web analytics

English honeymoon over already

Written By: - Date published: 7:37 am, December 16th, 2016 - 198 comments
Categories: bill english, Gerry Brownlee - Tags: , ,

The English honeymoon came to an abrupt end yesterday as the new PM copped an earful in Kaikoura – PM Bill English: Frustrated Kaikoura locals say town is ‘the absolute pits’ (or see the almost identical version in The Herald)

Angry and isolated Kaikoura locals rounded on Prime Minister Bill English and his Earthquake Commission minister Gerry Brownlee during a flying visit on Thursday.

English, who is in Kaikoura on his first official visit as prime minister, landed in a Defence Force chopper on the lawn of Kekerengu cafe The Store, to be met with about 40 furious and frustrated locals.

Clarence farmer John Murray told English: “We had a meeting here three weeks ago and Gerry was here, and we left full of hope that something was going to happen … we have sat down there for three weeks and nothing has bloody well happened and it’s shocking, it is the absolute pits.”

Not much love there for English. And it won’t get any better, if the Christchurch experience is anything to go by – Christchurch rebuild gets worst rating from Treasury

As a footnote to this incident, naturally Gerry Brownlee lost his rag –

“Sorry you’re frustrated, but I’m p….. off that you took that attitude quite frankly, and I’ve just sworn on TV.”

The argument continued when the man said: “That’s fine Gerry, but I think you’ll find everyone here, thinks like I think.”

But Brownlee didn’t want to let the criticism go answered: “How do you think I feel? Sitting here looking at this and nothing happening, course we’re working hard to get it done.”

Lucky there were no stairs nearby. What a disgrace Brownlee is.

Key would have handled this better.

198 comments on “English honeymoon over already ”

  1. Paul 1

    As Bradbury says, ranting at earthquake survivors is an odd way to connect with voters.

  2. Eyre 2

    Ffs. It’s been 4 weeks. 32 days since the earthquake.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 2.1

      …yes, and Brownlee has wasted no time enhancing his reputation for stupid arrogant bullying.

      • Eyre 2.1.1

        Was the farmer not also an stupid arrogant bully. The south route is going to open next couple of weeks.

        • One Anonymous Bloke 2.1.1.1

          “The farmer did it too!”

          Is the farmer seeking votes? 😆

          • Eyre 2.1.1.1.1

            No the farmer is just an idoit

            • Carolyn_nth 2.1.1.1.1.1

              Does that mean like – e-currency?

            • One Anonymous Bloke 2.1.1.1.1.2

              Keep it up, you’re perfect National Party material.

            • lprent 2.1.1.1.1.3

              Is that short for “I Do It” too (but worse) – the variant of the National spinner “but Labour did..”

              It pays to spell correctly when calling someone else an “idoit”.

              You look like an idiot spinner.

              • Eyre

                Sorry I have dyslexia. But don’t feel bad. I haven’t let it hold me back in life

                • Carolyn_nth

                  Don’t mean to make fun of a dyslexic person – just interested in the meaning of words.

                  • Eyre

                    Two things I’ve learnt in live. Never asked a married couple when they are having children and never laugh if someone can’t spell.you never know their situation. Auto check sometimes let’s me down. Also Iprent should know better.

                    • Macro

                      Totally agree Eyre, I have a family member who also has major trouble with the spelling of even the most common used words. It doesn’t make her life easy, but then it doesn’t hold her back either. She is hugely involved in a raft of social issues and major organisations and is an extremely capable person.

                    • Eyre []

                      It’s very frustrating. But mostly embarrassing. But it makes you think differently. And I’m in the job I’m in because of it. My son had type 1 diabetes. So not being able to spell. Have to read a page 4 times. Don’t know left from right (don’t play golf with me. I have my partners going all over the place).it’s not too bad

                    • Muttonbird

                      Fuck me, and hasn’t it let you down in this post. That’s not dyslexia, that’s just lazy.

                      I think you are a multi of some banned right wing troll, fwiw.

                      [The policy states that it’s not ok to use language or attacks that exclude people. Too much of this discussion falls in the Abelism category. It’s not ok to deny that someone has a disability when they do, and doing so is a political act, esp when you have no way of knowing, that impacts negatively on people with disabilities. Please stop. – weka]

                    • Eyre []

                      Fuck off. I thought the left was a board church

                    • Why would a dyslexic person be offended by someone making fun of their spelling – can’t be the first time Eyre has experienced that. Furthermore, are dyslexic people to be exempted from being corrected for their bad spelling just because they are dyslexic? I’ll bet they don’t want special treatment. If you comment on a blog, you can hardly expect to have your special spelling go unnoticed. If you walk with a limp, you’d not get far (pun intended) if you stopped to berate every person who noticed your awkward walking style. I’ve a dyslexic friend who revels in the creativity of his own mis-spellings, and writes poetry leaving his creative mistake intact.

                    • Muttonbird

                      Look at that. Suddenly Eyre’s spelling improved as the day wore on.

                    • Eyre []

                      Spell check, Google and a well worn dictionary . Were you a teacher in the 70s. All you need is a ruler. I’ve learnt to spell using trial and error. Mostly error. Especially when spell check can’t even work out what writing

                    • “Board church” – how my dyslexic friend would have laughed and how transparent was that effort by “Eyre” to cement in his “I’m dyslexic, love me” profile.

                    • Muttonbird

                      Eyre. Just stop. You are not helping Bill’s new National with this carry on.

                    • So, I’m wondering why Eyre would come onto this blog and call someone, a farmer, an idiot when he knows himself, or at least claims to know, what it’s like to be called an idiot, him being dyslexic and all. It’s not only that behaviour struck me as odd, I was also puzzled by his using the word, “idiot”, the key word in his unpleasant attack on the farmer (who couldn’t defend himself and curry sympathy the way Eyre did here) without checking it first. Someone who knows he spells things wrongly would surely be extra careful when choosing the words he uses to denigrate another person on a public forum like this. It just doesn’t make sense. Muttonbird’s sensed Eyre’s insincerity, I believe, and has his measure.

                      [please see moderator note above, thanks – weka]

              • Carolyn_nth

                Doit (somewhat archaic) = “a small piece of money, a trifling sum, a trifle, a small part of anything”

                Idoit must be the internet version

            • keepcalmcarryon 2.1.1.1.1.4

              “No the farmer is just an idoit”
              Actually Eyre, you are the idiot here. By chance I know this area rather well. John Murray is a very well respected farmer and member of the community.
              Kekerengu is North of kaikoura, the road blockage he is referring to is between the clarence area and kaikoura. Untouched by road crews, local certified contractors standing idle.
              The south route you talk of is south of kaikoura, a place the murrays cant even get to. Learn some basic geography.
              Johns message was significant in a safe national seat that bleeds blue – dont use us for a photo op session with the new prime minister if you arent going to follow through what you have promised. Do not take the electorate for granted.
              There is immense frustration at what appears to be mishandling of roading priorities, especially in the rural area. Do not mistake this for ingratitude at the incredible generosity of kiwis to those affected.
              The media is only giving you sound bites.
              Notice the story title about the town being “the pits” is a total misquote?

              • simbit

                Similar pattern to Govt response to Chch 2011. People are running on adrenalin. The first days, even weeks, are almost fun, by which I mean an adventure, the most dramatic communal event most people will ever experience. Then it’s just shit.

          • Tricledrown 2.1.1.1.2

            Shifting the blame.
            Keys tactics.

        • Matiri 2.1.1.2

          This farmer is in Kekerengu which in north of Kaikoura. They are all stranded by slips, cant go north or south!

          • Eyre 2.1.1.2.1

            It could take up to two years to get the north end open.

            • dukeofurl 2.1.1.2.1.1

              The road from the north is passable to the Clarence river, which is south of this location – kekerengu valley.
              They just want a little work to allow reasonable access.

              You should check your maps before mouthing off with absurd comments

              • Muttonbird

                Not possible. Eyre is dyslexic in case anyone hadn’t been informed, and also has major issues with map reading and geography.

                Eyre’s only strength is defending Gerry Brownlee.

                • Could Eyre have also misspelled his own nom de plume?
                  Could he in fact be in … Eeyore?

                • Macro

                  I take strong exception to your constant slurring of dyslexic people. Please desist. It is not funny and is highly offensive.

                  • Muttonbird

                    Apologies to you Macro. I’m not going to say I did’t mean to cause offence because I did mean to cause offence – to one particular new troll.

                    That troll used dyslexia as some sort of ‘go easy on me’ strategy and that isn’t acceptable, imo.

                    • Macro

                      I don’t think people realise just how difficult it is for people with dyslexia to communicate in the written form, and to constantly make reference to it in an ad hominem manner because you disagree with their argument, decreases yours as well.
                      As it happens – when I heard that farmer rant on, on RNZ this morning I had to agree that his behaviour was stupid. Having worked in the civil construction industry, on site, I can say that what some inexperienced people see as an easy job, may not infact be the case.
                      Now we are told that it was in fact the road North that the farmer was referring to – even so – if that clearance meant the dumping of spoil into the marine environment, that would be regarded as an offence under the RMA. I know Brownlee has dictatorial powers in this situation; but he will be aware that such action must only be taken as a last step. Furthermore, what might be seen by some “experienced” gungho operators as as simple job can be a highly hazardous one – and I have seen many large machines operated by “experienced operators” get themselves, and their machinery into highly hazardous, and dangerous situations. Slips such as have occured in Kaikoura are not to be taken lightly, and while one can appreciate the frustration of locals, who percieve that things are progressing too slowly, they need to be aware that to go too quickly may well endanger the lives of workers.
                      So yes I thought his outburst “idiotic” too.

                    • Muttonbird

                      You are bending over backwards to defend the government’s response to this event too? I am surprised.

                  • Macro – of course I’ll stop but I don’t hold the same view as you about this issue. I have troubles myself with “directional dyslexia” and laugh along with anyone who finds my mistakes funny. I believe that granting some people amnesty from teasing is a mistake, especially when the “mistakes” are not serious. The best way to deal with issues like dyslexia, colour-blindness (I’m colour blind, btw) and other “afflictions” is to laugh along with the rest of the world. Don’t you think?

                    • Eyre

                      Yes it’s really funny. When a teacher calls you stupid in front of the class. Hiding in the toilets when parts for plays are being picked. But I do wish I have never have said it. But I hate it when people correct my spelling. It’s like finishing a stutters sentence. I’ve read this blog for years. And never have I seen such horrible things written by you two. If you are a reflection of the left. Then good luck to the kids. Next time I’ll throw in a few more spelling mistakes.

                    • Yes it’s really funny. When a teacher right-wing commenter calls you a farmer stupid an idoit (sic) in front of the class readers on a public blog

                      FIFY.

                      I believe you are suffering a worse condition; passive/agressiveness – your “poor me” ploy is unimpressive.
                      edit: didn’t see the moderators note til now, but believe I’m not denying “that someone has a disability when they do”

                    • Macro

                      You might like to ask Catherine Delahunty who (with Judith Collins and a few other MPs) has sat on a sub-committee this year investigating this very subject, what they were told by the many people who submitted and made verbal statements. On many occassions they were horrified with what they heard. Are you aware that between 30% – 50% of our prison population are dyslexic?. Yes some people have handled their affliction – but just as many have not.
                      Now I don’t have a great deal of time for Gerry Brownlee, or Bill English, or any National MP for that matter, but I think the behaviour of the man in Kaikoura was stupid. Yes he is frustrated, and so is every one else – but loosing your rag does not help the situation one iota.
                      Furthermore I have seen large diggers roll down hillsides when operaters went beyond the bounds of safety, thinking they knew better than the “experts”. The results are not pretty, and everything is then held up because of their stupid actions. I believe that this is the situation in Kaikora at the moment. People who want to “get on with it” when caution is needed.

            • Kevin 2.1.1.2.1.2

              Good news is that work on re-establishing the rail link should start around March next year. Only one tunnel to rebuild and then re-lay track. Will be much quicker than doing the road.

              • dukeofurl

                Yes. The rail track went through tunnels on the worst affected headlands. And tunnels are more resilient during earthquakes.

            • keepcalmcarryon 2.1.1.2.1.3

              “It could take up to two years to get the north end open”

              Bullshit. Is that you Gerry?

    • North 2.2

      And ???……..Eyre @ 2. Surly pensioner basher Brownlee !

    • Joy FL 2.3

      Yeah, give it 32 years then complain 🙁

    • Wellfedweta 2.4

      Exactly. What a loser John Murray is. Still, there were others there who put Murray in his place. Pity Natwatch wasn’t honest enough to post the full article.

  3. chris73 3

    Its an emotional time so tensions will be high but I suspect most people are like this:

    “But not all at the meeting felt so strongly. One woman interrupted Murray’s tirade to question his assertion that “nothing’s been done”.

    “She said later that many of locals understood the challenges the Government faced in rebuilding critical infrastructure.”

  4. Carolyn_nth 4

    Interesting that Brownlee’s response seemed to dominate that by English.

    I suspect if Key had been there, Key would’ve done most of the talking and Brownlee would’ve taken a back seat.

    Makes it seem that English is not the dominant force in the Nat Caucus.

    • lprent 4.1

      Brownlee could have his eye on the PM seat after English loses?

      • Pat 4.1.1

        nah…even he couldn’t be that delusional.

      • Tricledrown 4.1.2

        Bully Brownlee
        Boring Bill.
        50 shade of grey boring Bill English.
        Media trainors Crosby Text or will be working over Xmas break.
        Brownlee will be put it spin rehab.
        Maybe even demoted.
        It will be hard for 50 shade’s of grey Boring Bill to shine above all the shining Misfit’s.

      • Ffloyd 4.1.3

        Bigly Brownlee PM??? Nah,he’d never fit in the front seats with ‘I am woman’ PB. Think of the overlap.

        • WILD KATIPO 4.1.3.1

          Helen Reddy disowns Paula ‘ leopard skin ‘ Bennett at World Wildlife conference…

        • Really? There’s so many worse things to say about Brownlee than simply fat-shaming him.

          There’s his odious disposition, the fact that he’s been treating Canterbury as his own personal fiefdom, the fact that he yells and and assaults ordinary citizens, and of course, the stupid attempt to sneak through the back door to his plane when he was running late, as if being a Minister gave him the right to skip through airport security without even talking to anyone about it. Brownlee exemplifies the common criticism of the National Party that they think they’re born to rule.

          All that is far more relevant than his weight.

          In a similar vein, although I don’t have much nice to say about Ms. Bennett, she actually has a fair point that being a woman is a plus in terms of providing a balanced perspective to the leadership team, (not to mention being good for your career prospects in the National Party, Parmar seems to be the only woman who’s not going anywhere) and Bennett has done so many terrible things during her career in parliament that although she could’ve expressed this a bit more clearly rather than simply straightforwardly saying “I’m a woman,” it wasn’t a completely dumb point to be making.

      • Infused 4.1.4

        2020? maybe.

        • Muttonbird 4.1.4.1

          2017. Bill won’t last the summer. It’s already apparent he doesn’t have the ground game and the quick thinking to head a socially corrupt National party for long.

      • mac1 4.1.5

        I don’t think that Brownlee is after the Kaikoura seat, that’s for sure!

    • Wellfedweta 4.2

      …or, English is comfortable letting others speak up.

      • WILD KATIPO 4.2.1

        He always was….comfortable hiding behind someone else…

        • Wellfedweta 4.2.1.1

          Are you suggesting being comfortable allowing a well informed colleague to speak up is hiding? Mmmm…does rather sound a bit like the Clark years.

          • WILD KATIPO 4.2.1.1.1

            I think what most here are suggesting is that the man lacks ‘ presence’.

            A poor example from a leader who try’s to emulate his predecessor in leading from the front. He has niether the snake oil charm of Key nor the bully boy persona of Brownlee.

            However , like all bullys , Brownlee is more bluster than substance. As evidenced by his well known incompetence over the CH CH earthquake.

            • Wellfedweta 4.2.1.1.1.1

              I can understand why you might think that, because the full article was not posted. Read the final paragraph’s and you’ll understand that English did speak up, and in a statesmanlike manner.

  5. Hanswurst 5

    Key would have handled this better.

    Perhaps, but would Brownlee? Of course, in reality it could be Brownlee venting at the knowledge that he will wake up on Monday as the newly appointed minister of mothballs, tumbleweed and the eerie whistling of the wind on certain back-country roads.

    • Pat 5.1

      it is simply Brownlee being Brownlee….his arrogant dismissive manner could perhaps be overlooked, or at least considered of less import if he wasn’t so goddamn useless at his job.

    • Stephen Doyle 5.2

      He wouldn’t have dared if Key had been there. Shows he doesn’t think much of Bill.

  6. Gosman 6

    What reason would the government have not to try and sort out the problems with transportation as quickly as they can? This seems to be simply a case of some locals expecting miracles and I understand the frustrations expressed by Brownlee.

    • Hanswurst 6.1

      Do you also think that his ranting covers him in glory?

      • Wellfedweta 6.1.1

        Yes. It’s refreshing to hear a politician call a spade a spade.

        • WILD KATIPO 6.1.1.1

          Was it refreshing for Jerry ‘ out through the security door ‘ Brownlee to barge his way through an airport security door showing his contempt for due process and regulations designed for the protection of others?

          And then go on to become Minister for Defense?

          That looks more like incompetence and being filled with a sense of his own self importance than ‘ refreshing’.

          • Wellfedweta 6.1.1.1.1

            What on earth has any of that got to do with this? That’s right, nothing.

            • WILD KATIPO 6.1.1.1.1.1

              And I presume if you were an employer conducting a job interview you would be the first to dismiss any negative and glaring signs of former incompetence and bad attitudes on the prospective new employee as well…

              That’s the problem with far right wing sycophants, … always too happy to rush to the defence of the incompetent and turn a blind eye to those with poor character traits…

              • wellfedweta

                I’m not employing Brownlee, I’m commenting on his response to an entirely stupid complaint.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 6.2

      So can I – he’s an arrogant graceless bully.

      Key flushed more than himself down the toilet by the looks.

      • Red 6.2.1

        Yep and take ones to no one I am sure OAb in similar circumstances you would have been quite as a church mouse (not, and rightly so ) unless your on line macho image is that, image only

        • Sam C 6.2.1.1

          It is definitely image only. OAB has no substance whatsoever. He’s your classic keyboard warrior – all anger and bitterness.

          • One Anonymous Bloke 6.2.1.1.1

            😆

            Keep telling yourself that boys.

          • Wellfedweta 6.2.1.1.2

            I actually worry about him. I ignore him now, but I do watch his caustic ranting with increasing concern for his stability.

            • WILD KATIPO 6.2.1.1.2.1

              @ Wellfedinsect

              The only thing that worry’s you about OAB is that he frequently calls you out and makes you look ridiculous.

              And btw… everyone’s also noticed your tendency towards passive aggression in your posts.

              • Wellfedweta

                I worry for OneAB because I showed him up twice in 2 days, and I immediately noticed a feral response. I’m not here to contribute to people’s imbalances.

                • But you are here to massage your own ego as well as the facts .

                  With more often than not indefensible arguments that run contrary to those facts and that are obvious for all to see.

                  • Wellfedweta

                    Point out one case where I have posted something false. You’ll need to back up you’re claims, as I am expected to.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      Example No.1:

                      I actually worry about him. I ignore him now, but I do watch his caustic ranting with increasing concern for his stability.

                      Not just falsehood: malice too.

                      Have a nice day.

                  • wellfedweta

                    Example?

          • WILD KATIPO 6.2.1.1.3

            @Sam C

            What was that Red just typed about ‘ takes one to know one’ ?

    • Molly 6.3

      …”and I understand the frustrations expressed by Brownlee.”

      And you would then expect Brownlee to understand the frustrations expressed by locals. But you don’t. Why not?

      • Gosman 6.3.1

        I understand they are wanting to get back to normal life as fast as possible and that this won’t likely be as fast as the government and others is able to go.

        • One Anonymous Bloke 6.3.1.1

          That’s probably true – they had to watch Dear Leader disappear around the U-bend for one thing.

    • saveNZ 6.4

      @Gosman – we live in a country with massive fault lines. Japan can get their roads repaired in a day. The government has had years since CHCH to take these issues seriously and do something about them. But they are more interested in feathering their own crony nests, rather than public service. As seen by Key pushing through zombie TPPA legislation one day after the earthquake. That was his priority for National government.

    • lprent 6.5

      As far as I can tell from this side of the globe, what we have is Brownlee saying that we have grandiose plans to completely re-engineer the routes over the next 5 years to deal with an earthquake in another 30 years.

      And we have some hard headed locals saying that they should just get the fucking existing routes patched – then Brownlee can start hisending jerkoff grandiose plans.

      As it happens, I agree with the farmer.

      • Gosman 6.5.1

        Except they are talking about repairing the existing routes in 1 year so I don’t know where you get your information from that Brownlee is talking about 5 from.

        • adam 6.5.1.1

          Desperate spin from Gossy again.

          Dude do you ever atual look at anything apart from your usual ideological position? Can you for one minute actually have some empathy for people, rather than play politics with their lives?

      • Eyre 6.5.2

        Is hisending a word

      • Once was and others etc 6.5.3

        It’s quite interesting to look back over NZ’s history at major rail and road projects and compare the time taken (with primitive tools) to complete.
        Apparently the amount of crap that needs to be cleared is equivalent to 300 olympic swimming pools.
        Admitedly that’s a shit load but it doesn’t actually seem beyond the capability of today’s mechanical equipment for it to have been removed by now if enough resources were thrown at it.
        Despite all those false images of guys leaning on shovels doing fuck all we used to here about during the start of the neo-liberal revolution, I’m thinking had the old Ministry of Works still been around, progress would be a fucking sight better than what we see today
        (Pardon the French)

    • Muttonbird 6.6

      What reason would the government have not to try and sort out the problems with transportation as quickly as they can?

      Cost.

      • ropata 6.6.1

        +! yep, nothing is more important to Bling than his precious surplus

        • Gosman 6.6.1.1

          Many of you lot have been bleating on at them for the past 8 years for running up debt but now you’re call with them being fiscally conservative. Go figure.

          • WILD KATIPO 6.6.1.1.1

            No,.. what people have been ‘ bleating about’ has been the gross displays of incompetence and anti democratic tactics used by Brownlee and co as displayed by the Christchurch earthquake fiasco.

            Once bitten , twice shy.

          • ropata 6.6.1.1.2

            Did you forget all the Nats party promises to balance the budget and give everyone tax cuts? And FJK prancing around on TV chanting “show me the money”? And all their stupid nit picking of Labour policy costings, all the while they are flushing away billions on roads of no significance, or building sheep farms in the desert. The Nats favourite lie is being fiscal conservatives — yeah right, only for marketing purposes.

            When it comes to public services, there’s no money. But somehow there are a lot of handouts for big business and strange pet projects like charter schools and social bonds.

    • Tricledrown 6.7

      Brownlee is a recidivist promise the earth and not deliver.
      A Close friend in the National Party said when Bill English lost the 2002 election They looked at Brownlee but said they he was to much of a Bully even to his own fellow MP’s

    • aerobubble 6.8

      Its not that we have the pop of Japan, or its economy, its how there were no farm tracks to turn into bypasses. Sure a couple of hundrend years may mean we dont yet have those back ways. Hopefully farmers realize they take a hit when their region gets clobbered and having walkers tracking across their land like ants may just expose the routes that would add resilience to their businesses and community.

    • @ Gosman

      This also shows you are not a farmer, operate a fishing or tourist business or any other type of person that earns their living by being hands on.

      What you really are is an IT white collar type individual that earns their living by sitting on their arse in an air conditioned office environment typing politically motivated sycophantic and condescending ill informed bullshit that is totally irrelevant to the issues faced by people in the real world.

      And how do I know you are an IT white collar type person?

      Because you admitted it once before in another post.

    • michelle 6.10

      Of course you would support bully boy brownlee Gosman do you understand the frustration of the people who were effected bully boy Brownlee needs to shut his big fat foul mouth and do his bloody job he gets paid for, if he wants the power and the responsibility that comes with the job. If he cant handle the heat get the f out of the kitchen bully boy brownlee.

  7. Ad 7

    Kaikoura is in for a smaller version of the Christchurch rebuild.

    While that sounds a little obvious, reinstating massive infrastructure doesn’t take months.

    It takes years.

    I have no problem with the people of Kaikoura losing it with politicians.
    But that SH1 and line line job will take at least five years to complete.
    The seismic strengthening design work alone could take 18 months.
    Then there’s the consenting. Then there’s construction itself.

    That little Kaikoura harbour upgrade is no simple job either.

    There is a wide, wide gap between filling people’s basic needs for food and shelter, and getting the longer range facilities up and running.

    By the time all the infrastructure rebuilds are done, society will have moved; tourist operators will figure out how to launch whalewatching from other more temporary sites. Bus tour operators will perhaps operate from Blenheim more. Perhaps the entire tourism industry from Picton to Christchurch will shift more to wine.

    Kaikoura – like Christchurch – is never going to have the same society again.

    • saveNZ 7.1

      See comment above AD about Japan. The National government has had years to be organised for disasters, but fails every time, badly. Finland as well, has months of snow and ice but gets all their roads done in a few months.

      It’s not just earthquakes either, every where you go in Auckland there is congestion from roadworks – often unnecessary – while necessary road upgrades go un fixed. A 3 day job takes 2 weeks or more. A friend up North was saying roadworkers have been working 2 years on a piece of road near him, it’s not that big a job, but there is a basic lack of competence, organisation, will power to get something fixed in a timely manner and so forth.

      NZ has become obsessed with process, having as many middle people as possible to clip the ticket and outsource everything to multiple parties with the end result, poorly trained workers on minimum wages while millions are being siphoned off. This is the result. Nothing gets done quickly or efficiently.

      P.S – no surprise to me that the Auckland AT/Council workers were found guilty of corruption in the high court recently. And my guess, is that that is the tip of the ice burg.

      • Ad 7.1.1

        We’re not the same culture as Japan and we never will.

        We don’t have comparable money in either the public or private sectors.
        We don’t have works departments now in either Council or government.
        We have a really different safety culture.
        We have a really stretched infrastructure and construction sector.
        We have only average skills levels.
        It’s not useful to compare us to Japan.

        The government is incredibly disaggregated for facing crises of this magnitude – I’d certainly agree with you there.
        I seriously would like to see far stronger coordination by DPMC of civil defence, NZTA, Kiwirail, Housing NZ, Armed Forces, Electricity Commission and Transpower, WorkSafe, local Councils, etc.

        The Opposition could do worse than propose how all of this will be planned in future to ensure that we are better prepared for the next one.

        • saveNZ 7.1.1.1

          @ ADI think you may have answered part of the question with your co ordination of civil defence, NZTA, Kiwirail, Housing NZ, Armed Forces, Electricity Commission and Transpower, WorkSafe, local Councils, etc….

          Too many organisations talking about co ordination, not enough co ordination and doing.

          For a start the defence force should be trained to be a big part of the civil defence. Don’t worry about private contractors in a disaster. Send a well trained army, navy, airforce with technical skills in there. Have them with purpose diggers and machinery flown in to save people within hours of disaster. Have sniffer dogs and so forth flown out. Have a proper community response like each neighbour checks each neighbour. etc etc. Then have the next defence teams rebuilding the roads, power, telecoms. etc etc.

          In the old days, you actually learnt a skill in the defence force like engineering or telecoms. Not sure if that is still the case. I think the biggest risk to NZ safety now is actually on the civil defence side, so we need to utilise the defence force for that dual role. They have the man power and their used to be real skills there.

          Gone are the days when defence should be spending billions on frigates that don’t even work in high seas just to do training exercises off the coast of Scotland. Even in a defence situation what use are those gigantic frigates – just get an army of drones onto them and they are toast anyway. They can’t even catch pirate fishermen according to Murray McCully. That is how useless our defence has become. The aircraft never work either due to lack of maintenance.

          Again it is 20th century thinking and it’s way out of date. Fighting is different now, technology is different now, and one of the biggest threats may just be getting water, food and power and recovery in disasters.

          As for private electricity and telecoms infrastructure – they are now completely reliant on poorly trained most migrant workers and the poor level state of that sector (just try to get a new land line and you will see what happens) or ring telecom and hear that it is a 1 hour wait (is that a joke, seriously in a telecoms company!). All staffed by mountains of middle and upper managers ‘co ordinating’ it all.

          I really think it is a lack of creativity and fiefdoms in the organisations that are the issue. The governments needs to seriously look at what the future holds – (the answer is in the past 5 years of what has been the biggest threats to life in NZ).

          Sadly I think this is too much common sense for National, but maybe under Labour coalition they can actually use it to make our country safer as well as create jobs and up skill people. Maybe we can actually go back to our no 8 wire mentality and actually defence is used for helping and saving Kiwis and other allies not killing people in wars we should not be part of.

        • Draco T Bastard 7.1.1.2

          We don’t have comparable money in either the public or private sectors.

          What’s money got to do with it?

          We don’t have works departments now in either Council or government.

          Which is really silly because it’s the government that does most of the construction work in the country.

          We have a really stretched infrastructure and construction sector.

          That seems to be the result of the profit drive.

          We have only average skills levels.

          What the hell does that even mean? Average of what? And if we don’t have the necessary skills then we need to be training those skills up.

          Although< i think you'll find that it's not lack of skills that's the problem but lack of people. In our efforts to do things cheaply we don't hire enough people to do the job, we don't train them well enough and we pay them SFA meaning that they're looking to leave ASAP.

          The government is incredibly disaggregated for facing crises of this magnitude – I’d certainly agree with you there.

          And the reason why is because we’ve gone the route of privatisation. It’s impossible to coordinate when the government is working through a bunch of companies that are competing with each other and are unwilling to share anything.

          • Ad 7.1.1.2.1

            We don’t have a lot of money to spare to rebuild things particularly in infrastructure. Rail of course isn’t funded independently as motorways are. Even in the public sector, having enough money is a real issue. We are a pretty small state to have to deal with the number of natural crises that hit – and incredibly lucky that we are in a sweet spot for tax revenue.

            The infrastructure companies are stretched because there’s an incredible amount of work to be done for the next several years. If you would like to see the margins at which they operate, the winning bids for public work are always published via Tenderlink.

            We certainly need to be training more people to build and rebuild infrastructure. There’s still lots of skills we have very few of – tunnelling for example.Most A and B Grade tunnellers get poached to work in Dubai or Hong Kong for far better money than public clients are prepared to fund here. The infrastructure industry really is stretched for capacity, and it’s not that easy to get staff and their families to move here.

            Privatisation was not something I ever supported, but it’s from an era over 30 years ago, and there’s no reversing it within the current parliamentary parties or any foreseeable government. Coherence is both the least and the most to expect now.

            • Draco T Bastard 7.1.1.2.1.1

              We are a pretty small state to have to deal with the number of natural crises that hit

              True but that’s got nothing to do with money.

              The infrastructure companies are stretched because there’s an incredible amount of work to be done for the next several years.

              Yep. There is. To get it done requires redirecting people and resources from what they’re doing now to getting them to do what needs to be done. A large number could come from the unemployed of course but some less valued industries would probably also take a cut.

              The infrastructure industry really is stretched for capacity, and it’s not that easy to get staff and their families to move here.

              But our economy isn’t.

              And that doesn’t even take into account the massive productivity increase that’s available through automation.

              We could do a hell of a lot more with the proper development.

              Privatisation was not something I ever supported, but it’s from an era over 30 years ago, and there’s no reversing it within the current parliamentary parties or any foreseeable government. Coherence is both the least and the most to expect now.

              Well, we certainly won’t see any change with that sort of attitude. Surely it’s better to demand that our systems do change?

              There’s still lots of skills we have very few of – tunnelling for example.Most A and B Grade tunnellers get poached to work in Dubai or Hong Kong for far better money than public clients are prepared to fund here.

              Didn’t have any issues when we got that big machine in to dig the tunnel for Auckland’s newest motorway. Probably because it’s all done by the machine.

            • saveNZ 7.1.1.2.1.2

              @Ad again you are answering your own issues … we have low wages and conditions and therefore we can’t attract highly paid skilled workers. Maybe time to rethink this, by either training our own people and increasing wages and conditions to make sure the workers stay. After Pike River, who wants to work underground anymore?

              ” – “There’s still lots of skills we have very few of – tunnelling for example.Most A and B Grade tunnellers get poached to work in Dubai or Hong Kong for far better money than public clients are prepared to fund here.””

      • Draco T Bastard 7.1.2

        A friend up North was saying roadworkers have been working 2 years on a piece of road near him, it’s not that big a job, but there is a basic lack of competence, organisation, will power to get something fixed in a timely manner and so forth.

        Part of the problem of dumping the MoW and council construction departments is that you end up with private companies that are really only there to rort the government and get the biggest profit they can out of it.

        NZ has become obsessed with process, having as many middle people as possible to clip the ticket and outsource everything to multiple parties with the end result, poorly trained workers on minimum wages while millions are being siphoned off. This is the result. Nothing gets done quickly or efficiently.

        QFT

        This is the exact opposite of what we were promised from privatisation.

        • Once was and others etc 7.1.2.1

          QFT (see my comment above)

          Seems all those promises of ‘efficiency and effectiveness’ haven’t actually come to pass.

          It kind of reminds me of Douglas’ rant about the old NZPO when we used to have to wait 8 weeks for a phone line. (Not that I ever had that problem for a start)

          Don’t know about you…..but have you tried to get fibre connected?
          3 weeks of bullshit excuses (such as we have to get permission to climb the pole)
          a few more weeks to find someone to do the work, then actually have it done,
          then a few more to have someone come and clean up the complete fuckup made in the first attempt.

    • lprent 7.2

      The key is to start patching now. Do the re-engineering later.

      Sure we could get large event in the next 5 years. But it is more likely that it will be 50

      • Ad 7.2.1

        Agree they have to start patching now.

      • mac1 7.2.2

        The patching has begun on the alternate route to ChCh from Blenheim. Travelled that road twice this week. Passed 165 trucks on the road- helped pass the time over the Lewis Pass. Also saw ten police cars.

        Some dozen road works encountered-patch jobs being done, installation of a bailey bridge, widening and repairs.

        A journey of 320 kms has become one of 460 kms- a four hour journey now over six hours.

        This will be the norm for twelve months, winter included, before SH1 is restored.

        40% longer journey, 50% more fuel, 15% charge for trucking costs extra.

        The truckies were courteous, and speeds very well disciplined especially through the repair sections where damage can so easily occur. Passed two truck accident scenes, though, which threatened a further detour of another 120 kms.

        Restoring SH1 is a big deal, along with the railway.

    • Tricledrown 7.3

      So Ad you are partially right but Japan fixed up their earthquake damages being far worse.
      In a quarter of the time.
      Brownlee make these sound bite promises then fails to deliver.
      Brownlee deserves what he gets.

    • keepcalmcarryon 7.4

      Kaikoura is not christchurch.

      I should put that in capitals.
      This has so far been one of the biggest most glaring false suppositions from the start. Civil defence controllers winging in from the big smoke to help a miniature christchurch, as they saw it.
      Initial emergency response was only in town for days, even a few hundred meters off the main road noone was checking let alone further out. With no communication, supplies, medical care water were all distributed to townspeople in the crucial first few days. In case you arent aware, kaikoura has a significant part of its population living rurally (half?) who just didnt know supplies were there, or if they did, they couldnt get in.
      Unlike christchurch there was instant isolation for the town and a decison to concentrate resources on the Inland road – a windy narrow access way requiring the consent (apparantly) of no less than 6 ticket clippers to open for registered one way convoy traffic on any given day. Any sprinkle of rain and at least one of these people is likely to close traffic. This is after a month, the road isnt actually too bad, its always had loose rock at the whales back but less bureaucrats.

      With just 2 weeks of work and far less resources the road south from kaikoura is almost open. Why didnt that get priority? Let alone bringing in outside work crews some having to billet in kaikoura when local certified contractors arent allowed to even start work?
      Dumb decions were also made not allowing farmers to move around on their own roads “for their own safety”.

      The kaikoura community is very tight, you would not understand that if you come from a big city Ad.
      It WILL be the same community after things are fixed even if the town looks different.
      And its not all bad either, there is a chance to improve on some of the old infrastructure, – bigger runway? Deeper harbour to get cruise boats closer in? its just about keeping small businesses (including local contractors) afloat until its done.

  8. Richard Christie 8

    “How do you think I feel? Sitting here looking at this and nothing happening,

    i.e. Gerry agrees that nothing has happened.

    What’s there to get in a tizzy about then?

    He’s seriously confused.

  9. saveNZ 9

    Sinkhole repaired in days.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2016/11/15/asia/fukuoka-sinkhole-filled/index.html

    How the Dutch build a tunnel under a highway in one weekend

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEa9jrkQm0c

    • Draco T Bastard 9.1

      And how much preparation went in to being able to do just that piece in the weekend?

      • Rosemary McDonald 9.1.1

        There are companies here in Godzone who can do that work….mostly farming and rural applications but there would be no problems scaling up.

        http://www.bridgeitnz.co.nz/our-bridges/c/26?gclid=CKS92OeN99ACFQubvQod_wcKYA

        http://www.selectbridges.co.nz/?gclid=CJ7njYSO99ACFZRvvAoduJsHSA

        I’m sure I heard yesterday the Kaikoura locals were asking why local contractors were not doing this work….surely in an emergency those companies with existing contracts with NZTA would not get all precious about protecting their patch?

        Second thoughts…they would.

        I have spent a lot of the time around the highways and the byways of New Zealand. It never ceases to impress me the sheer ingenuity of those who have constructed roads through some most uncooperative and unforgiving terrain. Not only the designers and engineers, but the workers teetering on cliff edges in their diggers, carefully scraping off another bucket of dirt so we can ‘get through’.

        We do this road building stuff really, really well in New Zealand…considering we have an unusually unstable geology.

        • Kevin 9.1.1.1

          “I’m sure I heard yesterday the Kaikoura locals were asking why local contractors were not doing this work….surely in an emergency those companies with existing contracts with NZTA would not get all precious about protecting their patch?”

          Depends on how much you donate to the National Party. Ask yourself why you can count the number of major roading companies on less than the fingers of one hand…

        • Draco T Bastard 9.1.1.2

          We do this road building stuff really, really well in New Zealand…considering we have an unusually unstable geology.

          Yep, I’m pretty sure that we do.

          I was more commenting about the video and the claim that it was all done in a weekend when it’s obvious from the video that there was a hell of a lot of preparation that went into making it so that that final part could be done in the weekend. I’m pretty sure that our construction people would do the same thing here.

          • Rosemary McDonald 9.1.1.2.1

            I understand that when they say “all done in a weekend” they mean “traffic will only be disrupted” for the weekend.

            It quite unreasonable for the public to expect to continue using a section of road when major repairs or engineering is being done. Yet we almost always expect our journeys to continue along the same route regardless of the work being done to maintain that route.

          • saveNZ 9.1.1.2.2

            “We do this road building stuff really, really well in New Zealand…considering we have an unusually unstable geology”.

            Are you crazy? Our roads are a joke in the western world! I think we have the worst run of accidents in the OECD and I’ve seen similar roads in the third world in Africa and Asia to some in Auckland.

            Seriously, you must have a different set of roading contractors where you live if you think we do good road building in NZ.

            And as for unstable geology – we have a temperate climate, other countries have snow, ice, tornados, hurricanes, deserts etc

            I don’t think geology should be an excuse for bad and slow workmanship.

            • Draco T Bastard 9.1.1.2.2.1

              We’re not the best and so there is room for improvement but we don’t appear to be as bad as you think.

              IMO, Most of our infrastructure failure comes from trying to do it as cheaply as possible rather than as good as possible. The result is often that it costs more.

              • saveNZ

                Yep our build em cheap and slow as possible seems to be a theme in this country.

                Not saying we are not able to do better, just that at present the status quo on roading building management is poor and the road building is slow and not built to last long in many cases.

                Not sure how rail maintenance compares. Maybe less cost there in the long run!

  10. Ch-ch Chiquita 10

    Well, no one expected Brownlee to tell the truth, now did they? No one wants to hear that the rebuild will take years, that businesses will bankrupt, that you will need to fight with EQC, then with insurance all while trying to figure out how to survive and when you express your frustration some people tell you, you can go and live somewhere else.
    I feel for the people of Kaikoura that are having to face the same problems Christchurch is still facing.

  11. Muttonbird 11

    Brownlee blaming people for being angry.

    Oh, the ironing.

  12. Cinny 12

    Talk back is alive with anti Brownlee phone calls, they are not happy those locals, they are angry with him, and fair enough too.

    • alwyn 12.1

      I suggest you listen to the item at the link just below.
      Are you really sure that it is the locals who are unhappy or is just a few left leaning residents of some of our cities who have no idea of what farmers are really like?

      • WILD KATIPO 12.1.1

        Im not sure if your not just being entirely sycophantic again , alwyn.

        The evidence is that not all farmers lick Nationals shoes either… otherwise the longstanding National party seat of Northland wouldn’t have been a landslide victory for Winston Peters.

        I wouldn’t get too gleeful in thinking farmers are just a bunch of unthinking morons who hang off every word that dribbles from the office of National party HQ, if I were you…

        • alwyn 12.1.1.1

          Well I am quite sure they aren’t silly enough to listen to any of the words that dribble from you.
          I am glad that you now realise how silly you are and I hope you can remember your statement. Try to keep to your claim the “I wouldn’t get to gleeful” in future. It hasn’t worked very well for you in the past to treat the majority of the New Zealand population as being silly has it?
          23% and led by Mr 8%.

          • Muttonbird 12.1.1.1.1

            You know the Nats and their wide-eyed followers are in trouble when reference to the polls come out.

            It’s been happening a lot lately.

          • swordfish 12.1.1.1.2

            “and (Labour) led by Mr 8%”

            Last time English led the National Party (late 2003), he scored a resounding 5% as Preferred PM.

  13. alwyn 13

    I suggest that all the urban socialists and Wadestown wadicals contributing to this rant about Brownlee should listen to the item from Morning Report today where they talked to a farmer in the area who was there at the meeting.
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=201827905

    Try listening to the section that starts at about 2m 50s and goes for the next minute or so.
    The farmer describes Brownlee’s response as “I thought he was brilliant” and a little bit further on as “I thought Gerry handled it beautifully”.

    The farmer, who was a cousin of the person you think Gerry was being rude to, certainly doesn’t think the people there were being treated dismissively does he?

    Perhaps those of you who live sheltered lives in the coffee houses of the Auckland CDB should see how an MP like Gerry can get on with people from another kind of life. If the Labour and Green MPs could learn from this they might end up with a bit more of the vote in elections.

    • Cinny 13.1

      Alwyn the people ringing up are Kaikoura locals on Radio Live and not “a few left leaning residents of some of our cities who have no idea of what farmers are really like” … side note have you been a farmer too?

      I don’t usually listen to RNZ, but I will to hear the opinion of ONE farmer.

      Alwyn the link does not work for me, i get the RNZ media player, but the media shows it is 0.00 long “No item playing” can you supply another link please that works. Thankies

      • alwyn 13.1.1

        Try playing it from here.
        http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/201827905/kaikoura-farmers-demand-progress-on-sh-1

        “have you been a farmer too”.
        I was never a farmer but my parents came from farming families and I had relatives (Uncles and cousins) who were. I also spent my school holidays, a long time ago, working on a sheep farm when I was at secondary school and I knew quite a lot of other people who were farmers. They were then, and probably still are now, a great deal blunter in their speech than townies ever were. I can’t imagine any of them being upset by what Gerry said.

        • Cinny 13.1.1.1

          I’ve done farming, so have my children, this girl comes from a family of farmers and educators. You think farmers are blunt, try spending some time in the fishing industry lololz.

          Thanks for the link that one works, still it’s only the opinion of one farmer and one wonders whom he voted for last election.

          Excuse my skepticism but it’s warranted with all the crap media has been putting out and the outgoing government too.

          Sooo you can use the opinion of one farmer to form your opinion, but me I’ll use the opinion of more than one local in Kaikoura. Might go for a drive next week find out for myself.

          • alwyn 13.1.1.1.1

            I will take you word for the fishing industry.
            I think it is a shame that most young people today don’t have any connection with the farming industry. Even something as simple as getting to feed an orphaned lamb is not part of their experience.

            Consider though, if you will, something before talking to people who weren’t present at the English/Brownlee meeting with the locals. The person who was interviewed this morning was actually present at the meeting with English and Brownlee. He didn’t just get a 10 second clip on TV or read something in the paper.
            He was also related to, and seemingly liked, the original local speaker.
            He still, from a position of knowing and seeing everything that went on, described Gerry as “brilliant” and “handled it beautifully”.
            He wasn’t being fed a line by the msm, was he? He was there.

            • Cinny 13.1.1.1.1.1

              THE PERSON, mhmmm one person, best we all take their word for it, no need to ask anyone else.

              LMFAO, how naive do you think the NZ public is Alwyn? You fellas got fluoride in the water up there or something?

              • alwyn

                “no need to ask anyone else. ”
                Of course you should talk to other people. I ask only that you consider the views of somebody who was at the meeting rather than ignore them and take the opinion of the hard-left employees of Radio New Zealand and TVNZ and their carefully arranged 10 second clips.

        • dukeofurl 13.1.1.2

          So Brownlee rang up the local MP to tell him get some one from the party in front of the microphone tout suite to counter the ‘real grumpy farmer’

          • alwyn 13.1.1.2.1

            You certainly have a vivid, if somewhat paranoid, imagination don’t you?
            The guy I listened to wasn’t a bit happy but he still seemed to think Brownlee had handled it pretty well.

          • Muttonbird 13.1.1.2.2

            That’s how the Nat machine operates for sure. Someone from the party runs interference. Pity the media are not up to stating that that is the case.

    • Red 13.2

      Green with labour will fix the roads, they love roads and also won’t let rma, taniwhas or west coast snails get in the way

    • McFlock 13.3

      So they found a nat farmer who thought it was brilliant – the cousin also repeatedly said that people were frustrated because “nothing’s happened”. Stirling defense there.

      But whatevs. If the House was the other way and little had said exactly what Brownlee said and in exactly the same tone, you’d be recycling the “Angry Andy” bullshit.

    • swordfish 13.4

      An erudite little bon mot from alwyn “Wadestown wadicals”

      Oh dear. You’ve been reading Karl Du Fresne again, haven’t you, darling. We’ve warned you about that before.

      For the sake of your – and Du Fresne’s – enlightenment, the affluent burghers of Wadestown almost always lean Right. Certainly they’re rather more evenly split than similarly affluent Auckland suburbs (in the east and on the North Shore) … but, then, that’s true of most higher income suburbs in Wellington City. Less likely to be money-grubbing little Neo-Lib fucks, possessing the ethics and integrity of your average alley cat.

      • alwyn 13.4.1

        Really?
        “Wadestown almost always lean Right”.
        Have you ever looked at the numbers?
        There were 2 polling places in Wadestown in the electorate.
        One had 388 votes for the Labour candidate and 134 for the National one.
        The second polling place had 115 for the Labour candidate and 55 for the National one.
        United Future and the Greens also did well.
        Where did you leave your brain when you came out with that rubbish, darling?

        • swordfish 13.4.1.1

          Oh, alwyn, you are a card !!!

          Fancy you thinking you could pull that little sleight of hand and get away with it scot-free !!! … Whatever were you thinking, my love ???

          Now, darling, if someone wanted to deduce whether or not the good burghers of Wadestown lean to the political Right … do you think they should expend their (no doubt limited) time and energy on:

          (1) The Party Vote ?

          or

          (2) The Candidate Vote ?

          I’d suggest most rational people (and, more specifically, people who – unlike your good self – weren’t desperate to win an argument through fair means or foul) would go very much for the former … given that, you know, the Party Vote expresses someone’s core political allegiance.

          It’s a matter of great regret that you’ve tried to quietly smuggle in the Candidate Vote figures … apparently on the off-chance that I … and others … wouldn’t notice.

          So, let’s be serious about this for a minute, shall we Doll ? …

          Wadestown 2014 General Election Party Vote

          Right Bloc …. 52%

          Left Bloc …… 45%

          So, I mean, come on alwyn, don’t piss me about, you young scamp. You’re just wasting everyone’s time.

        • swordfish 13.4.1.2

          Oh and of course that wasn’t your only swifty, was it alwyn.

          You also very conveniently managed to “inadvertently forget” that this is Peter Dunne’s seat and a clear majority of Nats strategically cast their vote in his direction.

          Once again, how endearing of you to think that you could get away with focussing exclusively on the Labour and National candidates’ figures in this very particular electoral context.

          You’ve obviously had a bit of an old go at including some sort of get-out clause by lamely admitting: “United Future and the Greens also did well.” Ummmm, you know UF’s candidate – one Peter Francis Dunne – actually won the seat, don’t you ? And – combined with candidates from the other parties of the Right – beat the aggregate Left Bloc candidates’ vote in Wadestown …

          Wadestown Aggregate Candidate Vote

          Aggregate Right … 51%

          Aggregate Left … 49%

          But, as I say, the Candidate Vote is very much a red herring on your part, in any case.
          I expected better from a loyal member of the old guard. A defender of old-fashioned aspirational middle class values. Where’s your sense of honour, my good man ???

          • alwyn 13.4.1.2.1

            Oh darling.
            Your masterly defence of the indefensible completely sweeps me of my feet.
            Oh, how I swoon under your influence.
            Reality however sets in.
            Bugger off you creepy old bastard.
            You may be desperate but you really are pushing it to say that the Wadestown Wadicals voted for the Labour Party candidate even though they were pro National.
            Are you really that stupid?

            • swordfish 13.4.1.2.1.1

              “you creepy old bastard”

              Hilarious !
              I think you may be looking in the mirror, there, alwyn
              (not least, given that you’re (1) male, (2) appreciably older than me (3) in a permanent state of anger and (4) somewhat obsessive, displaying more than a few classic stalking tendencies on this site)

              “you really are pushing it to say that the Wadestown Wadicals voted for the Labour Party candidate even though they were pro National.
              Are you really that stupid?”

              alwyn, alwyn, alwyn. This really is as weak as dishwater – it just won’t do. You’re insulting our collective intelligence. The Right won the Party Vote – and, indeed, the Candidate Vote – in Wadestown. (not that the latter tells us anything about their core political allegiance) And very few Tories in the suburb (or in the seat as a whole) both (1) Party Voted National and (2) Candidate Voted Labour’s Andersen.

              Now, I know you’re uber-competitive, alwyn. You clearly hate losing. But time to give up, my Tory chum. You’ve lost, you’ve been caught out telling a few little porkies. Your somewhat hysterical lashing out highlights the fact. Sort yourself out, Move on and let’s hear no more about it.

              • alwyn

                “insulting our collective intelligence”.
                Really? You claim to have some? Little is exhibited.

                ” And very few Tories in the suburb (or in the seat as a whole) both (1) Party Voted National and (2) Candidate Voted Labour’s Andersen”
                Without access to the voting papers and being able to determine who cast the vote it is completely impossible for you to know how they voted.
                Surely you didn’t breach the privacy around the vote and check how people voted.

                “Move on and let’s hear no more about it”
                I’m sorry if the truth upsets you. You really aren’t obliged to read what I say you know. If it upsets you don’t bother reading it. It will only play havoc with your blood pressure readings and cause ringing in your ears.

  14. Adrian 14

    For Alwyn and his cohort of excuse makers for the Nats, the people at Kekerengu are died – in- the-wool Nat voters, have been for decades and decades.
    The last time the Nats lost the country in 1999, on that same coast the local Nat MP Doug Kidd had to escape out the back window of a local hall in the middle of a campaign meeting because he told the local farmers after 3 years of drought that they would “have to become more efficient”.
    Cockies stayed away in droves from voting in 1999, they don’t forget arrogance quickly.

    • alwyn 14.1

      I’m not sure what relevance you anecdote has to what I was saying.
      Probably helps support my statement above that
      “They were then, and probably still are now, a great deal blunter in their speech than townies ever were” I suppose.

      “The last time the Nats lost the country in 1999”. Amazing. We must have been living in alternate universes in 2002 and 2005. I really thought that Labour, not National formed the Government after those General Elections.

    • mac1 14.2

      In 1999, Doug Kidd even went on the list rather than face the wrath of locals. The winning National candidate, Dr Scott, actually got less votes than the Labour candidate in Marlborough, which was the larger part of the Kaikoura electorate along with North Canterbury), primarily because Marlburians did not like the so-called Bradford electricity reforms which arbitrarily and arrogantly took away ownership from the community of the power generation arm of Marlborough Power.

      At a public meeting then Doug Kidd was asked from the podium where he was when the power reforms stripped away community ownership of Marlborough generation, because he voted for them.

      The backlash was evident in Marlborough.

      With MMP now offering two votes for party and candidate, there is a way in which locals can express their dissatisfaction with this arrogance and dismissiveness, along with just staying away. Witness Northland last year.

      1999 was the end of three terms of National, fronting with an unelected PM Shipley; parallel with today.

      • alwyn 14.2.1

        Is that like Trevor Mallard?
        Poor old Trevor. Gone but certainly not missed.

        • mac1 14.2.1.1

          Alwyn, I would hate to face you on a turning pitch, such is your spin. Your googly above is so difficult to read that even you might not know which way it will turn. However, I won’t be out for a duck.

  15. Ethica 15

    After the 7.8 earthquake Gerry Brownlee and the Government wanted to put a big fence around the Wellington CBD and forget about it, much as happened in Christchurch. But our new Labour Mayor Justin Lester stood up to them. A few buildings were identified as dodgy (and some dodgy building owners were discovered in the process) and barricades put up only around them. Justin has also had to negotiate hard to get employment and other support for those affected, from a Government reluctant to support the Capital. He is an example of how a leader from the left works – ethically and collaboratively. It’s not about photo ops, empty promises and ego.

    • alwyn 15.1

      I am sure you have some evidence for this story?
      The fact that Brownlee thought some checking should be done before announcing that everything was fine seemed quite sensible to me.

    • Infused 15.2

      lol, bullshit. they did not. it was a few lefties that wanted to do that ‘building safety, ctv etc’.

      shutting down the cbd would have killed wellington.

  16. Guerilla Surgeon 16

    If they voted for National, they’ve got every right to complain often and loud. After all, there’s no one else to blame, they own this.

  17. David 17

    I just want to know one thing about our latest seismological fuck up, where are the Army engineers? We have a few of them, we train them for disaster relief, we have the capability to put their earthmoving equipment on the shore, where it is needed. We should have sent the senior most army engineer to oversee the relief efforts, this is what we pay them for, not for fighting rich men’s wars. Instead we have the National Party, who are probably doing sweet fuck all because they’re waiting for their mates to put the tenders for the big jobs. It’s one great big cock sucking, commercial clusterfuck. No wonder Bill is happy to oversee this shit show, he is the man that gypped the system so we’d pay his mortgage for him, the troughing dickweed.

    • { ” Instead we have the National Party, who are probably doing sweet fuck all because they’re waiting for their mates to put the tenders for the big jobs. ” }

      And here is a person who has NAILED IT.

      Go to the top of the class.

    • saveNZ 17.2

      I agree David. When disaster strikes I would like to see the defence force turning up and saving lives within hours of any disaster and being the workforce to repair the roads and infrastructure quickly.

      Rather than having the current fight between 10 different groups public, private, COO’s, SOE’s to co ordinate most of them, with little interest in a fast outcome but more in ensuring they maximise their profit while reducing any liability for themselves. That is their priority to their ‘shareholders’ not getting critical infrastructure back and saving lives!

    • Ad 17.3

      We don’t have the US Army Engineers Corps.

      We just have the Armed Forces – small though they are – who did their job throughout the crisis.

      You’ve just watched too many war movies.

      • David 17.3.1

        You are right, I have watched too many movies. But I am still right, the army has all that capability, what they don’t have is the go ahead to operate without the go ahead from Government. They are capable of more than filling sandbags, operating shovels or shifting food and water.

        • Muttonbird 17.3.1.1

          According to Ad this was is the best disaster response by any government anywhere in the history of all disasters.

          So much so that locals are turning up to press pieces to vent their anger 4 weeks after the event.

  18. Macro 18

    I have a friend who lives to the north of Coromandel. I asked him last night how long it took him to get home.
    “It depends if the road is open or not”, he replied.
    Some may recall this storm of over 2 years ago:
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/10207751/Coromandel-after-the-storm
    Yes they are still working on repairing the damage done to the road by that storm over 2 years ago.
    Damage such as this on coastal and roads around cliffsides can take years to repair to a safe condition. And it’s not just Kaikora where people have to wait.

  19. peterlepaysan 19

    Honeymoon?
    The nat titillating toy boy has just walked leaving the dreary ex treasury policy wonk to continue his secondary school level economics hypotheses that chronic underfunding of state agencies is good for us.

    double dipton bill has been left a poisoned chalice of his own making.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Neuralink and You: A Human-AI Symbiosis
    Becky Casale Elon Musk reckons his Neuralink brain implant is much more than a medical device–that one day it will drive a symbiosis between humans and artificial intelligence. “Good morning! I’m Dr Benedict Egg and I’ll be supervising your Neuralink insertion today. Do you have any questions?” “Yes, Doc. ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    20 mins ago
  • Liam Hehir: Our obsession with American politics
    Many New Zealanders take a strong interest in US politics, with the death of Supreme Court Judge Ruth Bader Ginsberg being the latest example. Liam Hehir wonders if it very wise for New Zealanders to get so worked about it.   Many politically engaged New Zealanders are now furiously ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 hour ago
  • COVID: Back to Level 1
    After stamping the Coronavirus out via strict lockdown between March and May, New Zealand went through a good three months without any community cases. Then a local outbreak in Auckland rather buggered things up last month. Auckland’s been in level 3 and level 2.5 for the past six weeks. ...
    1 hour ago
  • Climate Change: Climate injustice
    Who's causing our skyrocketing emissions? As with most of our other problems, It's the rich: The wealthiest 1% of the world’s population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, according to new ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 hour ago
  • Good riddance
    The border closure and resulting lack of foreign slave-workers is driving the fishing industry out of business: One fishing company is effectively out of business while others are bracing for large financial hits as the deepwater New Zealand industry, unable to get skilled foreign workers into the country, have ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 hours ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #38
    Story of the Week... Toon of the Week... Coming Soon on SkS... Climate Feedback Claim Review... SkS Week in Review... Poster of the Week... Story of the Week... The tipping points at the heart of the climate crisis Many parts of the Earth’s climate system have been destabilised by ...
    6 hours ago
  • Anyone for Collins?
    In the absence of national public opinion polls, we have had to make do in recent weeks with other guides to voter intentions. Those guides, such as the Auckland Central poll, the incidence of google enquiries and the responses to Vote Compass questions, have suggested, not unexpectedly, that Labour is ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    7 hours ago
  • Crusher’s fiscal malfunction
    Crusher Collins - National Party leaderWe all know that the National Party is desperate to gain some traction during this election campaign and have been throwing pretty much everything at the Labour Party in order to try and undermine Jacinda Ardern and what the Coalition Government has achieved. But unfortunately ...
    9 hours ago
  • Much of the commentariat’s reporting of the most recent GDP figure was misleading and unhelpful. The prize for the stupidest remark about the GDP figure for second quarter 2020 (2020Q2) released on Thursday (17 Sept) goes to Judith Collins, whose response to Grant Robertson’s comments indicated she did not ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    21 hours ago
  • Love and Hate as Complementary Revolutionary Acts
    by Gearóid Ó Loingsigh goloing@gmail.com (19/09/2020) Che Guevara said that a true revolutionary is motivated by love i.e. love of the oppressed, the poor, the children dying from preventable illnesses. This phrase of his is true but has been used by reformists and their more hippy wing have taken advantage ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    1 day ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #38
    A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, Sep 13, 2020 through Sat, Sep 19, 2020 Editor's Choice Get to Net-Zero by Mid-Century? Even Some Global Oil and Gas Giants Think it Can Be Done A report by a ...
    1 day ago
  • Tax cuts for all!!! (except you, you, and you)
    With the National Party this week announcing a new policy of tax cuts to spice up the election campagin. MyThinks went along to the launch and afterwards we spoke to the party’s finance spokesperson Paul “Golden Touch” Goldsmith. MT: Thanks for speaking to us Mr Goldsmith. PG: No. Thank you. ...
    My ThinksBy boonman
    2 days ago
  • Great Waves Washing Over New Zealand
    Always to islanders danger Is what comes over the seas ‘Landfall in Unknown Seas’ (Allen Curnow)Six economic issues external to New Zealand, which will greatly impact upon us. 1.         The Diminishing Global Dominance of the US. Since 1941 America has dominated the world economically and politically. Probably it could ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand has role to play in resolving crisis on ‘geopolitical fault line’, Helen Clark says
    By Geoffrey Miller New Zealand should continue to champion human rights in Belarus amidst an ongoing crackdown on protests by the country’s regime, former Prime Minister Helen Clark says. Protests in the country often referred to as ‘Europe’s last dictatorship’ erupted after the country’s disputed presidential elections on August 9 ...
    Democracy ProjectBy Geoffrey Miller
    3 days ago
  • Euthanasia referendum: How to cut through the emotions
    Jacqui Maguire, registered clinical psychologist This podcast episode highlights how difficult it is to have effective conversations about euthanasia due to how polarised people’s views are. I’m a clinical psychologist, with a passion for science communication. In early 2020 I founded the podcast Mind Brew, with an aim to make psychological ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    3 days ago
  • Why we need cameras on boats
    In case anyone needed further convincing, there's another example today of why we need cameras on fishing boats: reported seabird bycatch doubled during a camera trial: Commercial fishers operating off Auckland's coast around vulnerable seabirds are twice as likely to report accidentally capturing them when cameras are on ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Graham Adams: The religious right’s campaign to spike the euthanasia referendum
    In the leadup to the euthanasia referendum, an array of conservative Christian political organisations is running an expensive campaign to sow doubt about the safety of assisted dying. Graham Adams argues that these religious forces know that Christian arguments aren’t convincing the public, but that it is in the public ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    3 days ago
  • Opportunistic looting
    The National Party has spent the last six months acting horrified at the cost of supporting people through the pandemic and banging on about how the debt must be repaid. So what was their economic policy released today? Massive tax-cuts for the rich, of course! National has walked back ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Uncomfortable Choices.
    Dangerous Times: This will be the choice confronting those coming of age in the 2020s. Embrace Neoliberalism’s belief in racial and sexual equality; adopt its secular and scientific world view; and cultivate the technocratic, multicultural, global outlook required of those who keep the machinery of hyper-capitalism humming. Or, throw your ...
    3 days ago
  • Tony Burton: Covid and benefit payments
    It would be a great time to reform the benefit system, according to former Deputy Chief Economic Advisor at the Treasury, Tony Burton. He argues the complexity of benefit system means that it’s failing to achieve its difficult three core objectives, which form an “iron triangle”.   New Zealand’s benefit ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    3 days ago
  • Talking tax: How to win support for taxing wealth
    Tax Justice UK, September 2020 Serious tax reform is on the political agenda for the first time in decades due to the coronavirus crisis. As this debate hots up it is important to understand what people think about public spending, wealth and tax. Tax Justice UK, along with Survation and ...
    Closing the GapBy Tracey Sharp
    3 days ago
  • Getting Tough.
    Not Mucking Around: With upwards of 800 dead from the virus’s resurgence in the Australian state of Victoria, leniency is not on Premier Daniel Andrews’ agenda. The Victorian Police are cracking down hard on the protesters the Australian press has labelled "Covidiots".IMAGES OF POLICE, some in riot gear, others on ...
    3 days ago
  • Media Link: Nuclear strategy, then and now.
    Although I had the fortune of being a graduate student of some of the foremost US nuclear strategists of the day (1970s) and later rubbed shoulders with Air Force and Naval officers who were entrusted with parts of the US nuclear arsenal, I seldom get to write or speak about ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    4 days ago
  • The Chinese List.
    News that Zhenhua Data, an arm of China Zhenhua Electronics Group, a subsidiary of the military-connected China Electronic Information Industry Group (CETC), maintains a list of 800 New Zealanders on a “Overseas Key Information Database” that contains personal information on more than 2.4 million foreign individuals, has caused some consternation ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    4 days ago
  • Things that grow fast, and things that surprise us
    Marie Becdelievre January 2020. The number of news article mentioning coronavirus exploded and anxious voices whispered about a global pandemic. Whisper? To me, it was only a whisper. I tend to learn about the world through non-fiction books, conferences, and academic research rather than news and social media, so ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    4 days ago
  • Skeptical Science New Research for Week #37, 2020
    2,082,476,000,000,000 Viability of greenhouse gas removal via the artificial addition of volcanic ash to the ocean  (not open access, unfortunately) walks us through the numbers on a particular means of CO2 removal, addition of volcanic tephra to the ocean. The mechanism is straight chemistry and the cost is fully an order of ...
    5 days ago
  • Barbados to become a republic
    Barbados is planning to remove the queen as head of state and become a republic in time for the 55th anniversary of its independence in 2021: Barbados has announced its intention to remove the Queen as its head of state and become a republic by November 2021. [...] Reading ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • Party Like It’s 1989: Bait and Switch is a Bad Look, Mr Hipkins
    At the 2017 election, the New Zealand Labour Party promised a Fees Free Policy for tertiary students. Basically, it would make the first year of university education free in 2018, with a second year in 2021, and a third in 2024. It also promised to restore Post-Graduate access to the ...
    5 days ago
  • Will the tropics eventually become uninhabitable?
    Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz What is the impact of temperature increases in the tropics? ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    5 days ago
  • A first-hand look: What it’s like to live in a 2020 California wildfire evacuation zone
    This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Daisy Simmons It felt like 100 degrees in my in-laws’ Grass Valley, California, kitchen, but at least the lights were on and for the moment we were safely “distanced” from the Jones Fire. We’d just finished dessert, after pizza and a movie ...
    5 days ago
  • A flaw in our electoral transparency regime
    A key part of our electoral funding regime is a requirement for some transparency around donations, on the basis that if we can find out who has bought our politicians (typically after we have voted for them) then everything is alright. There are a lot of problems with that regime ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Don’t Steal This Book
    On “In Defense of Looting” Matt Taibibi takes an entertaining look at this generation of woke activists and how they compare with Abbie Hoffman the iconic anti-Vietnam war counter-culture figure of the 1960s On Thursday, August 27th, the same day Donald Trump formally accepted the Republican nomination, National Public Radio ...
    RedlineBy Daphna
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change: Carbon prices must rise
    When Parliament introduced the Emissions Trading Scheme, it was worried that carbon prices might get too high. So it introduced a "fixed price option", allowing polluters to pay the government $25 in the place of surrendering credits. The result was predictable: after we were thrown out of international carbon markets ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change: Disclosure
    The government will finally be requiring large New Zealand companies to disclose their climate change risks: New Zealand finance companies will be made to report on climate change risk, Climate Change Minister James Shaw has announced. The policy will force around 200 large financial organisations in New Zealand to ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Tackling the hard issues – trust and relationships
    By Claire Grant, Genomics Aotearoa Communications Manager Community consultation is becoming an increasingly important aspect of research programmes in New Zealand, and with that comes the art of relationship building. Engagement between scientists and user-groups is certainly nothing new. But as stakeholder involvement becomes more of a requirement for science, ...
    SciBlogsBy Genomics Aotearoa
    6 days ago
  • Equality Network – September Newsletter
    Read the Equality Network newsletter here ...
    Closing the GapBy Tracey Sharp
    6 days ago
  • The Left’s Lost Allies.
    Rebels In A Wrong Cause: The truly frightening thing about Jami-Lee Ross’s and Billy Te Kahika’s success in persuading thousands of New Zealanders that Covid-19 is just another trick, just another way of stealing away their power, is realising just how many of them once marched at the Left’s side. ...
    6 days ago
  • Legal Beagle: Low-Hanging Fruit
    In a couple of months, the 53rd Parliament will meet in Wellington, and approximately 120 MPs will be sworn in, many of them for the first time.They will all have political goals, some aligning with their party platforms, some not, some complex, and some simple, but they will gain one ...
    6 days ago
  • Closing the Gap thinks that Labour’s proposal to raise the top tax rate is great but………
    Media Statement For Immediate Release 10th September 2020 The income and wealth inequality lobby group, “Closing the Gap” thinks the Labour proposal a great start says Peter Malcolm, a spokesperson for the group. But they need to be aware of what many of the rich do and of what do ...
    Closing the GapBy Tracey Sharp
    7 days ago
  • Climate Change: No nonsense
    ACT is pushing a "no-nonsense climate change plan". What does it involve? Repealing the Zero Carbon Act and Emissions Trading Scheme, reversing the fossil-fuel exploration ban, and allowing mining on conservation land. In other words, repealing any policy which might actually reduce emissions. Which is the very definition of nonsensical. ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    7 days ago
  • My Climate Story: Coming full Circle
    This blog post is a follow up to my recap of Al Gore's Climate Reality Leadership Training I recently participated in. One of the exercises we were asked to complete was to write about our respective "Climate Story". This is a slightly updated version to the one I had submitted during ...
    7 days ago
  • A bill to criminalise wage theft
    Wage theft is a problem in New Zealand, with a widespread practice of forcing employees to work without pay, and regular cases of underpayment and exploitation. One reason why its such a widespread problem is impunity: rather than a crime, wage theft is merely a tort, dealt with by the ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Liam Hehir: What the voting age debate tells us about our disconnected political media
    New Zealand’s media and online politics often reflect the values of liberal and progressive agendas. According to Liam Hehir, the current proposals to lower the voting age to 16 years – which the media overwhelming supports – is indicative of a wider mismatch with society, which is not good for ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • Why Pay Taxes?
    My wife and I, through a combination of good luck and good management, have managed to retire in comfortable circumstances. We celebrate our good fortune by making relatively small but regular donations to a range of good causes – to rescue services like the rescue helicopters, St John’s Ambulance and ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    1 week ago
  • Now everyone’s a statistician. Here’s what armchair COVID experts are getting wrong
    Jacques Raubenheimer, University of Sydney If we don’t analyse statistics for a living, it’s easy to be taken in by misinformation about COVID-19 statistics on social media, especially if we don’t have the right context. For instance, we may cherry pick statistics supporting our viewpoint and ignore statistics showing we ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • More timid bullshit from Labour
    Over the weekend, Labour released its welfare policy: an increase in benefit abatement thresholds. And that's it. Faced with clear evidence of ongoing hardship among beneficiaries and a call from its on Welfare Expert Advisory Group to raise core benefits by between 12 percent and 47 percent, Labour's response is ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • The Police Kill as Part of their Social Function
    by Gearóid Ó Loingsigh (Bogota; 09/11/2020) The murder of Javier Ordoñez in the neighbourhood of Villa Luz in Bogotá, Colombia at the hands of two policemen brings to the fore the issue of police violence and its function in society. First of all we should be clear that we are ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    1 week ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #37
    Story of the Week... La Niña Update... Toon of the Week... Quote of the Week... Coming Soon on SkS...  Poster of the Week... SkS Week in Review... Story of the Week... Humans exploiting and destroying nature on unprecedented scale – report Animal populations have plunged an average of 68% ...
    1 week ago
  • The 2019 measles epidemic in Samoa
    Gabrielle Po-Ching In November 1918, the cargo and passenger ship Talune travelled to Apia, Samoa from Auckland, carrying a number of passengers who had pneumonic influenza. From these passengers stemmed the biggest pandemic Samoa had ever seen. With around 8,500 deaths, over 20% of the country’s population at the ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Shifting all Isolation/Quarantine Facilities to a Single Air Force Base: The Need for a Critical Ana...
    Prof Nick Wilson*, Prof Michael Baker In this blog the arguments for and against shifting all COVID-19 related isolation/quarantine facilities to a single air force base at Ōhakea are considered. The main advantage would be a reduction in the risk of border control failures, which can potentially involve outbreaks ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    1 week ago
  • The difference between Green and Labour: a tale of two Finance Ministers
    So the Greens co-leader James Shaw recently made a mistake. In his role as Associate Finance Minister approving funding for “shovel-ready” projects, he fought hard for a private “Green school” to get funding to expand their buildings and, therefore, their student capacity. There are many problems with what he did: ...
    Cut your hairBy calebmorgan
    1 week ago
  • Bryce Edwards: Political Roundup – The missing election policy on free dental visits
    Over the last three years there have been growing calls for the government to provide dental services under the health system – universal free dental care. This is because at the moment there’s an anomaly in which teeth are regarded as different from the rest of the body which means ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #37
    A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, Sep 6, 2020 through Sat, Sep 12, 2020 Editor's Choice With California ablaze, Newsom blasts Trump administration for failing to fight climate change Trinity River Conservation Camp crew members drown ...
    1 week ago
  • Letter to the Editor
    Dear Sir, As we head into the run up to the upcoming election I feel it is my duty to draw your attention to the lack of fun we are currently forced to ensure by the Adern regime. In their efforts to keep the nation’s essential workers, health compromised people, ...
    My ThinksBy boonman
    1 week ago
  • Participating in Al Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Corps Training
    It finally happened: about 13 years after first watching Al Gore’s documentary “An Inconvenient Truth” (AIT) in 2007 when it became available in Germany, I recently completed the Climate Reality Leadership Corps Training! Participating in this particular training had been on my to-do list for quite some time but it ...
    1 week ago
  • Dysfunctional Design
    Windows 95 is famous for requiring the shutting down the system by clicking ‘start, like stopping your car by turning the ignition key on. Why are so many interfaces so user-unfriendly? The Covid app to register your entering premises can be so clumsy. Sometimes I have signed in, sat down ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    1 week ago
  • Josh Van Veen: Can we trust the polls?
    Is the 2020 election result really the foregone conclusion that the polls and commentators are suggesting? Josh Van Veen suggests otherwise, pointing to some of the shortcomings of opinion polling, which could ready some politicians to say “bugger the pollsters” on election night.   In November 1993, opinion polls foretold ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • The UK wants climate action
    Back in 2019, six select committees of the UK Parliament established a Citizen's Assembly to investigate how to respond to climate change. The Assembly's deliberations were forced online by the pandemic, but it has finally reported back, and overwhelmingly supports strong action: Taxes that increase as people fly further ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • In the US, the End of Days.
    I am feeling a bit impish today and so for no particular reason I thought I would share this thought, which I first posted over on twitter: “Hurricanes, wildfires, floods, heatwaves, street protests, armed vigilante militias, a lethal pandemic and a corrupt authoritarian using the federal government for partisan and ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    1 week ago
  • Government too slow in deploying military to assist with Covid-19 response, former defence minister ...
    Wayne Mapp (Photo: Tsmith.nz via Wikimedia) A former Minister of Defence says the government was too slow to involve the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) in New Zealand’s response to Covid-19. But Wayne Mapp, a National MP from 1996-2011 who served as Minister of Defence for three ...
    Democracy ProjectBy Geoffrey Miller
    1 week ago
  • Underwhelming
    Transport is our second biggest polluter after agriculture, making up 17% of our national emissions. Cars and trucks emit 15 million tons of CO2 every year. So, if we're serious about tackling climate change, we need to eliminate this entirely. Public transport and better urban design will be a key ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Five things we know about COVID-19, and five we don’t
    Five things we’ve learnt 1. We know where the virus ultimately came from We know that the virus originally came from bats, and most probably a species of horseshoe bat in South East Asia. However, the spike protein in SARS-CoV-2, which allows the virus to attach to cells and infect ...
    SciBlogsBy Robert Hickson
    1 week ago
  • Stewardship land is conservation land
    The Greens' greatest disappointment while in government this term has been the failure to implement a ban on mining on conservation land. Promised by Jacinda Ardern immediately after gaining power, it had long been assumed that the problem was NZ First (who have a long history of environmental vandalism). But ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • The price of Green co-operation just went up
    If they get into Parliament, everyone expects the Greens to form a coalition with Labour. But James Shaw has said that that might not be the case, and that they might instead choose to sit on the cross-benches: The Greens are prepared to forego a coalition or confidence and ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Swimming with whales: you must know the risks and when it’s best to keep your distance
    Chantal Denise Pagel, Auckland University of Technology; Mark Orams, Auckland University of Technology, and Michael Lueck, Auckland University of Technology Three people were injured last month in separate humpback whale encounters off the Western Australia coast. The incidents happened during snorkelling tours on Ningaloo Reef when swimmers came too close ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Driving Out The Money-Changers Of Reactionary Christianity.
    Den Of Thieves: They describe themselves, and the money-making rackets they dignify with the name of church, “Christian”, but these ravening wolves are no such thing. The essence of the Christian faith is the giving of love – not the taking of money. It is about opening oneself to the ...
    1 week ago
  • Could academic streaming in New Zealand schools be on the way out? The evidence suggests it should b...
    David Pomeroy, University of Canterbury; Kay-Lee Jones, University of Canterbury; Mahdis Azarmandi, University of Canterbury, and Sara Tolbert, University of Canterbury Academic streaming in New Zealand schools is still common, but according to recent reports it is also discriminatory and racist. Also known as tracking, setting and ability grouping, streaming ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • A Time To Begin Again.
    A New Holy-Day: Perhaps, by accepting this gift of Matariki from the first arrivals in Aotearoa, we late arrivals, shorn of our ancestors’ outlandish fleeces, can draw strength from the accumulated human wisdom of our adopted home. Perhaps, by celebrating Matariki, we can learn to take ownership of our colonial ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour’s tax trauma victims and how they might help the Greens
    If there was any doubt left, we can surely call it now. Time and date. End of. Finito. Perhaps you thought you saw a flickering eyelid or a finger move? You were wrong. Labour has given up on tax reform for the foreseeable future. One of the key remaining left/right ...
    PunditBy Tim Watkin
    2 weeks ago
  • Bryce Edwards: Political Roundup – Labour gives up on tax transformation
    Will the rich get richer under Labour’s latest tax policy? Based on the analysis in reaction to yesterday’s announcement, the answer would seem to be yes. The consensus from commentators is that inequality and severe economic problems will remain unchanged or even be made worse by Labour’s new policy. Although ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour on energy: Business as usual
    Labour has released its energy policy, and its basicly business as usual: bring forward the 100% renewable target to 2030, build pumped storage if the business case stacks up, restore the thermal ban and clean car standard (but not the feebate scheme), and spread a bit of money around to ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 weeks ago
  • Climate Change: Overshoot
    California is burning down again. In Oregon, the city of Medford - a town the size of Palmerston North - has had to be evacuated due to the fires. In the Atlantic, Tropical Storm Rene has become the earliest "R"-storm to form since records began, beating the previous record by ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 weeks ago
  • Says it all
    What's wrong with Labour? The end of yesterday's RNZ health debate says it all: Do you have private health insurance? Reti: "I do." Hipkins: "Yes, I do." Hipkins is Minister of Health. But it turns out that he won't be waiting in the queue with the rest ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 weeks ago
  • Secret Lives of Lakes
    McKayla Holloway The helicopter carries a team of four Lakes380 scientists and me; we hug the Gneiss rock walls that tower over Lake Manapouri. It’s arguably one of New Zealand’s most well-known lakes – made famous by the ‘Save Manapouri’ campaign of the 1970s. My chest is drawn back into ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    2 weeks ago
  • Winning Joke: Why The Traditional Left Will Just Have To Live With Rainy-Day Robertson’s Disappoin...
    Rainy-Day Man: Is Labour’s tax policy a disappointment? Of course it is! But it’s the best the Traditional Left is going to get. Why? because Labour’s pollsters are telling them that upwards of 200,000 women over the age of 45 years have shifted their allegiance from National to Labour. (Where else, ...
    2 weeks ago

  • $27million investment in global vaccine facility
    The Coalition Government has committed to invest $27 million in COVID-19 vaccine development through the global COVAX Facility, Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “The COVAX Facility is a key part of our COVID-19 Vaccine Strategy to obtain safe and effective vaccines. It allows us to invest in a high-quality, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Government backing Māori landowners
    The Government will provide up to $1.69 million through the One Billion Trees programme to Māori landowners to make their whenua more productive through the planting of forests, both native and exotic, and improve economic and environmental outcomes, Forestry Minister Shane Jones has announced. “Around 1.5 million ha of land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New tools to make nature more accessible
    People planning to head outdoors now have a resource that lets them know how accessible an area is for people with varying levels of mobility, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced today. The Halberg Foundation, Sensibel, and the Department of Conservation (DOC) have launched Accessibel, a new tool which helps ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • PGF makes Māori history more accessible
    One of the most significant battle sites of the 1860s Land Wars will receive $2.96 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to improve the site and help tell the New Zealand story to visitors, Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. Nanaia Mahuta ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Making it official: The journey of te reo Māori | Kia whakapūmautia: Ngā piki me ngā heke o te r...
    The journey towards recognising Māori as an official language and taonga has been captured as a web series and launched today during Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, announced Associate Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni. “Te reo Māori is a living language, and understanding its significance, and pathways to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Better-than-forecast GDP reflects decision to protect New Zealand
    Today’s better-than-forecast GDP figures show the expected impact of the decision to act quickly to protect New Zealanders from the global COVID-19 pandemic. GDP fell 12.2% in the June quarter from March, reflecting decisions to close New Zealand’s borders and enter Alert Level 4. “This result was better than the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Boost for COVID-19 related Pacific education needs
    The Government is investing $39.7 Million over four years to support the educational needs of Pacific learners and families in the regions hardest hit by COVID-19, with Auckland getting an immediate boost, Associate Minister of Education Jenny Salesa says.   “Like all New Zealanders Pacific families want learners to do well ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More resources for kiwi conservation
    New Zealand’s goal of 100,000 kiwi by 2030 is being helped by an extra $19.7 million in funding to accelerate iwi and community efforts to protect kiwi, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced. “$19.7 million of Jobs for Nature funding is being invested in kiwi conservation activities including increased predator ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Improving access to affordable electricity
    Ensuring New Zealanders can get the best deal on their electricity takes a step in the right direction today with the South Island launch of the EnergyMate pilot run by the Electricity Retailers’ Association, says Minister of Energy and Resources, Dr Megan Woods. EnergyMate is an industry-led programme providing coaching ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government achieves 50 percent women on state boards
    Minister for Women Julie Anne Genter announced today that the Government has reached its target of 50 percent on women on state sector board and committees – setting a new record level of women on state sector boards. “This Government is committed to having more women in leadership roles - ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Record transport investment to help economic recovery and save lives
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford released today the final Government Policy Statement on land transport (GPS) 2021 which outlines the planned $48 billion investment in services and infrastructure over the next decade. “The final GPS supports our Government’s five-point plan for economic recovery by confirming our record investments in transport infrastructure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Advancing clean energy technology
    Three ambitious and cutting-edge research programmes that will lift New Zealand’s advanced energy technology research capability over seven years, have been supported by Government today, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. The projects will each receive a share of $40.7 million investment from the Strategic Science Investment Fund. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Major milestone reached in Pike River Re-entry
    The critical area for forensic examination known as Pit Bottom in Stone has been reached in what is a major milestone for the Pike River re-entry project, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little announced. “The infrastructure located in Pit Bottom in Stone is of very significant interest in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Economic recovery guides Govt response to retirement income policy review
    The Government is working on how New Zealand’s retirement income policies and settings can best support Kiwis in light of the COVID-19 economic recovery, with the help of the Retirement Commissioner’s latest review, Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Kris Faafoi said. “The Retirement Commissioner’s three-yearly review into New Zealand’s retirement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Iwi community hub opens in Murupara
    A new digital hub and development centre in Murupara will be instrumental in growing the region’s productivity, said Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau at the official opening of two community initiatives today. “I’m pleased to be here celebrating a significant milestone for two projects set to make a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • PREFU shows economy doing better than forecast
    PREFU shows economy doing better than forecast Unemployment to peak at 7.8%, down from 9.8% forecast in the Budget Year-to-June accounts show tax revenue, debt and OBEGAL better than forecast Global forecast downgraded as COVID-19 second waves and uncertainty grows Balanced plan to support critical public services, manage debt and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Spruce-up for Ōtaki community facilities
    The Kāpiti Coast town of Ōtaki will receive $1.4 million in Government funding for two projects providing scores of jobs for locals while improving community facilities, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. The Māoriland Charitable Trust will receive a $900,000 Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) grant to upgrade the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • PGF funding for Jobs for Nature programme
    The Provincial Growth Fund will provide $11.88 million to fund fencing and waterway projects nationwide that will improve the environment and create jobs in their communities, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. “These projects will create more than 100 jobs nationwide with work starting within the next couple ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Procurement to promote jobs, Māori and Pasifika businesses and sustainability
    As part of the COVID-19 recovery, the Government has strengthened its procurement rules to ensure its annual $42 billion spend creates more jobs, uses more sustainable construction practices and results in better outcomes for Māori and Pasifika, Government Ministers announced today.   Economic Development Minister Phil Twyford says the $42 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Timaru’s Theatre Royal to be upgraded and new heritage facility built
    The Government is supporting a major upgrade of Timaru’s iconic Theatre Royal and the construction of a new connected Heritage Facility museum and exhibition space with $11.6 million from the Government’s Infrastructure Fund, Jacinda Ardern announced today. “We heard the call from the community and the council. The Theatre Royal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • District Court judge appointed
    Chrissy Montague (formerly Armstrong), barrister of Auckland has been appointed as a District Court Judge with Family Court jurisdiction to be based in Wellington, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Ms Montague commenced practice in Auckland in 1987 and went into general practice dealing with Wills, Estates, Trusts, Conveyancing, Relationship Property ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Approval given to Commercial Film and Video Production Proposal
      A Proposal to provide for the development and operation of commercial film and video production facilities in areas of Christchurch has been given the go ahead. Hon Poto Williams, Associate Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration, has approved the Proposal, which was prepared and submitted by Regenerate Christchurch. Minister Williams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Supporting a thriving wānanga sector to benefit Māori learners
    As part of the Government’s focus on building closer partnerships with Māori and enhancing the quality of, and access to, Māori medium education, a payment of $8 million will be made to Te Wānanga o Raukawa in partial recognition of its Waitangi Tribunal claim (WAI 2698), Associate Education Minister Kelvin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature boosts efforts to restore Kaimai-Mamaku
    The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has announced a $19 million investment over four years in an important forest restoration project involving a partnership between the Department of Conservation, iwi/hapū, the Bay of Plenty and Waikato Regional Councils, community conservation groups and organisations such as Forest and Bird across the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand first in the world to require climate risk reporting
    New Zealand will be the first country in the world to require the financial sector to report on climate risks, the Minister for Climate Change James Shaw announced today. The changes build on the huge progress this Government has made to tackle the climate crisis. “Today is another step on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Economic data highlights impact of Auckland moving out of Level 3
    Economic activity across the Auckland region and the country bounced back to levels experienced under Alert Level 1 following Auckland’s move out of Alert Level 3, analysis in the Treasury’s latest Weekly Economic Update shows. The analysis of economic data since Auckland’s move out of Level 3 shows: Auckland card ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PM statement on Cabinet COVID-19 Alert Level review
    Takiri mai te ata, ka ao, ka ao, ka awatea, tihei mauriora! Tātou katoa ngā iwi o Aotearoa, tēnā koutou! Tēnā tātou e whakanuia ana i te wiki nei, te wiki o te reo Māori Greeting to you all from Otepoti, Dunedin.  This week is the Māori Language week and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More mental wellbeing services for young people in regions
    More mental health and addiction services are available for young New Zealanders in Rotorua and Taupō, Wairarapa, South Canterbury, Dunedin and Southland from next month, Health Minister Chris Hipkins and Associate Health Minister Julie Anne Genter say. “The Government is serious about making sure New Zealanders struggling with mental health ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government joins forces with Central Otago communities to clean up waterways
    The Manuherekia catchment in Central Otago is the third exemplar catchment to be targeted as part of the Government’s plan to clean up waterways by supporting community-led programmes.   Environment Minister David Parker said the Manuherekia catchment is vitally important to the people of Central Otago.  “The Manuherekia rises in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government confirms new Dunedin Hospital design
    The Government has agreed on a preferred design for the new Dunedin Hospital featuring two separate buildings, and has provided funding for the next stages of work.   Minister of Health Chris Hipkins says Cabinet has approved in principle the detailed business case for the new hospital, giving people in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Join the one in a million reo Māori moment
    New Zealanders across the country are set to mark history as part of the Māori Language Week commemorations led by Te Taura Whiri i te reo Māori this year.  Māori Development Minister, Nanaia Mahuta says the initiative will mark history for all the right reasons including making te reo Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Education initiatives add to momentum of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2020
    More than 1000 teachers, support staff and school leaders have graduated from a programme designed to grow their capability to use te reo Māori in their teaching practice, as part of the Government’s plan to integrate te reo Māori into education, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. Being trialled ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • The Toloa Tertiary Scholarships for 2021 aims to increase Pacific participation in STEM
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio, says the Toloa Tertiary Scholarships which aims to encourage more Pacific student numbers participating and pursuing STEM-related studies in 2021, are now open. “These tertiary scholarships are administrated by the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP), and are part of MPP’s overall Toloa ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Financial support for timber industry
    Four Bay of Plenty timber businesses will receive investments totalling nearly $22 million through the Provincial Growth Fund to boost the local economy and create jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. Rotorua-based sawmill Red Stag Wood Solutions will receive a $15 million loan to develop an engineered ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand seeks answers to the Gulf Livestock 1 tragedy
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters has announced that New Zealand is exploring the viability of working with partners to conduct a search for the black box on the Gulf Livestock 1. “We know how much it would mean to the families of those on the ship to understand more about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government backs East Coast marine infrastructure
    Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has today announced the Government is supporting the creation of new marine infrastructure in northern Te Tairāwhiti on the North Island’s East Coast. The Government has approved in principle an allocation of up to $45 million to support the construction of a marine transport facility at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government mourns the passing of Epineha Ratapu
    E Epineha. Ka tangi te iwi, ki a koe e ngaro nei i te kitenga kanohi. Kua mokemoke to whānau, to iwi, te motu whanui. Haere ki o matua, tipuna. Haere ki te okiokinga tuturu mo te tangata. Haere i runga i te aroha o ngā reanga kei muri i ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • October round of fisheries decisions
    Catch limits will be increased for 26 fisheries and reduced for three fisheries as part of a regular round of reviews designed to ensure ongoing sustainability of fisheries resources. Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash has announced decisions following a review of catch limits and management controls for 29 fish stocks. The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand to host Bledisloe Cup in October and ready to attract other international sporting event...
    The Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson says while it is disappointing the Rugby Championship will not be held in New Zealand, the country will host two Bledisloe Cup games in October and has the capacity in managed isolation facilities to host other international sporting events. “We offered flexible quarantine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Hundreds more regional apprenticeships
    Up to 350 more people in regional New Zealand will gain a pathway to trades training through a $14 million government investment in apprenticeships, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. The apprenticeships are part of the $40 million Regional Apprenticeship Initiative (RAI) announced in June. The funding comes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago