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Act thinks the IPCC is scaremongering

Written By: - Date published: 10:38 am, April 1st, 2014 - 63 comments
Categories: act, climate change, ETS, global warming, labour - Tags:

Earth climate change

The IPCC has released its latest report. There are all sorts of more eloquent ways to describe the issue in detail but basically the world’s environment is stuffed if we do nothing and there will be extensive devastation unless the human race starts acting now.  And the belligerent anti intellectualism that is evident amongst part of the population and which is stirred up for political gain by conservative politicians and their deep pocketed shallow thinking corporate supporters will mean that any action will be delayed, probably until it is too late.

There is nothing new in the report.  As stated by Graham Reardon in the Guardian the latest report on the impacts of climate change makes dire reading, just as the first one did almost a quarter of a century ago.  And as summarised by Suzanne Goldenberg the world faces threat to food supply, conflicts over water rights and growing inequality.  The only option to is cut emissions.

Locally New Zealand will be facing more and more of the sorts of events that we are already witnessing.  More frequent once in a century weather events, more flooding, more inundation, more drought.  And increased rates of extinction of flora and fauna.  For instance the appearance of Kauri dieback may be in part because increased temperature makes phytophera more viable.  A warmer average temperature is going to play havoc with local ecosystems.

When faced with such potentially devastating events you would normally think that our leaders would take urgent action.  Unfortunately this does not appear likely.

John Key himself is a scientific sceptic. In 2005 he said:

The impact of the Kyoto Protocol, even if one believes in global warming—and I am somewhat suspicious of it—is that we will see billions and billions of dollars poured into fixing something that we are not even sure is a problem. Even if it is a problem, it will be delayed for about 6 years. Then it will hit the world in 2096 instead of 2102, or something like that. It will not work.”

And he is busily engaging in the resuscitation of the ACT party, just so that National has political “options”.

The Act Party has a brand new look and an educated sounding Philosophy lecturer with an English accent is now its leader.  But Jamie Whyte is not going to cut it as long as an intellectual analysis of the issue is required.  Last Sunday he went up against Greens co-leader Russel Norman.  Very clearly Norman wiped the floor with Whyte.  Norman’s clarity of thought compared to Whyte’s muddled attempted populism was jarring.

White’s comments on the issue are really naff.  He considers action against climate change to be “moral exhibitionism”, that New Zealand should not do anything unless a number of other countries also agree and that New Zealand should be adapting not working to prevent.  His attitude is disappointing.  Requiring other countries to all act will reduce New Zealand’s efforts to that of the least committed, when preservation of the world’s environment requires every nation to do as much as they can.  He also thinks poorer countries should lead the way.  Obviously he wants to preserve a first world privilege.  Unfortunately for him climate change will not ignore such distinctions and wreck the most comfortable of lifestyles.

Act has announced that stifling the emissions trading scheme is a bottom line for a future coalition with National.  From Act’s website:

Act’s policy is that the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) should immediately be abolished,” Act leader Jamie Whyte said today.

“Our absolute bottom line to provide National with ongoing support on confidence and supply is that there be no expansion of the ETS until China, the United States, the European Union, Brazil, Indonesia, Russia, India and Japan and Canada take similar material steps to implement ETSs across their economies, including agriculture,” said Mr Whyte.

“New Zealand is well ahead of any other country in imposing climate change costs on our economy – and we are the only ones even considering including agricultural emissions. We should not move any further ahead until the world’s top ten emitters follow.

“We need a responsible climate change policy that sees us move in line with the rest of the world on mitigation and which focuses on any adaptation policies that are needed.

You would normally take such a threat from a party polling possibly as high as 1.4% could be safely ignored.  But charter schools are an example of where National has let its tail wag it.

So this may be the price to pay if National gets re elected and gifts Epsom again to Act, a commitment to do nothing further about climate change.  If you need any reason to work to get rid of this Government this has to be it.

63 comments on “Act thinks the IPCC is scaremongering”

  1. vto 1

    Don’t worry about ACT, their thinking has already been debunked as absolute codswallop and as such all subsequent thinking of theirs must be discounted to the point of non-existence. Evidence includes;

    the mantra of pricing everything, including health & safety. Witness 29 dead men at Pike River.
    the idea that people make life decisions on the basis of self i.e. greed. Witness short term decisionitis at Pike River leading to financial collapse and 29 men killed.
    the idea that self-regulation works. Witness the global financial crisis.

    .. tra la la …. they just spent six years in a leaky boat … tra la la

  2. Pascal's bookie 2

    “So this may be the price to pay if National gets re elected and gifts Epsom again to Act, a commitment to do nothing further about climate change.”

    Nope. This is what ACT will have to front for if they want a deal with National.

  3. Rodel 3

    Norman vs Whyte..was no contest. Norman looked as if he was irritated at having to waste his time pretending to ‘debate’ with Whyte. I don’t think even Epsom / Remuera right wing voters will support this ACT candidate.

    Trying to think of a punnish slogan using the words ,’Hide, Banks’ and ‘Whyte’?

    • Jenny 3.1

      “I don’t think even Epsom / Remuera right wing voters will support this ACT candidate.”
      Rodel

      The truth is that they didn’t last time.

      The majority of Epsom voters including National supporters did not vote ACT, (even when they were deliberately directed to do so by their leader John Key.) Polling showed Banks was trailing Goldsmith right throughout the campaign, he had to beg Key for his public blessing, which was finally granted at the farcical tea party pantomime. The tea party fiasco proved to be enough to give Banks enough support to edge ahead of Goldsmith.

      But even then, the majority of Epsom voters did not vote ACT!

      What really helped ACT across the line in Epsom was the votes that went to Labour and the Greens.

      If the Greens and Labour had not stood candidates in Epsom, ACT would not have got in.

      And remember that this was before the revelations about John Banks Dotcom Sky City split donations fiddling scandal.

      The majority of the people of Epsom did not vote ACT, they are even less likely to vote ACT this time.

      The strategy for the Left is clear. National is more Left than ACT, Left voters in Epsom would choose National over ACT every time.

      • Rodel 3.1.1

        Jenny
        Sorry it has Taken me a while to see your response.

        “The strategy for the Left is clear. National is more Left than ACT, Left voters in Epsom would choose National over ACT every time.”

        Your logic is impeccable and should be publicized more among left voters.
        It may persuade the Epsom Labour friends of mine who couldn’t bear to vote National last time and just stayed home.

  4. Bearded Git 4

    ACT are just looking for publicity which translates into votes. It follows (Micky) that the less posts we have like this on TS the better.

    • I disagree. Not all publicity is good publicity, whatever the naughtiest kid in class thought.

      • Tom Gould 4.1.1

        Isn’t this the guy who figures incest is okay? Alongside the moon landing dude, surely would have terminated any serious or rational political career. But not with our juvenile media. No, these boys are players.

        • Richard McGrath 4.1.1.1

          I think from memory you’ll find that Jamie Whyte finds incest repugnant but doesn’t think there needs to be legislation banning it, when it involves two consenting adults who are not significantly mentally impaired and who are able to access information about the likely consequences of consanguinity.

      • Bearded Git 4.1.2

        The problem is Stephanie that a surprisingly large percentage of people don’t believe in climate change. For instance 23% in the USA on 16th January this year-see this link:

        http://www.livescience.com/42633-climate-change-disbelief-rises.html

        Not sure what the numbers are in NZ but ACT only needs to get a fraction of these nutters to vote for it to get several seats in parliament on the coat-tails of the Epsom electorate. That is why this kind of publicity is good for them and bad for the Left.

  5. captain hook 5

    There is two strains at work in the world today.
    The ones who thik its all ok and the ones who think that something needs to be done and soon.
    Only time will tell who is right but in the meantime the people have to put up with lowbrow noo noo heds maquerading as libertarians who are mainly accountants and know nothing except how much anything costs on the day and how to make people pay up for stuff that they dont really need but have been persuaded to buy.
    The thing is everythng has an invisible cost that is considerably larger than the sticker price and with an impact that is not neccesarily visible to the either the maker or the consumer.
    All these impacts on the environment are starting to add up and will come on like a rogue wave with a force that is irresisitible. In the meatime the ACT crew are still busy using economic power to bludgeon others for the psychological satisfaction that it affords them in their semi-privileged position. However like hothouse flowers when the shit hits the fan the useless and the parasites will be the first to go.
    fair is foul and foul is fair.
    welcome to the monkeyhouse.

    • aerobubble 5.1

      The climate changes. Its nature, natural. When the Earth last had all the buried carbon we dug up and burned circulating in the atmosphere, the atmosphere was warmer, thicker, and the sun cooler (as stars age they heat up). So of course its not maybe, it scientific fact that we’re screwed. Anyway the fact that the uniformity party for do nothing, ACT has found a intellectual without any… …well.. ..intellect… should surprise nobody, we have had thirty year of the uniform lockstep stampede towards dumb that is Thatcherism. The targeted distortion, dispersion and disruption of any contravening contradiction of their economic one true faith, free markets provide like Midus.
      Such free market bastions as Haiti and Somalia come to mind.

      Its unfathomable why ACT is such a stupid party with such stupid people attached to it…. …no, wait, no its not unfathomable, its historical, they are the conservative lobby who want nothing to change and are given money to produce just that. Those with too much wealth and yet to weak to keep fighting in the market to regenerate. ACT is a contradiction of its ideology and its backers, it would laugh at the people who give it money for being saps, probably does.

  6. Act have consistently been scientific morons. What is new?

    It is what happens when you have bullshit con artists wanting to feather their own nests thinking that they know how to think.

  7. One Anonymous Bloke 7

    I don’t think the voters of Epsom are going to warm to Mr. Unclecousin and his anonymous candidate. Say what you like about Rodney, he’s a personable sort of chap. Mr. Unclecousin just looks uncomfortable.

    • Tracey 7.1

      they will votefor kermit the frog if it will give national a pal…

    • Rodel 7.2

      Hide personable? He was not. He was disagreeable, unattractive, and selfish. Even ACT members disliked him.

  8. Tracey 8

    bear in mind ACT doesnt know the difference between the weather and climate. the breadth of their ignorance explains charter schools and aucklands super city… no cries of tails wagging dogs though.

  9. logie97 9

    Key, at a press conference yesterday, indicated that the government is well aware of climate change, and that he personally believes that human beings are influencing it. He went on to say that his government is actively pursuing policies to manage emissions.

    But he then went on to say that in the overall scheme of things NZ is a bit player. When the big polluters take action, changes for the better will happen. He even asserted that he chatted with the Chinese PM over dinner about it. (Wow the things this man chats about (via an interpreter) over dinner, – probably mentions the All Blacks as well…) What would be nice to hear from him is that he has made formal representations.

    Of course Mr Key, as just one citizen of this world, has no more right to produce more than any other person. (but he probably doesn’t see it that way).

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/national/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503075&gal_cid=1503075&gallery_id=142066

    • Tracey 9.1

      internal national party polling must show kiwis believe in climate change and potential impact so he is pretending to believe to get back into power to keep doing nothing…

      • logie97 9.1.1

        Tracey, what was more disconcerting about the press conference, given that Key now subscribes to anthropogenic global warming (not his words because I doubt he can pronounce them), rather than take steps to implement policies to reverse the damage, he maintains NZ experts are adapting grasses that will survive. So as you were NZ. The man really just doesn’t get it …

    • Jenny 9.2

      “But he then went on to say that in the overall scheme of things NZ is a bit player. When the big polluters take action, changes for the better will happen.”
      logie97

      What a cheek, telling the Chinese to do as I say, not as I do.

      John Key ignorantly refuses to listen to his scientific advisors.

      This is what Sir Peter Gluckman the chief science advisor to the Prime Minister’s office says on the matter:

      “The collective wisdom of the scientific community is that action is needed now.”

      “New Zealand is a small emitter by world standards – only emitting some 0.2% of global green house gases. So anything we do as a nation will have little impact on the climate – our impact will be symbolic, moral, and political”
      Sir Peter Gluckman Chief Science adviser to the Prime Minister.
      http://www.pmcsa.org.nz/climate-change/

      As Professor Gluckman points out we could and should be a world leader, his words bear repeating.

      “Our impact will be symbolic, moral, and political”

      Now that would have been something to say at the dinner table before the Chinese Premier to make him sit up and listen and make him think I need to keep an eye on little New Zealand.

  10. feijoa 10

    Tim Groser has been quoted in the DomPost saying it’s not up to central government to do anything about effects of climate change – it’s all for local government to sort out!!!!
    Mind boggling

  11. Bob 11

    We don’t need the ETS, we just need to plant pine trees, it fixes ‘Climate Change’ and has been peer reviewed and all, yay for pine trees! http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26340038
    Wait, don’t Labour want to cut down pine trees?

    • One Anonymous Bloke 11.1

      🙄

      The argumentum ad nauseam. How original.

      • Tracey 11.1.1

        bobs still laughing and srylands has called his imaginary colleagues over to read it.

      • weka 11.1.2

        Reforestation is a crucial part of any sane response to AGW. I think mixed forest is a better way to go in many places, but certainly we could be letting wilding pines grow into forests in lots of areas where we are currently spraying them ffs. That’s some kind of fucked up shit, poisoning trees in what should be a post-carbon age.

        • mickysavage 11.1.2.1

          Yep reforestation would work. The calculation has been made that if a third of the area in the world that has been deforested was reforested then we could deal with the excess CO2.

          http://thestandard.org.nz/new-zealand-is-doing-nothing-about-climate-change/

        • Draco T Bastard 11.1.2.2

          In NZ wilding pines are a weed that will destroy the native forest.

          • weka 11.1.2.2.1

            Those wilding pines that affect important native ecosystems should be removed. But wilding pines also grow in many places where there is no forest of any kind, nor important conservation estate, and where reforestation would be a better use of land. I’m talking about areas where pines are being felled or sprayed and no other land restoration is being done. That’s criminal given AGW. I don’t like monocrop pine plantation so much, but I think wilding pines could be encouraged into multispecies forests. So many benefits.

            • Draco T Bastard 11.1.2.2.1.1

              Like most living things, they spread without control. For those areas where reforestation would be a good idea then we need to plant native forests.

              • weka

                Yes, native ecosystem restorating would be preferable. But there are a couple of points here. One is that NZ as a society is not interested in funding that at this point in time, beyond the bits and pieces we are already doing. So the idea of restoring native forests is wonderful but not realistic in terms of AGW timeframes (or PO ones either).

                The second is that it is far easier to work with nature than against it. It’s true that wilding pines spread, but the reason they are there in the first place is because nearby there are pine trees that have been intentionally planted (including plantation). Unless we are going to eradicate all pines in NZ (hugely irresponsible in an age of AGW), wilding pines will continue to exist alongside other plants and ecosystems.

                Because pines grow so easily, they are an asset in restoring land that has been pushed to its limit. If you look at some of the land around places like Alexandra, it literally won’t grow anything other than pines. Establishing native ecosystems there is extremely difficult (there are good reasons why that land isn’t regenerating itself, some of that is climate, some of it is because of human activity eg overgrazing and soil degradation, some of it is rabbbits etc). That pines will grow there is a good thing. They will change the local environment for the better and in time we could then plant other things more easily.

                I can’t think of any native forest in that area (might be some), although there is conservation estate of other kinds of native ecosystems especially higher up (they have been hugely altered by humans). But most of the anti-wilding pine pressure stems from people’s love of the iconic landscape (the Grahame Sydney effect). That’s important too, but not more important than land care and AGW mitigation. We really don’t have a good perspective on this issue in NZ.

                • weka

                  “it literally won’t grow anything other than pines.”

                  Am going to qualify that. In some places it appears that nothing else will grow now. But in other areas nearby we know that plants that restore land will grow eg broom. Broom is nitrogen fixing, stabilises land, and provides shade for other plants. You still have to deal with the rabbits, but broom is a decent enough way to re-establish native ecosystems. Guess what DOC does on its land? It sprays broom. Some of that is probably warranted in places where there are small native plant ecosystems, but there is also much DOC land where this practice is insane. It’s about cultural attitudes not land care. Fortunately DOC nationally is starting to shift its perspective on this, largely due to places like Hinewai on Banks Peninsula, who have pioneered using exotics as a way of restoring native systems, and research has since been done. But slow, far to slow.

                  If you look at pines as a pest, in isolation, and then target that pest, in isolation, you will use up lots of resources and at best commit to an ongoing cycle of effort and land degradation. But if you look at pines in the context of where they are growing, the whole ecosystem, then the pictures starts to look quite different.

    • logie97 11.2

      … yep, probably at a similarly sustainable rate as at present except that they want to put value added to the product, and also encourage its use domestically. What’s the problem in that?
      No where near as carbon dioxide producing as the steel and concrete industries.

    • lprent 11.3

      Don’t be silly. Pine trees with a life of what ? 40 years growing time before they’re cut down and start excreting that fossil CO2… Transient and irrelevant. They’re be useful if we planted Kauri and left them to grow for sever hundred years. Of course the Kauri ar dying….

      The problem for your moronic grasp of science is that the carbon cycle is literally thousands of years long before the fossil carbon burnt by you today is sucked into a long-term sequestration naturally. Currently humans have NO ability to sequester fossil carbon in any significiant levels or for long enough

      Best idea is not to burn it in the first place and level leave it where it has been sequestered.

        • RedLogix 11.3.1.1

          Combine food forests with aquaponics and there is a big part of the solution.

          • lprent 11.3.1.1.1

            Not really. It is still part of the active carbon cycle in a time frame of decades..

            Basically if we want to maintain climates at anything like their current levels, then we have to sequester a HUGE amount of carbon that has already been drawn into the atmoshere and oceans and do so in such a away that it doesn’t go back into the atmosphere over the next thousand years or so..

        • lprent 11.3.1.2

          Building soils is a good way to sequester carbon, but what you really need is a good flood to lay a thick layer of a fine silt over it to lock it in for a few centuries. Otherwise if it is still exposed to the atmosphere then it will stay in a equilibrium.

          Making peat bogs is better. Problem is that they are so susceptible to climate change causing them to release carbon. Same for soils BTW. You have to be able to store it for thousands of years…

          You have to remember the size and timescale of the issue.

          If we went off and made all of the surplus CO2 at current rates of generation into dry ice before it went into the oceans (bloody dangerous leaving it there), then within decades we’d have metres thick dry ice deposits over most of the land area of the world (and a hell of an energy budget trying to keep it contained).

          The natural CO2 cycle is literally thousands of years long. It hangs around for a long time before it gets stored in shells at the bottom of the sea floor or in fossil “soils”.

          So you have to store it it in something that is inherently unable to react with the atmosphere.

          Growing trees to cope with even a few decades of the fossil CO2 would mean that we’d be covering much of our farmlands with trees right around the world and starving people (who tend not to go quietly). The trees are still exposed to the atmosphere and can go up in CO2 at anytime. I’m sure taht a few people with matches wouldn’t have too much of a problem. How in the hell are you going to stop that happening for the next two thousand years?

          Basically living things are too transient to be of much use unless you first remove human interference out of the equation. I’d prefer not to be removed..

          It is a pointless drop in a bucket unless you first cut the supply of fossil carbon being shunted into the surface volatiles.

          If you want to be depressed, have a look at these two of my favourite links….

          https://www.skepticalscience.com/honey_mitigated_climate_change.html

          This one is pretty old now. Back in 2008, people still thought that it was possible to “store” CO2 in the oceans. I guess they didn’t think that one through..
          http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2008/06/carbon-capture.html

      • srylands 11.3.2

        “Don’t be silly. Pine trees with a life of what ? 40 years growing time before they’re cut down and start excreting that fossil CO2… Transient and irrelevant. ”

        That is incorrect. Your statement would only be correct if we burned our forests at maturity.

        If the wood is converted to finished wood products the carbon is locked up for decades, even centuries.

        Pine trees that are felled in New Zealand (or die naturally) generally do not decompose completely (resulting in humus, and compacted soils). So the carbon released is less than the carbon sequestered.

        The net carbon emissions for different end uses were all accounted for in determining net carbon credits for emission units under the emission trading schemes of the Kyoto Protocol.

        So in summary, New Zealand’s radiata pine forests make a very significant contribution to emissions mitigation. That is why since 1997 New Zealand Governments have led the way at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties in negotiating forest sink rules.

        • lprent 11.3.2.1

          It is a temporary patch for less than a hundred years.

          Try and find the volumes of wood that were chopped down from our forests in the 19tn century. Most of it (~80-90%+) has already made it into the atmosphere as it has already been burnt.

          Basically the whole idea of “living carbon sinks” exposed to the atmosphere is just figleaf for fools like yourself. No one with any science background who looks at the carbon lifecycle places any credence on it being particularly useful.

      • Bob 11.3.3

        Good to see you going on a rant without reading the article I linked too again lprent!
        My comment had nothing to do with cabon cycles, it was around the ‘smell’ of pine trees which lower temperatures locally, add this to Mickeysavages link above around reforestation and we have the beginnings of a solution to ‘Climate Change’ (on the downstream side, work needs to continue on further reducing reliance on fossil fuels). What I am saying is the ETS is a crock of shit and that money should be put into reforestation rather than being used to help 3rd world countries produce more CO2 and exacerbate the problem!

        • lprent 11.3.3.1

          I read it. It was clear that science was crap in terms of the total effect.

          It makes no particular difference because it is too far down in the air column to be particularly useful. You notice that they haven’t pointed out how high in the atmosphere these things form clouds and mist? There is a reason for that – it is really low. Therefore its effect is minimal at causing HEAT to be removed from the whole atmosphere when energy has been pouring in from the sun for 10s of kilometres striking molecules of water and air and being converted into heat.

          Basically the authors (or more likely the journo) appear to have confused a low humidity atmosphere as seen over the poles and deserts with a water laden one over a more temperate zone. And the effect of low level ground level clouds in reflecting light compared to weather system higher clouds. It is an effect, but a relatively small one world wide.

          You’ll also find that it has already been estimated into the existing climate models. They may not be able to understand how an effect is reached, but they can model the empirical results from looking at the energy return from satellites.

          Perhaps you should read about the depth of the atmosphere and how CO2 acts as a greenhouse gas. It’d make things clearer for you.

  12. tricledrown 12

    Pine trees.
    We need a much wider diversity in our timbet industry.
    As we have seen with Kauri dieback and the painted apple moth.
    Having all eggs in a small basket.
    Is dumb and dumber.
    National by focusing on commodity based industries is putting NZs income in a extremely volatile small basket.
    Lead by basket case bankster.

  13. Draco T Bastard 13

    The hellish monotony of 25 years of IPCC climate change warnings

    But in the words of that great British band The Smiths, you can now stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before.

    That’s because all of the above comes not from today’s blockbuster IPCC report on the impacts of climate change, but from the first one started in 1988 and published in 1990. Much of the science it drew on was older still.

    Just so we can calibrate our memories here, 1990 was the year Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web, Nelson Mandela got out of jail and MC Hammer wore those pantaloons (U Can’t Touch This).

    Now more than 25 years after scientists started compiling that first report, the latest report is similarly alarming – just with added impacts and greater certainty.

    And it’s because of the idiots like National and Act that we haven’t done anything. Hell, even Labour carry some of the blame because they sure as hell didn’t do enough.

  14. Murray Olsen 14

    I’m appalled that Jamie Whyte could have been a philosophy lecturer. I haven’t heard anything from him beyond the level of a Philosophy 101 student after a couple of beers and the first week of lectures, which mainly consist of handing out the reading lists, class timetables, and room schedules. It’s the poverty of philosophy writ large.

  15. Philj 15

    Xox
    But he does have a swanky Proper English accent! Slim pickin’s for a party with crazy and misguided bedfellows. And he has the ‘right’ surname. ..

    • felix 15.1

      ACT leadership and candidate selection processes operate on first names only.

      However on the internal documentation there is a space after the name where the board may write a short mnemonic relating to the applicant to help them memorise who the person is.

      Sometimes those mnemonics end up on the published material by mistake, usually when someone forgets the brackets. This happened in the cases of:

      Jamie (white)
      Don (brash)
      Rodney (hide!!)
      John (banks)

      True story. You can get Pete to check it if you don’t believe me.

  16. irascible 16

    Well Colin Craig, the well known resident of Planet Key, seems to believe that we don’t have global warming merely the sun shining hotter or colder depending on its mood.

    “Responding to a question from Howick resident Bruce Waller on climate change, Craig says CO 2 levels have risen but whether the sun has a hot day or a cold day “is by far the biggest influence” on the Earth’s climate.

    New Zealand is a small contributor to rising CO 2 levels so it should not play a part in fighting climate change, he says.

    “I think that some people use it as an excuse to start writing a whole lot ….”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/9892353/Jones-Craig-meet-the-people

    • You_Fool 16.1

      Like Jon Stewart said “Damn those thousand-aires conning us with their science to keep their cosy thousands of dollars a year jobs. We should listen to these nice billionaire oil tycoons who have no obvious benefit from not listening to the academics…”

  17. tc 17

    What luddites act are, savvy climate denialists have moved on from shouting down the bvious onto the next meme but good old act eh.

    says alot about the calibre of sock puppett on offer to the hollowmen, maybe stabbing rortney wasnt such a great idea after all.

  18. dv 18

    .I am not sure if this was satire.

    http://imperatorfish.com/2014/03/31/too-much-whyte-noise/

    The message from ACT is that if you’re a small player, you have no business trying to tackle large problems. Leave it to the big boys. They have the power to do something about it.

    It’s a compelling argument. The ACT Party is itself a tiny party, a small player in a parliament dominated by two parties. It holds less than 1% of the seats in Parliament, and regularly registers at or under 1% in the opinion polls.

    What business, then, does ACT have telling the public how the country should be run? Surely the message here is that if you’re small, you should shut up and let the big boys do the talking.

    So will ACT Party leader Jamie Whyte follow his own advice? I don’t want to hear another word from him before the election.

  19. Philj 19

    Xox
    ACT is the orphan/bastard child begat from Thatcher and … father unknown.

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    Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford is calling on the Government to declare a state of emergency over the nation’s homelessness crisis. “There are 42,000 people homeless and living in severe housing stress while the National Government behaves like a possum ...
    1 day ago
  • Labour calls for state of emergency on homelessness
    Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford is calling on the Government to declare a state of emergency over the nation’s homelessness crisis. “There are 42,000 people homeless and living in severe housing stress while the National Government behaves like a possum ...
    1 day ago
  • Government must review state sector retirement investment
    The State Sector Retirement Savings Scheme has no business investing in companies which manufacture cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines and nuclear weapons, Labour MP and Parliamentarians for Global Action executive member Su’a William Sio says. “I endorse the call made by the ...
    2 days ago
  • Councils shouldn’t rush into Easter Trading
    City and district councils must ensure they don’t rush into trading on Easter Sunday ahead of local body elections next month, Labour’s Pacific Islands Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio says. “This decision must be taken seriously and only after extensive ...
    2 days ago
  • Minister can’t wash hands of illegal KiwiSaver investments
    The Minister responsible for appointing default KiwiSaver providers should take responsibility for ensuring they act legally, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “The National Government has now had confirmed what they were told more than a week ago – that ...
    2 days ago
  • Fixing our broken economy
    Globally, the “neo-liberal” consensus is rapidly vanishing (I use quotation marks because there are some in Aotearoa who deny such a thing as neo-liberalism exists). Regardless of the debate around its meaning, neo-liberal is a useful descriptor for the general ...
    GreensBy Julie Anne Genter
    3 days ago
  • Fixing our broken economy
    Globally, the “neo-liberal” consensus is rapidly vanishing (I use quotation marks because there are some in Aotearoa who deny such a thing as neo-liberalism exists). Regardless of the debate around its meaning, neo-liberal is a useful descriptor for the general ...
    GreensBy Julie Anne Genter
    3 days ago
  • Government railroading Maori Land Bill through
    Maori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell seems determined to railroad his Te Ture Whenua Maori Bill through despite the large number of submitters in opposition to the bill, says MP Meka Whaitiri, whose Ikaroa-Rāwhiti electorate contains nearly 30 per cent ...
    3 days ago
  • A national day to commemorate NZ land wars
    It’s fantastic that the government has agreed to a hold a national day commemorating the New Zealand land wars. Announced at Kingi Tūheitia’s 10th koroneihana celebrations, alongside the return of Rangiriri Pā to the Kingitanga, the news marked a significant ...
    GreensBy Marama Davidson
    3 days ago
  • A national day to commemorate NZ land wars
    It’s fantastic that the government has agreed to a hold a national day commemorating the New Zealand land wars. Announced at Kingi Tūheitia’s 10th koroneihana celebrations, alongside the return of Rangiriri Pā to the Kingitanga, the news marked a significant ...
    GreensBy Marama Davidson
    3 days ago
  • Government turns a blind eye to struggling sole parents
    Social Development Minister Anne Tolley’s claims that her Government’s work with sole parents is her biggest success are in tatters after a major increase in homelessness amongst that group, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “Anne Tolley is seriously ...
    3 days ago
  • Time has come for state apology on abuse
    Labour is today calling on the Government to issue an apology for historic abuse in state institutions. Speaking after the launch of Elizabeth Stanley’s book “The Road to Hell; state violence against Children in Post-war New Zealand”, Labour’s Justice spokesperson ...
    3 days ago
  • It’s OK to have a few slaves, just not too many? Minimum wage loophole hasn’t gone away
    New Zealand still needs legislation to ensure adult New Zealanders are not exploited by being taken on as contractors for less than the equivalent of the minimum wage, says Labour list MP David Parker.  “My Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment ...
    3 days ago
  • Lessons from the Future of Work Commission: Building Wealth from the Ground Up
    Good morning, and thank you for attending today’s Future of Work Seminar here in Wellington. I want to particularly acknowledge Beth Houston who has spent many hours pulling together the programme for today’s event, and to Olivier and the staff ...
    3 days ago
  • Cooking 4 Change at the Auckland City Mission
    On Tuesday evening I participated in the launch of the ‘Cooking 4 Change’ recipe book, which Metiria and I both contributed our favourite recipes to. Along with Dick Frizzell, Trelise Cooper, Tiki Taane, Erin Simpson, Jono & Ben, Colin Mathura-Jeffree, a couple ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    4 days ago
  • Cooking 4 Change at the Auckland City Mission
    On Tuesday evening I participated in the launch of the ‘Cooking 4 Change’ recipe book, which Metiria and I both contributed our favourite recipes to. Along with Dick Frizzell, Trelise Cooper, Tiki Taane, Erin Simpson, Jono & Ben, Colin Mathura-Jeffree, a couple ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    4 days ago
  • Backbencher Matt’s Bill is a Doocey
    The latest National Member’s Bill pulled from the ballot is yet another waste of Parliament’s time and shows the Government’s contempt for the House and the public with much more important issues needing debate, says Labour’s Shadow Leader of the ...
    4 days ago
  • Gun laws creaking under the strain
     Questions have to be asked  after surprising revelations at the Law and Order Select Committee about the police and their ability to manage the gun problem in New Zealand, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “The lack of resources is ...
    4 days ago
  • Most homeless are working poor – Otago Uni
    The finding by Otago University researcher Dr Kate Amore that most homeless people are in work or study is one of the most shocking aspects of the housing crisis, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Social service agencies report many ...
    4 days ago
  • Māori seats entrenched by Tirikatene Bill
    National and the Māori Party need to support my member’s Bill which is designed to entrench the Māori electorate seats in Parliament, Labour’s Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene says. “Under the Electoral Act the provisions establishing the general electorates ...
    4 days ago
  • Trade dumping bill could hurt NZ industries
    The Commerce Select Committee is currently hearing submissions on the Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill. This bill worries me. I flagged some major concerns during its first reading.   I am now reading submissions from NZ Steel, ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    5 days ago
  • Just 8 per cent of work visas for skills shortages
    Just 16,000 – or 8 per cent – of the 209,000 work visas issued last year were for occupations for which there is an identified skills shortage, says Labour Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “The overwhelming majority of the record number ...
    5 days ago
  • Hard won agreement shouldn’t be thrown away
    The Government should ignore talk across the Tasman about doing away with the labelling of GM free products, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King. “Labelling of genetically modified products was a hard won agreement in 2001 by Australian and the ...
    5 days ago
  • National’s privatisation Trojan horse
     The National government is using the need to modernise the school system as a Trojan horse for privatisation and an end to free public education as we know it, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “There is no doubt that ...
    5 days ago
  • Shameless land-banking ads show need for crackdown
    The fact that more than 300 sections are shamelessly being advertised on Trade Me as land-banking opportunities during a housing crisis shows the need for a crackdown on property speculators, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Of the 328 ...
    5 days ago
  • Standard and Poor’s warning of housing crisis impact on banks
    The National Government’s failure to address the housing crisis is leading to dire warnings from ratings agency Standard and Poor’s about the impact on the strength of the economy and New Zealand banks, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Standard ...
    5 days ago
  • Ihumatao needs action not sympathy
    The Petition of Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) calling on Parliament to revoke Special Housing Area 62 in order to protect the Ihumatao Peninsula and Stonefields, has fallen on deaf ears, says the Labour MP for Mangere Su’a William Sio.  ...
    5 days ago
  • Another delay to justice system reform for victims of sexual violence
    I believe most, if not all, New Zealanders would expect our court system to uphold the dignity of complainants, hold perpetrators to account for crimes including sexual and domestic violence and uphold the crucial right to a fair trial. Yet ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    5 days ago
  • Another delay to justice system reform for victims of sexual violence
    I believe most, if not all, New Zealanders would expect our court system to uphold the dignity of complainants, hold perpetrators to account for crimes including sexual and domestic violence and uphold the crucial right to a fair trial. Yet ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    5 days ago
  • Student visa fraud & exploitation must stop
    The Government must act immediately to end fraud and exploitation of international students that threatens to damage New Zealand’s reputation, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. ...
    6 days ago
  • Government needs to show leadership in reviewing monetary policy
    The Reserve Bank’s struggles to meet its inflation target, the rising exchange rate and the continued housing crisis shows current monetary policy needs to be reviewed - with amendments to the policy targets agreement a bare minimum, says Labour’s Finance ...
    6 days ago
  • Local democracy under threat
    The National Government is in the process of gutting our local democracy through it’s Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). We’ve been hearing submissions from councils, and a few community members, all around the country who are deeply ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    6 days ago
  • Local democracy under threat
    The National Government is in the process of gutting our local democracy through it’s Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). We’ve been hearing submissions from councils, and a few community members, all around the country who are deeply ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    6 days ago
  • Slash and burn of special education support
    Slashing the support for school age children with special needs is no way to fund earlier intervention, Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “National’s latest plan to slash funding for children with special needs over the age of 7 in ...
    1 week ago
  • National’s Pasifika MPs must have free vote
      Pacific people will not take kindly to the Government whipping their Pacific MPs to vote in favour of a  Bill that will allow Sunday trading  at Easter, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “We are seeing ...
    1 week ago
  • Maritime Crimes Bill – balancing security and free speech
    Parliament is currently considering the Maritime Crimes Amendment Bill, which would bring New Zealand up to date with current international rules about maritime security. The debate around the Bill reflects two valid issues: legitimate counter-terrorism measures and the right to ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    1 week ago
  • Rio Olympics captioning – setting the record straight
    In the House on Thursday, my colleague, Labour Party spokesperson on Disability Issues, Poto Williams asked a great question. After which the Minister, Nicky Wagner, stood up and finally publicly acknowledged the National Foundation for the Deaf for funding the ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    1 week ago
  • Rio Olympics captioning – setting the record straight
    In the House on Thursday, my colleague, Labour Party spokesperson on Disability Issues, Poto Williams asked a great question. After which the Minister, Nicky Wagner, stood up and finally publicly acknowledged the National Foundation for the Deaf for funding the ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    1 week ago
  • Teachers’ low wages at the centre of shortages
      Figures that show teachers’ wages have grown the slowest of all occupations is at the heart of the current teacher shortage, says Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  In the latest Labour Cost Index, education professionals saw their wages grow ...
    1 week ago
  • Government’s Tax Law undermines common law principles
    A tax amendment being snuck in under the radar allows changes to tax issues to be driven through by the Government without Parliamentary scrutiny, says Labour’s Revenue spokesman Stuart Nash. “The amendment allows any part of the Tax Administration Act ...
    1 week ago
  • Government slippery about caption funding
      The Government has refused to apologise for taking the credit for funding Olympic Games captioning when the National Foundation for the Deaf  was responsible, says Labour’s spokesperson on Disability Issues Poto Williams.  “This shameful act of grandstanding by Ministers ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Default KiwiSaver investments should be reviewed
    The investments of the default KiwiSaver providers should be reviewed to make sure they are in line with New Zealanders’ values and expectations, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Most New Zealanders would be appalled that their KiwiSaver funds are ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New ministry should look after all children
    The Government has today shunned well founded pleas by experts not to call its new agency the Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Labour’s Spokesperson for Children Jacinda Ardern says.  “Well respected organisations and individuals such as Children's Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Triclosan – nasty chemical will be reassessed
    Last week my campaign for this chemical to be reassessed by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) took another step forward. After many months of waiting, the EPA have agreed that triclosan needs to be reassessed. Triclosan is an ingredient in many ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Triclosan – nasty chemical will be reassessed
    Last week my campaign for this chemical to be reassessed by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) took another step forward. After many months of waiting, the EPA have agreed that triclosan needs to be reassessed. Triclosan is an ingredient in many ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Ratification okay but we need action
    Today’s decision to ratify the Paris agreement on Climate Change by the end of the year is all well and good but where is the plan, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods.  “The Government’s failure to plan is planning ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Stats changes can’t hide unemployment reality
    Today’s minor drop in unemployment numbers is nothing to celebrate given the changes made to the official numbers that cut thousands of people looking for work out of the jobless rate, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Making any comparisons ...
    2 weeks ago

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