web analytics

Non-news News and News Non-news

Written By: - Date published: 12:22 pm, July 13th, 2017 - 100 comments
Categories: discrimination, election 2017, greens, im/migration, Metiria Turei, news, nz first, politicans, Politics, racism, the praiseworthy and the pitiful, winston peters - Tags: , , ,

So the Greens have signaled that they won’t be taken for a ride – that if NZ Labour is forming government, then they have to include the Green Party in the formation of that government. That’s not news. Sorry. Apparently that’s big news, worth running around with flailing arms, and poking faces with serious looks of concern down the guts of the nearest TV camera.

Meanwhile, Metiria Turei decries the sad xenophobic rhetoric of Winston Peters. Now, I’ve had personal experience of Winston’s xenophobic shite. On three occasions (twice when he held the position of deputy Prime Minister) the sad old fart instructed me to “Go back where I came from”.  I was astonished back then that the Deputy Prime Minister of a country was able to stand up in a public meeting, and with impunity address me directly, an immigrant, and tell me to get out of the country. (On the third occasion he did it, he was no longer deputy PM)

Sadly, it seems it would still be okay today. Apparently Metiria Turei is a hypocrite for calling out Winston Peters’ racist rhetoric because her party may have to go into coalition with NZF. Apparently, one is supposed to be polite and ignore such stuff. Better than that, msm seems to have zeroed in on Winston Peters’ claim that there will be “consequences”. You get that? No condemnation of xenophobia or whatever – just a certain salivation at the prospect of juicy consequences.

In fairness, I should point out that some blogs have posted on Winston’s history of racist dog-shit. NRT has a piece on the National Front’s historic backing for Peters and Hayden Donnell at the Spinoff has a “short history” piece on some of his bile. I’m sure there are others.

But my question to New Zealand (if I can anthropomorphise a country for a second) is what the hell is going on in your head when your first inclination is to brush off charges of racism as something “impolite” or “just not cricket”; when you embrace the perpetrator of racist rantings in anticipation of his retribution; when you then, in an apparent attempt to ‘not talk about it’, point snaggly fingers at the very people who ‘called it’, and accuse them on the most specious of grounds of constituting a threat to the integrity of parliamentary elections?

It’s…actually, words fail me. If the New Zealand of this post was a person in a pub, I might be slowly shaking my head as the internal shutters came down and the walls went up. I might be picking up my pint and moving away from their company with no desire whatsoever to ever be in their company again. That would be the possible polite reaction.

 

100 comments on “Non-news News and News Non-news ”

  1. Non-news and news-non-news!
    James’ll be over it like a rash!

  2. RRM 2

    Green Party won’t work with National…

    Green Party won’t work with Winston First…

    The pool of people they can work with is small, and getting smaller!

    I can only assume the Green Party ENJOYS being taken for granted, used and then discarded by the Labour Party time after time after time…?

    (Or perhaps they ENJOY being an opposition party? All of the pay, none of the responsibility?)

    • Bill 2.1

      The Green Party have stated quite categorically that they will work with NZF.

      Nice to see you wanting to wank off on non-news.

      • WILD KATIPO 2.1.1

        Erm… that correction came after Barry Coates had delivered his postings on The Daily Blog, and subsequently was ‘told to pull his head in’ by the Greens leadership… as demonstrated by Shaw when under question from the media…

        * That correction happened 2 days after ( today 13/7/2017 ) two days after the original post on TDB.

        All in all,… a rather difficult situation ,.. still… compared to the corrupt long ,
        long list of National party hypocrisy *, this whole thing is a storm in a teacup. As so many right wingers are so fond of saying ,… ‘ this will all blow over soon and be forgotten as the public doesn’t care’… well, the same could be said about this .

        And no matter how you paint it , – both NZ First and the Greens have many commonality’s between them in policy’s , a common goal with those policy’s , – with the Ace card being – the displacement of the very government that opposes both of them and their policy’s . Whether it be environmental , state owned asset sales or social justice issues , the Greens and NZ First have nothing to lose and everything to gain by issuing a brief public endorsement of the good points of each others party’s thus creating a public perception of mutual willingness to work towards the common goal and also strengthening the bonds between them.

        * Recall Blips long , long list of the lies of John Key .

        The great big list of John Key’s big fat lies (UPDATED) « The Standard

        The great big list of John Key’s big fat lies (UPDATED)

        Then ask yourselves, … is this minor furore that is only interesting to political aficionados and media hacks really worth the effort?

        Take a leaf from the RWNJ’s and see that the public dont really care about political spats like this . There’s bigger fish to fry in the long game than this sort of titivating sibling rivalry.

        • weka 2.1.1.1

          Turei laid out the GP position on Sunday, that included working with NZF if they have to.

          • Red 2.1.1.1.1

            So the Green Party will work with an avowed racist in their opinion, big step

            • McFlock 2.1.1.1.1.1

              aren’t you lot all about pragmatism and compromise?

              Still, better than working with a nat.

            • Bill 2.1.1.1.1.2

              “in their opinion”?

              You saying they’re wrong? You saying Peters isn’t given to racist and/or xenophobic ramblings?

              Check out the Spinoff link for some details if you’ve an element of doubt there Red.

            • Matthew Whitehead 2.1.1.1.1.3

              The Party worked with National for a hot second there on insulation funding. I think it can handle playing in the same pen as a bunch of up-jumped nationalists who actually believe in investing in our country.

    • weka 2.2

      “Green Party won’t work with Winston First…”

      You just made that up. Here’s the actual GP position,

      We will support a truly progressive government and NZF may play a part.

      Metiria Turei’s speech at the campaign launch last weekend.

      https://www.greens.org.nz/news/speech/metiria-turei-green-party-campaign-launch-nelson-2017

      • alwyn 2.2.1

        When was that speech actually made?
        Was the date on the header to your link
        “Metiria Turei MP on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 – 11:54” only when it was put on line?
        Incidentally do you have a link to the speech she made when she called Winston and his party racist.
        It doesn’t seem to be on the Green Party website or anywhere else that I can find.

        • weka 2.2.1.1

          She didn’t call Peters racist in a speech, she was asked a question about his statements on Sunday’s Q and A programme.

          Her and Shaw’s speeches were given on Sunday.

        • Metiria also called him a racist and said she’d still work with him if the public made her back in 2013, so no, this is a long-held and consistent point of view, not something she’s come up with under pressure.

          (also, it’s really funny that nobody in NZ First picked up on it the first time but now they’re acting like the sky is falling to play it up to their base that they’re being attacked by the mean urban liberals)

    • RRM 2.3

      I must be imagining things then!

      Wait, no I’m not!

      http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2017/07/green-mp-threatens-new-election-if-labour-goes-with-nz-first.html

      Green MP Barry Coates says the party would refuse to support a Labour-NZ First Government – and even indicated the Greens would be prepared to force another election to stop it.

      In an extraordinary move, Mr Coates has said a Labour-NZ First Government would be “unacceptable” to the Greens.

      That gives Winston all of the negotiating cards, and the Greens, none.

      • weka 2.3.1

        Do try and keep up. Shaw was on RNZ this morning making it clear that that isn’t the party line.

        See if you can find an actual quote from any GP MP saying that the Greens won’t work with NZF. Bet you can’t. Meanwhile, I can provide you with quotes where they say they will if they have to.

      • “There was this tiny ember, barely glowing but I blew on it and blew on it till it was a fiery meteor of flame – and I didn’t even use my mouth!!”

      • Bill 2.3.3

        Not supporting a NZ Labour/NZF government could only happen if the Greens had been excluded from government.

  3. Why did he on three different occasions tell you to go back to where you came from?

    • Bill 3.1

      Seriously, you’d have to ask him marty.

      • weka 3.1.1

        I’m guessing that Bill got up and asked him some questions he didn’t like. Classic Peters MO.

      • adam 3.1.2

        Sounded different, and asked a hard question. Winston does not like hard questions.

      • Bill 3.1.3

        Well, whatever and what not, there’s no ducking away from being a xenophobic arse-wipe.

        I kinda get your question, but it’s a little bit like asking the woman who’d been walking down the street why the guy that dog-whistled, dog-whistled.

    • Bill 3.2

      I’ve no idea what happened to all he comments that were here a few minutes ago. Just wanted to say, I wasn’t having any ‘holier than thou’ go at you marty. Essentially what Adam and Weka have said. Except that on the third occasion I was just “there” and he took it upon himself to address me directly and throw the same shit. That was about a year later.

      • marty mars 3.2.1

        All good bill. I deleted my comments.

        [Hmm, but Weka’s and Adam’s should have simply dropped to the bottom of the comments section in that case – not disappeared along with yours. I think. Anyway…that’s something for back-end chin scratching] – Bill

        [better not to delete comments when people have already replied marty – weka]

        • McFlock 3.2.1.1

          On the odd occasion that I am afflicted by commenter’s remorse within the ten minute edit period, I tend to just replace the content with “edit:deleted” or similar rather than deleting the actual comment.

          It provides an indication that I said something stupid, just in case there are orphaned replies of indignation.

          edit: I think I started it after I said something particularly bad that resulted in a great string of orphaned comments that threw the entire discussion thread. I think Lprent has improved the response to deletion a bit since then, though.

          • marty mars 3.2.1.1.1

            Thanks. Sorry mods.

          • Bill 3.2.1.1.2

            Good ploy McFlock.

            But how come you leave so many sitting? (Would you would have resisted that one? I just….couldn’t) 🙂

            Anyway, in case anyone’s getting all excited, there were no replies expressing indignation at anything marty had said.

            • McFlock 3.2.1.1.2.1

              🙂 my stupidity and offensiveness arrive immediately. The remorse takes a little longer 🙂

  4. BM 4

    When did you arrive in NZ Bill?

    • Draco T Bastard 4.1

      Why is that even a concern?

      • BM 4.1.1

        Might explain why Bill is struggling with attitudes of some Kiwis.

        • weka 4.1.1.1

          How so?

          • BM 4.1.1.1.1

            Because we were a monocultural backwater prior to 1984 and didn’t really see any noticeable change until we got into the 1990’s

            A large chunk of NZ grew up not having anything to do with immigrants when I was at high school during the 1980’s there was one or two Asians and a pair of American sisters in a high school of around 900 people, not exactly a melting pot of cultures.

            This is why Peters and of late Labour gets a lot of traction with their attacks on immigrants.

            • weka 4.1.1.1.1.1

              No, I was asking you why when Bill immigrated to NZ might explain why he is supposedly struggling with attitudes of some Kiwis.

              • BM

                Thought that would be fairly obvious after that post.

                Because if he arrived in the 1990’s or early 2000’s he wouldn’t have experienced life in monocultural NZ, therefore he would probably struggle with the attitudes of many Kiwis.

                Not trying to justify the behaviour and attitudes just trying to explain why they exist.

                • weka

                  Still not making that much sense to me BM. My experience of growing up in a pretty conservative place was that (a) there were immigrants there and (b) it wasn’t a big deal.

                  Current issues around immigration that Peters likes to push in the direction of xenophobia and racism, are modern ones that arise out of neoliberalism.

                  • McGrath

                    My experience growing up is very similar to BM’s in the 80’s. I remember there being only one Asian kid in High School among European/Maori students. This was Hamilton though, not exactly the culture capital of NZ.

                    • weka

                      My objection to BM’s comments isn’t to refute that he wasn’t around immigrants when he was growing up, but that the smaller number of immigrants then underpins current immigration issues now.

                    • Bill

                      Okay. You sad arsed apologists really need to fuck the fuck right off. How many non-pasty people you think you might have come across in 1980’s west coast of Scotland? I’ll tell you. Precious few.

                      So now I should be racist and my racism indulged because it’s understandable or shit?

                    • McGrath

                      I can see where BM is coming from. There will be a lot of older voters who will remember the days where immigrants were not many. These voters would feel threatened seeing all these new European/Asian/ Pacific immigrants coming in droves and changing the face of “their” NZ. Therefore Winston’a rhetoric about reducing immigration would be very appealing.

                    • BM

                      This, and I think that’s something the Greens need to take on board if they want to deal with NZ First.

                      If they can’t get past that then a coalition probably isn’t a great idea.

            • Sabine 4.1.1.1.1.2

              I call bullshit on your …….. but there were no ‘migrants’ when i wuz little.

              https://teara.govt.nz/en/history-of-immigration

              you might want to read this chapter here

              The end of a ‘white New Zealand’ policy

              Action against racism, 1976
              Much as New Zealand tried to keep its immigrants white through assisted migration schemes and entry permits, such a policy was hard to enforce and even harder to defend.
              ….
              Non-racial attitudes
              By 1971 the proportion of New Zealand’s foreign-born population who were from countries outside the white British Commonwealth was 30% – double that of 20 years before. As the colour of the population changed, so did attitudes. Britain’s entry into the European Economic Community encouraged New Zealand to consider its identity as a Pacific, if not Asian, nation. Independence movements in the British colonies, civil rights crusades in the United States and a Māori cultural revival in New Zealand forced many New Zealanders to confront the racist assumptions in their past. By 1970 a writer on New Zealand immigration noted, ‘This is a world in which racist attitudes, once regarded as perfectly natural and needing no apology in an age of European domination of the non-Europeans’ world, are now looked at askance, even when they are not condemned outright.’ 1

              • BM

                You call bullshit on my experiences growing up in a country you weren’t even born in?

                Christ, the fucking arrogance, but I guess that’s expected with you been German.

                • weka

                  And you think it’s ok to make pointy, xenophobic jokes to an immigrant in a thread about racism. Are you going to be such a dick for the rest of the day?

                • Sabine

                  is that really the best you can do?

                  like seriously the very best.

                  did you run out of talking scripts? No candy? need chocolate?

                  Racist much, but dude ……. i am one of these migrants that you would never see, cause dude…I am White. 🙂

                  you really are a silly boy aren/t you?

                  • weka

                    you probably don’t sound right if you get up in a public meeting and ask Peters some pointed questions though 😈

                    • Sabine

                      oh sorry, but my german accent is never guessed as such. I left Germany such a long time i can’t even speak the language anymore. Much to the amusement of my siblings.

                      but one thing is for sure, i would not get that racism bullshit thrown at me as me in my gumboots, n shit would look mighty white and thus an ‘appropriate’ migrant.

                      Also sad, that all white people in NZ are the offspring of some migrants unless he is Maori – and even then, a lot of my Maori relatives have mingled with pakeha.

                    • James []

                      but one thing is for sure, i would not get that racism bullshit thrown at me as me in my gumboots, n shit would look mighty white and thus an ‘appropriate’ migrant.

                      So I guess you don’t have a Chinese sounding surname ?

                    • Bill

                      Winston obviously doesn’t need a Chinese sounding surname nor even an Asian appearance to wallow in his shit. Thought that would be clear enough from the post.

                • mikes

                  🙂 🙂 🙂

                  (Don’t mention the war…)

        • Bill 4.1.1.2

          I don’t struggle with racism and xenophobia BM. I detest it.

          • Keepcalmcarryon 4.1.1.2.1

            I think some people like the xenophobe tag because it instantly makes them feel good about themselves and shuts down reasoned debate on immigration problems. Not smart politics by the greens niggling Winston over this, probably just an internal branding excercise. Did the greens ( or Bill) jump up and down as much when Hone Harawira wanted to chop the heads off Chinese drug smugglers? Just asking.

            • weka 4.1.1.2.1.1

              There was a pretty big LW commentariat backlash against HH over that.

              • Keepcalmcarryon

                So the greens won’t go in to coalition with Mana? Did one of the green co leaders specifically label Mr Harawira racist when speaking publicly?

                • McFlock

                  Hey, who says the greens won’t go into coalition with NZ1?

                  They’ll just be needing winston to back off from the racist policies as part of the coalition compromise, just as Hone would need to back off being a racist dick and the capital punishment thing.

            • Bill 4.1.1.2.1.2

              Do a simple site search and you’ll see what I said about Hone’s drug ‘solution’.

              “Nice” to see yet another person expressing comfort with xenophobia and racism though and dismissing any political challenge to it as a mere ‘branding exercise’.

              • Keepcalmcarryon

                Use a word too often and out of context and it loses its power, Bill.

                • Bill

                  Sure. Calling shit for what it is, is all about power. Care to explain this ‘out of context’ that I’m missing?

                  • Keepcalmcarryon

                    As just your latest example, you accuse me above of expressing ” comfort with xenophobia and racism” by explaining Turei’s outburst as probably internal branding. Whether or not it was, I actually offered no opinion on the content of her outburst.

                    • Bill

                      🙄 So the existence of racism gets relegated below “concern” about an “outburst”.

                      I can see signs of a second hole opening up beneath your feet. But hey…

                    • Keepcalmcarryon []

                      Let’s discuss the politics of the situation instead of personalizing it.

  5. Draco T Bastard 5

    Better than that, msm seems to have zeroed in on Winston Peters’ claim that there will be “consequences”. You get that? No condemnation of xenophobia or whatever – just a certain salivation at the prospect of juicy consequences.

    The MSM don’t want a Labour led government and are so cheer-leading for NZF/National one and hoping that no one will notice that NZFirts policies are pretty much the exact opposite to National’s and match quite closely to Labour’s.

    But my question to New Zealand (if I can anthropomorphise a country for a second) is what the hell is going on in your head when your first inclination is to brush off charges of racism as something “impolite” or “just not cricket”;

    Is it the people who are doing that or just the RWNJs in the MSM that we hear from so much?

  6. greywarshark 6

    I was listening to Shane Jones this morning and he reminded me of Winston Peters, likes the throwaway line that makes him look like a smartarse. Which party is Shane in at the present?
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/201850922/shane-jones-has-doubts-on-iwirail-plans

    transport politics
    8:20 am today
    Shane Jones has doubts on IwiRail plans
    From Morning Report, 8:20 am today
    Listen duration 4′ :42″

    The New Zealand First candidate, Shane Jones, says the Maori Party policy to resurrect regional rail is unrealistic and farcical.

  7. Sabine 7

    they really don’t want the greens to go into a coalition with labour.

    but i use US terms here, its okay if a “republican”/NZ First/Conservative/National/Act’ does, but it is never ok if the ‘left’ does it. The left has to be polite, always, cause left and shit.

    fuckem.

  8. gsays 8

    My nana said “if you can’t say anything nice don’t say anything at all”.

    My response to Metiria Turei’s comments was poor timing as opposed to the message.
    I get it was a rallying cry, but given both of Winston and Labour’s past actions (going into coalition with national after campaigning on vote for me to get rid of ’em and Labour’s cold shoulder of greens last time round) it seemed I’ll advised.

    • That’s not good enough for our leaders, Gsays. Sometimes you have to call someone out when their rhetoric is a problem and damaging the nation’s values, and honestly, Peters reached that point well before 2013 when Meyt first publicly called his policies and rhetoric racist.

      It is absolutely a social fallacy that failing to confront a problem makes it better. I know as someone who routinely struggles not to commit it. It is better to be honest about a difference in values and come to a place where you can work together. I also think a bit of rhetorical distance between the Greens and NZ First is great for everyone involved, so long as the hurt feelings can be smoothed over, as NZ First will get more votes from conservatives thinking they’re under attack, and the Greens will get more votes for smacking down Winston a little with a well-justified attack. Besides, telling someone they’re saying or doing something isn’t “not being nice.” It’s the equivalent of saying “no, you can’t keep punching people, it’s wrong.”

      And besides, the three parties can absolutely get to a place where the three can agree. It actually does exist, the exchange would go something like this:

      Greens: “Yes, OK, there need to be reasonable limits on migration so that we don’t exceed the country’s carrying capacity. Just don’t make net migration 1% of population or we’ll look stupid.”
      NZ First: “Yes, I suppose a higher figure than that could still suit our nationalist agenda, only we need to make it strictly in jobs kiwis can’t already do.”
      Greens: “Seems pretty fair to people already here, whether they’re born here or earlier immigrants. Also, we want to look after them when they’re here, make applying a bit easier and faster, and they can’t all be white.”
      NZ First: “Yes they can.”
      Labour: “Come on, Winston. You’re not even white yourself.”
      NZ First: “We agree if you never remind the alt-right of that fact in public.”

      😉

      • gsays 8.1.1

        Yep, fair call I suppose.
        I am always asking leaders to lead, not follow polling or being afraid of scaring the horses.

        Still that time, no matter how brief, could be spent examining the common ground.

        • Trust me, they’re doing that too, it’s just that you don’t see them working together in private. This is why Martin had a big tirade about all their months working together. (I don’t know why she’s upset, she seems to be the only one in the party with a head on her shoulders, even if it is a conservative one, and she should be the first to see that they have some work to do around changing their rhetoric so that people actually believe them when they protest that they’re not trying to be racist)

      • Pat 8.1.2

        “I also think a bit of rhetorical distance between the Greens and NZ First is great for everyone involved, so long as the hurt feelings can be smoothed over, as NZ First will get more votes from conservatives thinking they’re under attack, and the Greens will get more votes for smacking down Winston a little with a well-justified attack.”

        or they could both be dismissed as self serving and disinterested in the needs of the electorate and reduce their potential support….hello missing 1.5 million.

        • Possibly. I hope not, as the Greens really exist to do nothing but support the needs of the electorate, and they’re quite open to reversing course if they get public feedback. If you still feel that way about them, I’d strongly suggest writing a letter to Meyt. (She reads every single thing I send her, so I try not to take up her time usually <..>)

          Now, Winston, I completely agree with you about.

        • Bill 8.1.2.2

          Calling out xenophobia and racism is never about timing and never a bad thing and (I fail to see how) ever self serving.

          • Pat 8.1.2.2.1

            that would depend upon the motivation

            • Matthew Whitehead 8.1.2.2.1.1

              Why?

              Of what actual relevance is someone’s motivation so long as they walk the walk?

              I believe that the Greens are motivated to do this for the right reason, but even if you don’t, it’s enough that this is an opinion they have put out there publicly and consistently for several years now.

  9. Sabine 9

    @ James
    but one thing is for sure, i would not get that racism bullshit thrown at me as me in my gumboots, n shit would look mighty white and thus an ‘appropriate’ migrant.

    So I guess you don’t have a Chinese sounding surname ?

    worse, my name is unpronounceable. I am from and area we jokingly call bavarian kongo (Schwarz Bayern – and yes that is now a days considered racist) and we speak in vowels only. So the Chinese have something to me, their surnames you can pronounce.

    and as for your dig, pointing out that in a sales sheet most sales seem to be going to one ethnic group rather then a mixture of various group of people is called statistics. Like you know Chinese buyers, Maori buyers, Pacific Islander buyers and so on. So yeah, i am forever grateful that Phil Twyford went there and pointed out what has been said for a long time, namely that Auckland is being bought not by New Zealanders of every stripe and color, but by a very distinguished group of people from overseas, and now we have a registry that keeps track of real estate transaction to foreigners that. Good ey?
    That way, racists can look to statistics. A bit like with BM who can’t see the migrants that look like him but only sees the migrants that don’t look like him.

    • …worse, my name is unpronounceable. I am from and area we jokingly call bavarian kongo (Schwarz Bayern – and yes that is now a days considered racist) …

      When I was working in Hamburg in the mid-90s I asked one of my colleagues about a hated manager’s incomprehensible (to me) sueddeutsche accent. “Is he Austrian or something?” I asked “Oh, it’s even worse than that,” said the Hamburger – “he’s from Bavaria.”

      • Sabine 9.1.1

        hahahah

        yep, s’true. we’s not german, we’s bavarian. that’s what people always get wrong 🙂

  10. Wayne 10

    Bill,

    Comparing Winston Peter to apartheid South Africa, as you impliedly do in the “teaser” to this item has got to be one of the stupidest things you have done.

    Whatever you might say about Winston, that is a truly ridiculous comparison.

    It just goes to show how much you are divorced from mainstream politics in New Zealand when you think it reasonable to make such an allegation.

    Though no doubt in your world New Zealand is essentially a racist country, up there with the worst of them.

    • Bill 10.1

      No. I made comparisons in terms of media reactions/priorities. I made no comparison in relation to Winston Peters at all. Pretty shoddy straw thingee there Wayne.

      NZ essentially racist and up there with the worst of them?

      I wouldn’t say that. As I’ve said before on more than one occasion though, it’s the most racist country I’ve experienced.

      Now, any chance you might want to engage with the post’s main topic?

      • Red 10.1.1

        You obviously hang around with the wrong people if nz is the most racist country you have experienced or not travelled widely Your statement is outlandish but hey your free to believe it but belief does not make it so Wayne is spot on

        • Bill 10.1.1.1

          It’s my experience Red. Nothing outlandish about it. Maybe you’ve just cocooned yourself? Are otherwise just blind to it? Something else?

          Whatever, you’re previous comment suggesting it’s only the Greens “opinion” that Winston is racist/xenophobic suggests you’re not exactly the ‘go to’ person for understanding or recognising that shit.

          • Matthew Whitehead 10.1.1.1.1

            OK, I’ll bite. New Zealand has some fair problems but it’s actually one of the less racist countries I’ve been to. That’s not to say that racism still isn’t bloody everywhere here, and it’s not exactly easy being visibly brown in any shade, especially in Christchurch, but I never felt like Kiwi racism had the same institutional power as in the UK, or USA, and anti-immigrant rhetoric isn’t as powerful or acceptable here as it was in Germany. And don’t get me started on Aussie, which has a bit of all the worst of all three of them, even if it doesn’t add up to anything quite as bad as the unhealthiest parts of the US.

            (It was shocking visiting the monuments when I was in DC, and seeing just how white the crowds were at every monument but the new one to Martin Luther King, where me and my father were literally the only white people. Anything to do with race, whether it was about african-americans, native americans, or latin americans, was conspicuously absent of local white people, it was all tourists)

            The only other country I’ve felt pretty comfortable in in that regard is Samoa, although it was weird being the odd one out there for a change, it’s a good experience for white people to have at least once, IMO. White people weren’t even the second-most common group there, that was Chinese Samoans.

            Now, I don’t agree with Wayne that you’ve “gone too far” with a South African image. We all know they had, and to a degree still have, some big problems with race, but at least they’re largely trying to tackle them in a grown-up fashion, and in our case too, are taking steps to make reconciliation real.

            If anyone has a right to be upset about that juxtaposition of Winston and South Africa, (which, again, is not as unreasonable as Wayne makes it sound) it’s South Africa, IMO. At least they apologized for their racism.

  11. Ad 11

    Here’s the NZFirst immigration policy:
    http://www.nzfirst.org.nz/immigration

    New Zealand First will:
    • Make sure that Kiwi workers are at the front of the job queue.

    • Ensure that immigration policy is based on New Zealand’s interests and the main focus is on meeting critical skills gaps.

    • Ensure family reunion members are strictly controlled and capped and there is fairness across all nationalities.

    • Ensure that there is effective labour market testing to ensure New Zealanders have first call on New Zealand jobs.

    • Introduce a cap on the number of older immigrants because of the impact on health and other services.

    • Make sure effective measures are put in place to stop the exploitation of migrant workers with respect to wages, safety and work conditions. In Christchurch and elsewhere there is evidence of exploitation of migrant workers.

    • Develop strategies to encourage the regional dispersion of immigration to places other than Auckland. Auckland’s infrastructure is overloaded.

    • Remove the ability to purchase a pre-paid English lesson voucher to bypass the minimum English entry requirements.

    It’s the NZFirst campaign conference this weekend.

    • McFlock 11.1

      I’ve got quibbles with one or two of those points, but the main problem is how they will combine with the rhetoric that’s not in the manifesto.

      Things like Bill being told “go back where you came from” (actually, I might have been there for one of them if it was on campus a few elections ago. Not sure), but alongside Peters’ comments, Prosser’s comments, and a few others.

      Xenophobia seems to be a solid perspective well entrenched in the hearts of a few of NZ1 caucus.

    • Bill 11.2

      Yup. Read that previously. Nothing overtly racist or xenophobic about any of that. I’d even go so far as to say that it’s less discriminatory than NZ Labour’s immigration policy on paper.

      But as Metiria pointed out (and the post is also clear on this) it’s about the rhetoric that Winston Peters uses.

      • Ad 11.2.1

        Well, let’s go through those apparent racist claims assembled by The Spinoff:

        Monday, 15 May 2000,
        Re dogs: he was complaining about the live export of dogs to be eaten.
        He’s in good company with the Greens complaining about live exports.

        26 April 2005
        “At this rate, it won’t take long for New Zealand to be unrecognizable.”
        We’re in mid 2017. Are we still recognizable? After only 12 years?

        27 May 2005
        … creation of an “undesirables” category to ensure that those from “dangerous and unethical regimes are red-flagged before they get here”.
        Why is this a bad idea? The biggest meth seizures we have had, have been from new migrants. Exception being the big one that washed ashore for the gangs north of Kaitaia.

        May 2012
        “Drive down [Dominion Road] someday – once you get past the Eden Park turnoff , keep going and you tell me – what is going on here?”
        Is this the best we can get? Complaining about too many restaurants?

        I think the left can’t cope with hearing about race, unless it comes from the right kind of Maori. Hone Harawira. Now there’s a guy who is a stone cold racist. But if it comes from a different kind of Maori, Winston Peters, we’re straight to clutching our pearls.

        If Winston does get anywhere near to Don Brash’s Orewa speech of 2008, that will be worth re-evaluating. He hasn’t come close. There’s no “ecc sanguis non in arena sed per vias fluebat”, or “river of blood” phrasing. We are a long, long way from Queensland politics, let alone English or U.S. politics. I think where’re just a bit too squeamish.

        Winston is simply stating a natural consequence of the globalization that you fear Bill: accelerated cultural change.

        The left are fine to talk about all the other kinds of negative consequences of globalization: capital flight, environmental degradation, predatory corporations, labour mobility. But Marx was weak on the consequences of all of that upon cultures. Winston is right to name it.

  12. Janet 12

    National must GO! But unless Labour, Values and NZF start to solidly team up as a responsible, inspiring and workable coalition soon I will be looking elsewhere to place my vote. . TOP

    • weka 12.1

      voting TOP is unlikely to change the government. Like NZF, TOP could choose National instead of L/G. It’s also doubtful that they will get 5%, which means your vote that would otherwise have helped change the govt would be wasted.

      Labour and the Greens are working well together.

    • adam 12.2

      TOP is a drunk punch liberal experience.

  13. Chris 13

    The MOU was an incredibly stupid error by the Greens.

    They have tied themselves to a very shaky ship in Labour.

    And the last couple of days of mutual ego waving from both Metiria and Winston won’t exactly fill the voters with confidence that putting this mix in won’t be very very ugly.

    I also question Little’s staying out of it and not standing up and making himself look like a leader by publicly telling them to pull their heads in.

    It looks weak

    • weka 13.1

      Little isn’t the boss of the Greens or NZF though. It’s not really any of his business.

      The MoU tells voters that there is a progressive coalition in waiting. Without it, there would be little for swing voters to trust. How does this harm the Greens when there are literally no other government options than being with Labour?

      • Chris 13.1.1

        He is supposed to be the boss if Labour becomes PM

        It harms them because when it comes to negotiations after the election, any strong arming the Greens do to make Labour tweak policy more in line with theirs carries zero backing it up.

        Look at Winston

        He can demand what ever he wants and he can still go with whoever gives it to him

        • weka 13.1.1.1

          “He is supposed to be the boss if Labour becomes PM”

          Sure, but the MoU established that Labour and the Greens were still separate parties not beholden to each other. And in a L/G govt there would be a new agreement laying out the boundaries that all parties would be expected to abide by. We don’t have that yet.

          It harms them because when it comes to negotiations after the election, any strong arming the Greens do to make Labour tweak policy more in line with theirs carries zero backing it up.

          Look at Winston

          He can demand what ever he wants and he can still go with whoever gives it to him

          Peters can do that because he’s centrist. You can’t do that from left of Labour. Even if the Greens were into the whole leverage thing in the way you imply (and I don’t think they are), what possible ‘leverage’ is there from their position? You haven’t actually said.

          Better that they do what they have done and say to the electorate, if you want a truly progressive govt then vote for us.

          • Chris 13.1.1.1.1

            A progressive govt that calls each other names and threatens each other with ramifications

            Not a good look

        • Psycho Milt 13.1.1.2

          He is supposed to be the boss if Labour becomes PM

          That’s some right-wing thinking right there. There’s always a boss. Memorandums of Understanding are just a way for the weaker party to live with having a boss, rather than being an actual Memorandum of Understanding. Fortunately, the participants in this MoU aren’t right-wingers.

    • Ross 13.2

      On the contrary, politicians bickering in public is so tacky. By the way, have you heard whether Todd Barclay has decided to help police with their enquiries?

      • Chris 13.2.1

        I know it’s tacky.

        In fact it’s worse than tacky. It’s an election killer if you want to be seen as able to create a stable govt.

        Which is why Metiria needs to pull her head in

        No idea about Barclay. He’s an idiot who has gone.

        I would guess we will find out at the end of the inquiry

        • Ross 13.2.1.1

          Chris,

          Metiria is reminding voters that the Greens have some principles, even if WInston doesn’t. Having said that, I’m not sure it will have much effect.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Bill introduced to support workers with 10 days sick leave
    The Government is delivering on a key commitment by introducing a Bill to Parliament to expand sick leave entitlements from five days to ten days a year, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. “COVID-19 has shown how important it is to stay at home when people are ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Progress on pay equity for DHB staff
    Today’s initial agreement between DHBs and the PSA on pay equity for clerical and administration staff is an important step toward better, fairer pay for this crucial and largely female workforce, Health Minister Andrew Little says. If ratified, the agreement between the Public Service Association and the country’s 20 District ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Iconic Milford Track officially reopens
    One of New Zealand’s premier hikes and a cornerstone of the Te Anau community, the Milford Track has officially reopened, “From today, hikers booked on the popular Great Walk will be able to complete the walk end-to-end for the first time since early February,” Minister of Conservation Kiri Allan says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Support for farmers beefed up ahead of La Niña
    Further funding for feed support services and new animal welfare coordinators will help farmers who continue to feel the effects of an extended drought, says Rural Communities Minister Damien O’Connor. “In March this year, I classified the drought in the North Island, parts of the South Island and the Chathams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Next steps for Christchurch Hospital campus redevelopment
    Canterbury DHB will be better placed to respond to future demand for services and continue to deliver high quality care, with the next stage of the campus redevelopment programme confirmed, Health Minister Andrew Little says. The Government has approved $154 million in funding for the construction of a third tower ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers’ Joint Statement
    The Defence Ministers from Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and United Kingdom reaffirmed their nations’ continued commitment to the Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA), and commended the achievements over the past 49 years as the FPDA moves towards its 50th Anniversary in 2021.  The Ministers recognised the FPDA’s significant role ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding protects health of Hawke’s Bay waterways
    A joint Government and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council project will invest $4.2 million to protect local waterways, enhance biodiversity and employ local people, Environment Minister David Parker announced today.   Over two years, the Hāpara Takatū Jobs for Nature project will fence 195km of private land to exclude stock from vulnerable ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Year border exception for seasonal workers in the horticulture and wine industries
    2000 additional RSE workers to enter New Zealand early next year employers must pay these workers at least $22.10 an hour employers will cover costs of managed isolation for the RSE workers RSE workers will be paid the equivalent of 30 hours work a week while in isolation From January ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government increases support for New Zealanders to work in seasonal jobs
    The Government is offering further financial support for unemployed New Zealanders to take on seasonal work. These new incentives include: Up to $200 per week for accommodation costs $1000 incentive payment for workers who complete jobs of six weeks or longer increasing wet weather payments when people can’t work to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government receives Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mos...
    Minister for Internal Affairs Jan Tinetti has today received the Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mosques, and will table it in Parliament on Tuesday December 8. “I know this will have been a challenging process for whānau, survivors and witnesses of the terrorist attack ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand Government to declare a climate emergency
    The Government will declare a climate emergency next week, Climate Change Minister James Shaw said today.                                       “We are in the midst of a climate crisis that will impact on nearly every ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Call for urgent action on Pacific conservation
    A declaration on the urgency of the global biodiversity crisis and the need for immediate, transformative action in the Pacific was agreed at a pan-Pacific conference today. The 10th Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas is taking place this week across the Pacific.  Minister of Conservation Kiritapu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech from the throne
    E aku hoa i te ara o te whai, Kia kotahi tā tātou takahi i te kō, ko tōku whiwhi kei tō koutou tautoko mai. Ko tāku ki a koutou, hei whakapiki manawa mōku. He horomata rangatira te mahi, e rite ai te whiwhinga a te ringatuku, me te ringakape ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Keynote address to Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand conference
    Speech to the CAANZ conference - November 19, 2020 Thank you, Greg, (Greg Haddon, MC) for the welcome. I’d like to acknowledge John Cuthbertson from CAANZ, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue Naomi Ferguson, former fellow MP and former Minister of Revenue, Peter Dunne, other guest speakers and CAANZ members. I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Expert independent advisory group appointed to strengthen the future of Māori broadcasting
    A panel of seven experts are adding their support to help shape the future of Māori broadcasting, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson has announced today. “Today I will meet with some of the most experienced Māori broadcasters, commentators and practitioners in the field. They have practical insights on the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government to review housing settings
    New Zealand’s stronger-than-expected economic performance has flowed through to housing demand, so the Government will review housing settings to improve access to the market, the Finance Minister Grant Robertson announced today. “Our focus is on improving access to the housing market for first home buyers and ensuring house price growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect Govt’s careful economic management
    The better-than-expected Crown accounts released today show the Government’s careful management of the COVID-19 health crisis was the right approach to support the economy. As expected, the Crown accounts for the year to June 2020 show the operating balance before gains and losses, or OBEGAL, was in deficit. However that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Community launch marks next step in addressing racism in education
    The launch of Te Hurihanganui in Porirua today is another important milestone in the work needed to address racism in the education system and improve outcomes for Māori learners and their whānau, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis says. Budget 2019 included $42 million over three years to put Te Hurihanganui ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government to consider recommendations on DNA use in criminal investigations
    The Minister of Justice has received the Law Commission’s recommending changes to the law governing the way DNA is used in criminal investigations. The report, called The Use of DNA in Criminal Investigations – Te Whahamahi I te Ira Tangata I ngā Mātai Taihara, recommends new legislation to address how ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Wakatū Nelson regional hui on trade
    First, I want to express my thanks to Te Taumata for this hui and for all the fantastic work you are doing for Māori in the trade space. In the short time that you’ve been operating you’ve already contributed an enormous amount to the conversation, and developed impressive networks.  I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Primary Industries Summit
    Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today about the significant contribution the food and fibres sector makes to New Zealand and how this Government is supporting that effort. I’d like to start by acknowledging our co-Chairs, Terry Copeland and Mavis Mullins, my colleague, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fast track referrals will speed up recovery and boost jobs and home building
    The Government is taking action to increase jobs, speed up the economic recovery and build houses by putting three more projects through its fast track approval process. “It’s great to see that the fast-track consenting process is working. Today we have referred a mix of potential projects that, if approved, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Papakāinga provides critically needed homes in Hastings
    A papakāinga opened today by the Minister for Māori Development the Hon Willie Jackson will provide whānau with much needed affordable rental homes in Hastings. The four home papakāinga in Waiōhiki is the first project to be completed under the ‘Hastings Place Based’ initiative. This initiative is a Government, Hastings ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand ready to host APEC virtually
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took over the leadership of APEC earlier today, when she joined leaders from the 21 APEC economies virtually for the forum’s final 2020 meeting. “We look forward to hosting a fully virtual APEC 2021 next year. While this isn’t an in-person meeting, it will be one ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Revival of Māori Horticulturists
    The rapid revival of Māori horticulture was unmistakeable at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy Awards, with 2020 marking the first time this iconic Māori farming event was dedicated to horticulture enterprises. Congratulating finalists at the Awards, Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson said growing large-scale māra kai is part of Māori DNA. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Emergency benefit to help temporary visa holders
    From 1 December, people on temporary work, student or visitor visas who can’t return home and or support themselves may get an Emergency Benefit from the Ministry of Social Development, Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today. Previously, temporary visa holders in hardship because of COVID-19 have had ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School sustainability projects to help boost regional economies
    Forty one schools from the Far North to Southland will receive funding for projects that will reduce schools’ emissions and save them money, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This is the second round of the Sustainability Contestable Fund, and work will begin immediately. The first round announced in April ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Farmer-led projects to improve water health in Canterbury and Otago
    More than $6 million will be spent on helping farmers improve the health of rivers, wetlands, and habitat biodiversity in Canterbury and Otago, as well as improving long-term land management practices, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Four farmer-led catchment group Jobs for Nature projects have between allocated between $176,000 and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Tupu Aotearoa continues expansion to Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman & Northl...
    Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman and Northland will benefit from the expansion of the Tupu Aotearoa programme announced today by the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. The programme provides sustainable employment and education pathways and will be delivered in partnership with three providers in Northland and two ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New primary school and classrooms for 1,200 students in South Island
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins unveiled major school building projects across the South Island during a visit to Waimea College in Nelson today. It’s part of the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “Investments like this gives the construction industry certainty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister of Māori Development pays tribute to Rudy Taylor
      Today the Minister of Māori Development, alongside other Government Ministers and MP’s said their final farewells to Nga Puhi Leader Rudy Taylor.  “Rudy dedicated his life to the betterment of Māori, and his strong approach was always from the ground up, grassroots, sincere and unfaltering”  “Over the past few ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister to attend APEC Leaders’ Summit
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will attend the annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting and associated events virtually today and tomorrow. “In a world where we cannot travel due to COVID-19, continuing close collaboration with our regional partners is key to accelerating New Zealand’s economic recovery,” Jacinda Ardern said. “There is wide ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to Infrastructure NZ Symposium
    Tena Koutou, Tena Koutou and thank you for inviting me to speak to you today. This is a critical time for New Zealand as we respond to the damage wreaked by the global COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital that investment in our economic recovery is well thought through, and makes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Pike River 10 Year Anniversary Commemorative Service
    Tēnei te mihi ki a tātau katoa e huihui nei i tēnei rā Ki a koutou ngā whānau o te hunga kua riro i kōnei – he mihi aroha ki a koutou Ki te hapori whānui – tēnā koutou Ki ngā tāngata whenua – tēnā koutou Ki ngā mate, e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Huge investment in new and upgraded classrooms to boost construction jobs
    Around 7,500 students are set to benefit from the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “The election delivered a clear mandate to accelerate our economic recovery and build back better. That’s why we are prioritising construction projects in schools so more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Keeping Pike River Mine promises 10 years on
    Ten years after the Pike River Mine tragedy in which 29 men lost their lives while at work, a commemorative service at Parliament has honoured them and their legacy of ensuring all New Zealand workplaces are safe. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern attended the event, along with representatives of the Pike ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional testing to strengthen border and increase safety of workers
    New testing measures are being put in place to increase the safety of border workers and further strengthen New Zealand’s barriers against COVID-19, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “These strengthened rules – to apply to all international airports and ports – build on the mandatory testing orders we’ve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • More public housing delivered in Auckland
    The Government’s investment in public housing is delivering more warm, dry homes with today’s official opening of 82 new apartments in New Lynn by the Housing Minister Megan Woods. The Thom Street development replaces 16 houses built in the 1940s, with brand new fit-for-purpose public housing that is in high ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Agreement advanced to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines
    The Government has confirmed an in-principle agreement to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 5 million people – from Janssen Pharmaceutica, subject to the vaccine successfully completing clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. “This agreement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will leave a conservation legacy for Waikanae awa
    Ninety-two jobs will be created to help environmental restoration in the Waikanae River catchment through $8.5 million of Jobs for Nature funding, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan announced today. “The new funding will give a four-year boost to the restoration of the Waikanae awa, and is specifically focussed on restoration through ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago