany of incredulity
    Treasury documents which slate the Government’s plans for a national bowel screening programme confirm the proposal was nothing more than a political stunt to cover up underfunding of the health sector, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette Kings says.  The papers were ...
    1 week ago
  • Effect of rampant house prices widens
    The latest house price figures from REINZ show the housing crisis expanding throughout the country, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “We are seeing steep increases in median house prices in Central Otago Lakes – up 42.4% in the last ...
    1 week ago
  • Public invited to have say on homelessness
    People who are homeless, those who were once homeless, those working with the homeless and concerned New Zealanders are being asked to share their experiences and solutions to this growing issue with the Cross-Party Homelessness Inquiry. This inquiry was launched ...
    1 week ago
  • Sorry seems to be the hardest word
    An apology from Hekia Parata to the people of Christchurch is long overdue, Labour's Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. "As if the earthquakes weren't traumatic enough, Hekia Parata and the Ministry of Education then attacked the one thing that had ...
    1 week ago
  • Housing crisis affecting more than 98 per cent of NZ
    Labour’s new housing map shows the housing crisis is now affecting more than 98 per cent of New Zealand, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Housing pressures have seen house prices rise faster than wages in all but four ...
    1 week ago
  • Uber might not be a taxi firm but it must pay tax
    Uber needs to explain how it paid only $9000 in tax when it earned $1m in revenue and is one of the fastest growing companies in the country, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Uber New Zealand appears to be ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Tax changes should have been made 3 years ago
    National could have avoided the international stain on our reputation from the Panama Papers if it had let IRD’s planned review of foreign trusts go ahead three years ago, instead of now belatedly acting because of the Shewan recommendations, says ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must stop state house sell-off
    The Government must immediately pull the plug on its planned sell-off of state houses in order to stop the housing crisis getting any worse, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “While Paula Bennett is putting people into transit camps in ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Thoughts on Labour’s new housing policies
    The Labour Party launched its package of ideas to fix the housing crisis over the weekend. Their ideas match ours in many ways. This is good news, because it means that when we change the government we’ll be ready to ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    2 weeks ago
  • Thoughts on Labour’s new housing policies
    The Labour Party launched its package of ideas to fix the housing crisis over the weekend. Their ideas match ours in many ways. This is good news, because it means that when we change the government we’ll be ready to ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    2 weeks ago
  • Thoughts on Labour’s new housing policies
    The Labour Party launched its package of ideas to fix the housing crisis over the weekend. Their ideas match ours in many ways. This is good news, because it means that when we change the government we’ll be ready to ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    2 weeks ago
  • Housing crisis drives household debt to record levels
    The Finance Minister must be woken from his slumber by Westpac’s report today that says house prices have largely driven household debt to record levels and are rising at a pace faster than other developed economies, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson ...
    2 weeks ago
  • English denies dividend decision made – Joyce should delete his account
    National must explain who is right in the Housing NZ dividend debacle, after Bill English said no decision had been made on a payment for the next two years, in direct contrast to Steven Joyce, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Pressure forces Govt to make policy on the hoof
    Steven Joyce’s surprise announcement that Housing NZ will no longer be used as a cash cow has forced the Finance Minister to make one of National’s biggest ever U-turns, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “After years of insisting the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • 10-fold more affordable houses under Labour
    New data showing homeownership rates continue to fall and more Kiwis than ever rent, highlights why Labour’s plan to build 10 times more affordable housing in Auckland is so desperately needed, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “Labour’s Affordable Housing ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Out of excuses, Brownlee resorts to scare tactics
    Gerry Brownlee’s ridiculous suggestion that Labour would nationalise Christchurch’s east frame shows National has resorted to scare tactics to hide its failure to build desperately needed affordable houses in our city, Labour's Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods says. “Plans put in ...
    2 weeks ago
  • National all at sea in face of Labour’s housing plan
    Labour’s comprehensive plan to fix the housing crisis has left National Ministers flailing about, contradicting themselves and simply making things up, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “Steven Joyce has said in one breath that Labour’s plan represents a minor tweak ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour’s comprehensive plan to tackle housing crisis
    The next Labour Government has a comprehensive plan to tackle the housing crisis by building affordable houses and cracking down on speculators, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “The housing crisis is out of control and National has proven ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Housing NZ to look after people, not profits
    Labour will change Housing NZ from a corporation to a public service and use the dividends it formerly paid into the Crown coffers to maintain and build more state houses, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Housing NZ should ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government breaks rent subsidies promise
    National has broken a promise to subsidise the rent of 3000 low-income New Zealanders to make up for its state house sell-off, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “When John Key announced last year the Government would sell-off 8000 state ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Banks the latest to voice concerns over housing
    The Reserve Bank has revealed banks are becoming “more and more concerned” about the effects of the housing crisis, adding yet another weighty voice to the calls for action from the Government, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The Reserve ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New official figures show DHB’s financial strife
    New figures from the Ministry of Health show 12 out of 20 district health boards have not been fully funded this year to cope with the aging population, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.“The Ministry’s own figures to the Health ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Reserve Bank pleas for action from Government
    The Reserve Bank has stopped asking and is now pleading with the Government to take urgent action on the housing crisis, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Deputy Governor Grant Spencer is clearly deeply concerned about the housing crisis. The ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour to house 5100 more homeless a year
    There would be 1400 new emergency accommodation places – enough to put a roof over the heads of 5100 homeless people a year – under Labour’s emergency housing policy announced today, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “Too many of our ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Chilcot Report shows Labour was right on Iraq
    The Chilcot Report released today shows John Key was wrong to call New Zealand “MIA” over the 2003 war in Iraq and Labour made the right decision not to send troops, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “At the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bigger class sizes on the way under National
    Hekia Parata’s refusal to rule out bigger class sizes as a result of her new bulk funding regime speaks volumes about the real agenda behind her proposed changes, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Hekia Parata has proposed that schools ...
    3 weeks ago
  • National refuses to put people ahead of politics
    National’s refusal to rise above partisan politics and support a parliamentary inquiry into homelessness is hugely disappointing, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “This is such an important issue that politics should be put aside and parties should work ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Minister in denial over Pacific home ownership fall
    As long as the Minister of Pacific Peoples continues to deny that Pacific families have had the greatest home-ownership falls under his Government’s watch, nothing serious will be done to fix the housing crisis, says Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Social Bonds experiment a failure
    The Government’s much vaunted social bonds experiment is a multi-million dollar failure, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “The news that the Wise Group has now withdrawn from the project to develop a pilot for mental health employment services, shows ...
    3 weeks ago
  • John Key must ‘get on with it’, not leave it to Reserve Bank
    John Key can’t just tell the Reserve Bank to ‘get on with’ fixing the housing crisis – he must act to tackle the rampant speculation in the housing market that has taken place under his watch, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson ...
    3 weeks ago
  • No gains for Māori while National in power
    The Minister of Māori Development needs to be honest with his people and admit his party’s ongoing support of the National Government has seen increasing inequality and decreasing prosperity for Māori, says Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri.  “Te Ururoa Flavell had ...
    3 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere