web analytics

Rosemary McLeod on Barbarians

Written By: - Date published: 1:08 pm, February 28th, 2010 - 23 comments
Categories: broadcasting, Media, news - Tags: , , , , ,

One of the best pieces I’ve seen about the idiotic minister of broadcasting Jonathon Coleman wanting to starve or bend National Radio into the level of stupidity that the NACT’s prefer. Rosemary McLeod writing “Quality radio easy target for the barbarians” in the Sunday Star Times this morning.

LET’S BY all means shag about with National Radio. For one thing, it’s there. It’s always there. Isn’t that a drag?

For another, let’s do it just because we can, and because so many other things we’ve tinkered with railways, telecommunications, building regulations, stuff like that have been such triumphs that we can proceed with confidence, whistling.

Having been inflicted with an apartment in a leaky building that we had to start rebuilding at enormous expense  before getting a settlement four years later, I have a distinctive aversion to knuckleheads barbarians of the right fiddling with things that they don’t understand. It appears that Jonathon Coleman is either one of them or that he is being a victim of some sock-puppetry by Stephen Joyce as has been speculated.

Joyce definitely is a knucklehead barbarian in my opinion – good on boasting, and largely useless on delivering anything constructive, and barely adequate on the destructive. Just look at his stupidity on SH20 extension in Mt Albert. Somehow now going back to the tunnel option is going to cost half what it used to. Yeah right..

Service is a boring word. It makes you think of the old public service, when people who worked for the government didn’t get paid a hell of a lot, and consequently didn’t have monstrous egos. That was a regrettable state of affairs. Monstrous egos are far more amusing.

And let’s call National Radio elitist. Let’s assume that real people don’t appreciate radio without ads, and that waking up to Sean and Geoff on Morning Report is some kind of terminal agony for them. Let’s take it that intelligent questioning as opposed to frenetic babbling or raucous opinion is something proper people place no value on.

Talking about monstrous egos, my bedside radio tuner glitched last week. I had to try listening to Mike Hosking on Newstalk  ZB first thing in the morning. Freed from the constraints that used to bind him on national radio he sounds like a total f*cking moron babbling about nothing much. It is difficult to determine where the boundaries are between the advertisements and the news. I guess that the salary is a bit better for Hosking.

But I found I preferred the religious station down the frequencies a bit that I could also tune to, and not in way religious. But at least the guy there doesn’t sound like he put ‘P’ into his morning dietary supplement that he is pushing between slogans and headlines of ‘news’. Perhaps Jonathon Coleman is more subtle than expected and simply wants to make the religious stations the only save haven from the drug-crazed egos of advertisement laden radio.

The weird thing about it is that in Aucklands hyper-saturated radio market, Mike and his show are one of the better news sources – if you remove National Radio. Of course that really shows the difference in level between any radio station with ads and one without.

Like all media, the need to make your running costs with advertisements means that the media will always fall to the lowest common denominator. Just look at TV1 and two. There appears to be a valiant attempt to raise the standard on TVNZ7 (on FreeView), and News at 8 is now the only NZ TV news I watch because it is less stupid than the others. But I don’t think that it last and will eventually fall to endless trivial entertainment dressed as news. As McLeod says..

We killed serious current affairs on television long ago, so let’s follow through with its last hideout. Serious current affairs can be embarrassing for so many reasons to so many people: let’s pause to admire TV’s endless forensics, celebrities, chefs, degrading competitions, and soap operas with tons of ads. They’re a far, far better thing.

It costs $45 per year each for the ad-free parts of Radio NZ.

It is the national broadcaster for potential emergencies like the tsunami alert this morning. If we have a real emergency, then it is the only effective national network that will work on batteries and doesn’t waste them with advertisements

It provides the voice of the country to our enormous expat community overseas who want to keep informed on events back home (and therefore have zero interest in ads). Facebook blocking international signups is why the growth in the facebook group “Save Radio New Zealand” has slowed – now a bit over 16k people on there. If you haven’t signed up then do so.

Yeah, I’m sure that the advertisers and ‘sponsers’ want to get into National Radio’s enormous audience. Of course they will make that audience dissipate. We have more valuable things to do with our time and the literate amongst us will just switch to net. I’m afraid that I have a distinct aversion to advertisements and idiotic broadcasters babbling in the morning. They soak up my valuable wakeup time, and I don’t learn a damn thing.

BTW: There is a protest in Auckland tomorrow.

23 comments on “Rosemary McLeod on Barbarians ”

  1. Rex Widerstrom 1

    I agree completely with McLeod’s (and you) comments on the value of NatRad and the reasons for leaving it untouched. The arguments being put forward for protecting NatRad are very strong. But RNZ is more than NatRad.

    I’ve yet to hear anyone advance a cogent argument as regards Concert FM not having advertising. To suggest it shouldn’t is pure snobbery, IMHO. Classical and jazz stations supported by low key advertising abound. They don’t end up sounding like a commercial pop station, but they do support themselves.

    If people want uninterrupted clasical music they can listen to any number of streaming stations – Concert FM offers very little that can’t be found elsewhere and what it does that is unique (broadcasting the relatively tiny amount of NZ classical compositions) could be shifted to NatRad.

    And I haven’t seen audience figures for RNZI (how many Pacific Islanders even own shortwave radios?) or why we should keep those transmitters going when anyone can listen online and/or RNZ could allow stations in the Pacific rights to rebroadcast whatever they considered appropriate.

    Nor have I ever understood why RNZ should have to wear the cost of running the Sound Archives… why is audio kept separately to everything else in the National Archives? Wouldn’t it be better if curators could keep all relevant material ona an incident or a period of history together? And wouldn’t that make it easier for researchers?

    And since the NZSO survives on a mixture of centralised funding and subscriptions while maintaining its integrity, why shouldn’t those who support and listen to NatRad be given the facility to become subscribers if they so wish? That doesn’t mean such funds substitute for any government funding but rather that they supplement it.

    I’m all for public radio where it fills a role commercial radio can’t or won’t. I’d like to see more money spent on it, not less… more to NatRad and the establishment of a NZ version of Australia’s Triple J, but with a wider brief of supporting all forms of NZ music, not just that aimed at the young.

    Simply because Coleman’s plans are wrong doesn’t mean RNZ’s operations shouldn’t be reviewed. A bit of intelligent horse trading rather than this conservative “no change” approach could offer the opportunity to create something more suited to contemporary NZ.

    • Clarke 1.1

      Rex,

      All your suggestions are useful approaches with potential merit. However the fundamental problem for me and a whole bunch of other RNZ supporters is that changes will be made for reasons of blind ideology, rather than because the service can be improved.

      Let’s review and enhance RNZ, by all means – but would we trust Coleman and Joyce with the job?

      • Rex Widerstrom 1.1.1

        I agree it’s ideologically driven. If it wasn’t then suggestions like mine (and, no doubt, those of a lot of other people) would be being kicked around rather than what’s happening. I’m just suggesting trying to make the best of a bad situation…

        As to your second paragraph, I can only reply… you may very well think that. I couldn’t possibly comment.

    • lprent 1.2

      Agreed on the sound archives. I can’t see any particular reason for RNZ to have it. However also I can’t see the NACT government being willing to lift the budget for the National Archives to do the investment to take it over either. At present I suspect that the direct staff is minimal and the costs are extremely low. Shifting responsibility, the physical archives, and staffing it will be expensive.

      I’d take a bet that the concert programme would require a substantial investment to be able to market themselves to do a sponsorship / advertising /subscription model. The reason why is that it is a really low-cost operation. It is very close to being a semi-automated radio station at present with very very limited staff (unlike NatRad). Startup for shifting its operational model will require that they get a marketing and admin staff at least and it would take a number of years.

      Furthermore I suspect that there isn’t much demand for either sponsorship or advertising of a classical station otherwise there would be some commercial stations already doing it. I haven’t heard any.

      The subscription model would be an even more expensive operation to setup and would take several years and substantial startup investment. Certainly that is the experience of the NZSO from what I understand about it.

      Since I can’t see this government wanting to do the required investment above the existing operations budget, then I’d suggest that going down that route for the concert programme would just be a different way of getting rid of the station.

      The government either wants the concert programme or it doesn’t.

      If it doesn’t then it should introduce the legislation so it could just be shut down and the NACT’s take the rap for it. You could then hope (and I wouldn’t bet on that) that the ‘market’ would fill the gap in coverage.

      If the government wants to shift concert FM to a different operating model, then it should introduce legislation to do it (and take the rap for it) and put in the startup investment to allow it a good chance of succeeding.

      I have no idea about the shortwave. But that is a purely political decision that the NACT’s should make. In fact I’d suggest that right now, RNZ should charge McCullys foreign affairs budget anyway on a cost + depreciation level at least. I’d be interested in seeing legislation to that effect (which the government takes the rap for).

      NatRad is the one that I’m interested in protecting – it is clearly something that the commercial radio is incapable of doing. It consumes most of the non-commercial budget of RNZ. It requires more money to carry on running at its existing level. If the government doesn’t want to fund it at the current level, then they should amend legislation so that it can drop services – for instance by dropping the hours it broadcasts.

      This kind of semi-privatization by constraining budgets is just political cowardice by a government wanting someone else to make decisions for them. Most of the non-commercial services of RNZ are required by legislation.The NACT government should make a decision and put through the required legislation with the appropriate budget to allow the changes to take place. For what NACT needs to do, they need to take the political heat for it – something that they clearly are unwilling to do

      • Rex Widerstrom 1.2.1

        I’m just dashing out…

        Funding the archives: agreed. I think there’d be eventual economies of scale but it would require proper investment up front.

        Sponsorship of a classical station: No one wants to do it when Concert FM is already serving the market ad-free and the market is too small to fracture. Sponsored classical stations operate in many other markets. Sponsorship could be handed off to a PR firm on a mainly commission basis.

        Charging RNZI against Vote Foreign Affairs: Interesting idea with a lot of merit. I have a vague memory that that may be the case in Australia. I’ll see what I can find out.

        This kind of semi-privatization by constraining budgets is just political cowardice by a government wanting someone else to make decisions for them.

        Agreed totally. And worst of all, it denies the opportunity for a complete blank slate reconsideration of the whole model, as we’re doing here. It’s just blind fumbling about with no clear outcome in mind except saving a few dollars.

    • Patrick Baron 1.3

      I have to qualify your comment regarding “…there isn’t much demand for either sponsorship or advertising of a classical station otherwise there would be some commercial stations already doing it”. Commercial radio made a brief foray in Concert FM’s territory in Auckland with Fine Arts FM during the late 1980’s. Fine Arts FM from memory was essentially a commercial analogue of Concert FM and employed a similar presentational format albeit with advertising that was carefully tailored for its audience. Fine Arts however was closed down after 24 months presumably as it was unable pay its way (it was a standalone operation) or perhaps more likely because the license holders received a good offer for the 91.8 frequency. This aside, the point I wish to make is that despite the failure of Fine Arts, what it proved is that as station such as Concert FM is likely to have an audience profile that will be of interest to advertisers. However as you also note the major challenge for Radio New Zealand would be finding a way of profitably exploiting Concert’s commercial potential without incurring a lot of overhead (perhaps via the Radio Bureau?).

    • chris 1.4

      I think concert has scope to become some form of RNZCulture or RNZ arts with a bit of money thrown at it and they could develop a really innovative combination of online and radio and truely create a home for the sonic arts on our airways that wouldn’t really cost that much to either run or setup, it just needs some smart thinking behind it.

  2. Cnr Joe 2

    hear hear LP

  3. ghostwhowalksnz 3

    Kiwi Fm is a commercial station that plays entirely Nz music , but recieves some government funding as the format isnt fully viable yet.
    Radio NZ could drop its lame attempt to play music for under 21s. They could also dump the radio plays.
    And does Nine to Noon have to have so many long interviews with totally irrelevant authors , that have no connection to NZ.

    • lprent 3.1

      …so many long interviews with totally irrelevant authors…

      I like them. It is also something that I don’t hear on any other station or any other media. I find them particularly useful when I’m looking up the authors later as well.

    • felix 3.2

      Not sure what you mean by “music for under 21s” but if you mean the Saturday music shows on NatRadio I think you’ll find they’re more widely appreciated than you might think.

    • chris 3.3

      labour completely fucked up the kiwi fm thing and it is because of that that we’ll prob never have a publicly funded youth station. I still can’t forgive them for just giving that spectrum to a station that is nothing more than a smart attempt by brent impey to stop RNZ adding a youth station. stupidest thing they did in govt., all for a bit of positive press around the farce that is NZ music month

  4. prism 4

    Just loved the bit about Nat Radio being for the elite but paid for by all taxpayers as if it was some luxury instead of the bulwark of a well-informed democracy. That so many people are apathetic citizens or determinedly uninformed because it makes a better gripe, is even more reason to have Nat Radio available to turn to when you are checking information for integrity and breadth. Having any part sponsored even the concert program is a bad move. It is too easy to start snipping here and docking there and soon public radio will end up gelded. It can’t be allowed to be this year’s project to reorganise by some rather vacant politician each time there is a change of government.

    As to the concert program being elitist, that could be argued, but if we are not careful we could fade back towards the WW2 level. Many European economic refugees brought with them a love for high quality European music and culture and got many of our present cultural bodies fired up. I love the Topp twins, country yodelling, pop, rock, but we need to nurture also the fine performance musicians and their music otherwise they may again become a rarity.

    Just thought if Nat Radio had to have sponsorship to run then it could get the suppliers of emergency beacons, batteries etc to fund the tsunami warnings. That would be the logical commercial thing to do. Couldn’t get funeral director ads – that would be tasteless.

  5. ?Anyone remember the demolition of New Zealand’s finest recording studios in Broadcasting House by Don McKinnon, to make way for the grandiouse and palatial new Parliament building these jokers thought was needed to house their egos – which fortunately never happened. Another fine public asset squandered.

  6. Puddleglum 6

    Rex, I have to disagree. My only experience of a commercial classical radio station was something (if I remember correctly) called ‘Classic FM’ or some such in the UK. It had a ‘playlist’ that recycled through the day (I got to the point of contemplating shooting every lark in Britain just to ensure that I’d never have to be reminded of ‘Lark Ascending’ ever again!).

    And your point about elitism raises another pet hate of mine. What I REALLY find elitist is people (often from right wing parties) telling others that its elitist to want government to fund the ‘high-brow’ arts in their various forms. The heavily pregnant implication (not inference) in that line is that ordinary people don’t (or perhaps ‘never will’) prefer the best that their culture has conjured up in the various arts. That’s insulting and completely ignores a long history of participation in and appreciation of the so-called ‘high arts’ by working people whenever they were able. The ‘proles’ went to Shakespeare’s plays; Italian operas were sung by every social class in Italy (they were ordinary people’s entertainment and repertoire), working class groups for novel reading and criticism were widespread in the 19th century, including women from sewing factories in the industrial north of the US.

    What has happened in the last century or two is a slow loss of access, for ordinary people, to the best of what our (or any) culture has to offer. This has largely happened because of the ‘marketisation’ and commodification process applied to the arts with a vengeance and the move to the incorporation of increasingly expensive technology and other systems that make ‘performance’ hugely costly. In that environment, the only way that the bulk of people can access at least some of the artistic ‘best’ is for governments to provide access to it.

    There’s a fundamental difference of opinion here, I think. One view (what I call the marketers’ view) is that people have their particular preferences (who knows why?) and so we’ll give them what they want. The other view (what I call the artist’s – or perhaps even entrepreneur’s – view) is that you have something good to give and so you provide it for people to respond to as they will and you assume that, given your common humanity, what you like will resonate with at least some others. The longer that someone operates in a market setting the more conservative they become and the more the emphasis shifts to the marketer’s view (do market research, find what people want, give it to them). That’s a tragedy.

    Humane and human lives require the time and effort to become skilled in the appreciation of the best that humans are capable of in dance, music, literature and the rest. Ghettoising people, via the market (which, of course, ’embraces’ the masses from a particularly tender age – i.e., from birth), into B or C grade ‘flight of the bumble bee’ versions of the best answers the old question of ‘am I my brother’s keeper’ in a particularly sinister way (gaol keeper).

    • prism 6.1

      Yeah, with promotional and mind training techniques used by advertising agencies you can bend the public’s preferences and then claim to be following them. Also on the idea of the mass demand being what should be catered to, how do people know anything different – if we are always getting what we know – we will always get what we’ve always had.

  7. chris 7

    actually someone on the facebook page made a good point: concert fm gets about the same amount of money as rowing does from sparc. i know what i’d rather have. I think there’s actually a valid line of reasoning pointing out the hypocrisy of govt. sponsored sport vs. culture

  8. reddy 8

    http://www.seek.co.nz/job/community-relations-officer-mining-consents-temporary/rest-of-sth-island/16855178/80/1/

    anyone want to work as a mining consents person in hokitia for the conservation dept?

  9. notTim 9

    “concert fm gets about the same amount of money as rowing does from sparc”

    excellent point.

    and great post lprent.

  10. I dont listen to radio at all but was just wondering if concert FM broadcasts solely concerts and if so does it broadcast hiphop, metal ,punk or rock concerts ?

    • prism 10.1

      Good question. The concert progam would be great place a for broadcasting entire concerts of a wider range of music than classical, also NZ hip hop and other NZ musical ventures – though if you listen to Nat Radio on Sat and Sun afternoons you will hear new music and older releases often with interviews with these now veteran musicians.

  11. randal 11

    rw.
    nowadays the desire to squash radionz is not only ideological but low brow anti intellectualism from the national capons and wiseacres who want everything but know that somebody a lot smarter than them has provided it.
    so when we let the oiks “HAVE A TURN” we then have to put up with this kind of basically infantile resntful behaviour.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Joint Statement: New Zealand and Australian Trade Ministers
    Hon Damien O'Connor MP, New Zealand Minister for Trade and Export Growth, and Hon Dan Tehan MP, Australian Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, met virtually on Monday 20 September to advance trans-Tasman cooperation under the Australia-New Zealand Closer Economic Relations Trade Agreement (CER). CER is one of the most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Prime Minister’s Post Cabinet Press Conference/COVID-19 Update opening statement
    ***Please check against delivery***   E te tī, e te tā, nau mai rā [To all, I bid you welcome]   As you will have seen earlier, today there are 22 new community cases to report; three of which are in Whakatiwai in the Hauraki area, and the remainder in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Major milestones for Māori COVID-19 vaccine rollout as new campaign launches
    Whānau Ora and Associate Health (Māori Health) Minister Peeni Henare acknowledges two major milestones in the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination programme for Māori. “I am very pleased to announce more than 50 percent of eligible Māori have received their first dose and 25 per cent are now fully vaccinated,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government funding to fight infectious diseases
    $36 million for research into Covid-19 and other infectious diseases The investment will improve our readiness for future pandemics Research will focus on prevention, control, and management of infectious diseases The Government’s investing in a new Infectious Diseases Research Platform to boost Aotearoa New Zealand’s Covid-19 response and preparedness for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Quarantine-free travel with Australia to remain suspended for a further 8 weeks
    Suspension to be reviewed again mid to late November Decision brought forward to enable access from Australia to first tranche of around 3000 rooms in MIQ Air New Zealand working at pace to put on more flights from Australia from October    The suspension of quarantine-free travel (QFT) with Australia has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Extra support for Ethnic Communities to share vaccination information
    Extra support is being made available to Ethnic Communities to help them share COVID-19 vaccination information within their communities, Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “We know we need to get every eligible person in New Zealand vaccinated. A fund being launched today will allow for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • School holidays remain unchanged for Auckland region
    School holidays in Auckland will continue to be held at the same time as the rest of the country, starting from Saturday, 2 October, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I’ve carefully considered advice on the implications of shifting the dates and concluded that on balance, maintaining the status quo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government continues crackdown on gangs and organised crime
    Operation Tauwhiro extended until March 2022 Since it was launched in February, Operation Tauwhiro has resulted in:   987 firearms seized $4.99 million in cash seized 865 people charged with a firearms-related offence Gangs and organised crime groups will continue to be relentlessly targeted with the extension of Police’s successful ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech to Body Positive 'HIV Treatments Update Seminar 2021'
    E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I te kaupapa o te rā. Nō reira tēnā koutou katoa Acknowledgements It’s a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Power bill changes bring fairness to charges
    A key recommendation of an independent panel to make electricity charges fairer across all households will be put in place, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. “Phasing out the regulations on ‘low-use’ electricity plans will create a fairer playing field for all New Zealanders and encourage a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ economy’s strong momentum will support rebound from Delta outbreak; COVID fund replenished
    The economy showed strong momentum in the period leading up to the recent Delta COVID-19 outbreak, which bodes well for a solid economic rebound, Grant Robertson said. GDP rose 2.8 percent in the June quarter, following on from a 1.4 percent increase in the previous March quarter. This was a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Projects create benefits into the future
    Making a well-known lake swimmable and helping to halt the decline of the endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguins are among a suite of new projects being supported by the Government’s Jobs for Nature programme across the southern South Island, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “It’s no secret that many of our most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Opening statement for Whāriki Indigenous Small Business Roundtable
      Kei ngā tōpito e wha o te āo e rere ana te mihi maioha ki a koutou nō tawhiti, nō tata mai e tāpiri ana ki tēnei taumata kōrero mo te ao hokohoko arā mā ngā pākihi mo ngā iwi taketake Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa – Pai Mārire.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New members appointed to Kāpuia
    The Government is adding four additional members to Kāpuia, the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “I’m looking forward to having Pamela MacNeill, Huia Bramley, Melani Anae and Katherine Dedo  join Kāpuia and contribute to this group’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Timeline confirmed for Emissions Reductions Plan
    Cabinet has agreed to begin consulting on the Emissions Reduction Plan in early October and require that the final plan be released by the end of May next year in line with the 2022 Budget, the Minister of Climate Change, James Shaw confirmed today. “Cabinet’s decision allows organisations and communities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pay parity pathway for early learning teachers confirmed
    Pay parity conditions and higher funding rates for education and care services will come into force on 1 January, 2022, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government signalled this work in Budget 2021. “From 1 January, 2022, centres opting into the scheme will receive government funding and be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech to the New Zealand Nurses Organisation Conference 2021
    Kia Ora tatau katoa.   Ka tuku mihi ki nga nēhi, He pou Hauora o Aotearoa, E ora ai tatou.   Whakatau mai  I runga i te kaupapa o te ra Te NZNO conference.   Tena koutou tena koutou Tena tatou katoa   Good morning, and thank you inviting me ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government investment in farmer-led catchment groups sweeps past 150 mark
    171 catchment groups have now been invested in by the Government 31 catchment groups in the Lower North Island are receiving new support More than 5,000 farmers are focussed on restoring freshwater within a generation through involvement in catchment groups  Government investment in on-the-ground efforts by farmers to improve land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fight to protect kauri on track
    The Government is pitching in to help vital work to protect nationally significant kauri forests in Auckland, Minister of Conservation Kiri Allan says. “Ensuring the survival of these iconic trees for future generations means doing everything we can to prevent the potential spread of kauri dieback disease,” Kiri Allan said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Joint statement of Mr Bernard Monk; Hon Andrew Little, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry,...
    [Note: The Parties have agreed on terms to fully and finally settle the proceeding and will jointly issue the below statement.] At the heart of this litigation are the lives of the 29 men tragically lost at the Pike River mine on 19 November 2010 and to whom we pay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • More financial support for businesses
    Today’s decision to keep Auckland in a higher COVID Alert Level triggers a third round of the Wage Subsidy Scheme which will open for applications at 9am this Friday. “The revenue test period for this payment will be the 14th to the 27th of September. A reminder that this is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Aotearoa New Zealand provides further humanitarian support for Afghanistan
    Aotearoa New Zealand is providing a further $3 million in humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today.  “There is significant humanitarian need in Afghanistan, with the crisis disproportionately affecting women and girls,” said Nanaia Mahuta. The UN has estimated that 80% of the quarter of a million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Innovative te reo prediction tool announced in Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori
    A new Māori language prediction tool will play a key role in tracking our te reo Māori revitalisation efforts, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. He Ara Poutama mō te reo Māori (He Ara Poutama) can forecast the number of conversational and fluent speakers of te reo Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further Government support for people to access food and essential items
    The Government is responding to need for support in Auckland and has committed a further $10 million to help people access ongoing food and other essential items, Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni announced today. This latest tranche is targeted at the Auckland region, helping providers and organisations to distribute ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Half a million Pfizer vaccines from Denmark
    The Government has secured an extra half a million doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines from Denmark that will start arriving in New Zealand within days, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “This is the second and larger agreement the Government has entered into to purchase additional vaccines to meet the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Inland Revenue providing essential COVID support for businesses
    Inland Revenue is seeing increased demand for Resurgence Support Payments and other assistance schemes that it administers, but is processing applications quickly, Revenue Minister David Parker said today. David Parker said the Resurgence Support Payment, the Small Business Cashflow (loan) Scheme and the Wage Subsidy are available at the same ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand marks 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks
    New Zealand is expressing unity with all victims, families and loved ones affected by the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks, and all terrorist attacks around the world since, including in New Zealand. “Saturday marks twenty years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, which killed nearly 3,000 people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to SPREP Environment Ministers
    Talofa Honourable Ulu of Tokelau Faipule Kelihiano Kalolo Tēnā koutou katoa and warm Pacific greetings from Aotearoa to your excellencies, ladies and gentlemen. The new science released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on 8 August paints an alarming picture of the projected impacts of climate change on the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Additional Resurgence Support Payments to support business
    Businesses affected by higher Alert Levels will be able to apply for further Resurgence Support Payments (RSP). “The Government’s RSP was initially intended as a one-off payment to help businesses with their fixed costs, such as rent. Ministers have agreed to provide additional payments to recognise the effects of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More Dawn Raids scholarships announced
    Details of the ‘Manaaki New Zealand Short Term Training Scholarships’, a goodwill gesture that follows the Government’s apology for the Dawn Raids of the 1970s, were released today by Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. “These scholarships that are targeted to the Pacific will support the kaupapa of the Dawn Raids’ ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • One-way quarantine-free travel for RSE workers starting in October
      One-way quarantine-free travel for Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) workers from Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu starts in October New requirement for RSE workers to have received their first vaccination pre-departure, undertake Day 0 and Day 5 tests, and complete a self-isolation period of seven days, pending a negative Day 5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt boosts Pacific suicide prevention support
    Applications have opened for the Pacific Suicide Prevention Community Fund as the Government acts to boost support amid the COVID delta outbreak. “We know strong and connected families and communities are the most important protective factor against suicide and this $900,000 fund will help to support this work,” Health Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt parks the expiry of licenses, WoFs and regos
    As a result of the Delta outbreak, driver licences, Warrants of Fitness (WoFs), Certificates of Fitness (CoFs), vehicle licences (‘regos’) and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will be valid until 30 November 2021, Transport Minister Michael Wood has announced today. “While this extension won’t officially ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • COVID-19 community fund to provide support for vulnerable women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced a $2 million community fund that will provide support for women and girls adversely affected by COVID-19. “We know that women, particularly those who are already vulnerable, are disproportionally affected by the kind of economic disruption caused by COVID-19,” Jan Tinetti said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Next phase of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response announced
    A further NZ$12 million of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response has been announced by Foreign Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today. The package builds on previous tranches of assistance Aotearoa New Zealand has provided to Fiji, totalling over NZ$50 million. “Fiji remains in a very challenging position in their response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Robotic asparagus harvester aimed at addressing industry challenges
    The Government is backing a $5 million project to develop a commercial-scale autonomous robotic asparagus harvester, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. The Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund (SFF Futures) is contributing $2.6 million to the project. Project partner Robotics Plus Limited (RPL) will build on a prototype asparagus ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional Pfizer vaccines to arrive tomorrow
    More than a quarter of a million additional doses of the Pfizer vaccine are on their way from Spain to New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. The additional doses will arrive in Auckland on Friday morning to help meet the current surge in demand for vaccination. “It’s been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Young people to have their voices heard in Youth Parliament 2022
    The dates and details for Youth Parliament 2022 have been announced today by Minister for Youth Priyanca Radhakrishnan, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Youth Parliament is an opportunity for 141 young people from across Aotearoa New Zealand to experience the political process and learn how government works. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Boosting support for tertiary students affected by COVID-19
    Students facing a hard time as a result of COVID-19 restrictions will continue to be supported,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government is putting a further $20 million into the Hardship Fund for Learners, which will help around 15,000 students to stay connected to their studies and learning. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • COVID-19: Immediate relief available for Māori and iwi organisations
    The Government has reprioritised up to $5 million to provide immediate relief to vulnerable whānau Māori and communities during the current COVID-19 outbreak Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The COVID-19 2021 Whānau Recovery Fund will support community-driven, local responses to gaps in access and provision of critical ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago