web analytics

Extinction Rebellion on Lambton Quay

Written By: - Date published: 7:10 am, October 7th, 2019 - 76 comments
Categories: climate change, Environment - Tags: , , ,

There was some suprisingly positive MSM coverage on the weekend leading into today’s Extinction Rebellion actions in Wellington. Extinction Rebellion NZ starts off an international week of climate rebellion designed to encourage governments to act in meaningful terms on the climate crisis.

From Stuff,

She was born on the brink of World War II and lived through the threat of communism then the violence of the Springbok apartheid protests.

But it is now, aged 80, that Mary Rose is putting her stake in the ground as one of the lead protesters, as climate action group Extinction Rebellion try to blockade part of Wellington on Monday.

“I have been listening to people talking about climate change for the past 25 years – people of vision and wisdom,” the great-grandmother and Quaker said.

“There is all this feeling helpless, what can we do.”

Police and local authorities on the face of it seem largely accepting of the intended disruption and are planning accordingly,

A police spokesperson said police were “aware of protest activity planned”, but for “operational reasons” would not provide details on staff resourcing.

Police intended to ensure safety and “uphold the law” while “recognising the lawful right to protest”.

XR spokesperson Dr Sea Rotmann wrote an explanation of XR NZ’s actions at the Spinoff,

Extinction Rebellion does not aim to provide a solution to climate change but to act as a fire alarm. We want to wake up the sleeping inhabitants of our burning home and to draw attention to the pyromaniacs (aka the fossil fuel industry) still busy setting rooms on fire. 

Just like the climate strikers, we want to mobilise others to join the rebellion for climate and environmental justice. A rebellion we know has been fought for centuries by generations before us with many different voices, especially those of indigenous activists, which we must listen to now. Too many of us did not listen soon enough, and we have spent too long hoping that these problems would just go away or that “someone” would fix it. We have been complacent, and now it is almost too late.

XR started in the UK a year ago with a series of non-violent direct actions that shut down important parts of central London and other UK cities in October and then again in April. Building on many other, longstanding climate action movements XR was instrumental in taking climate action to a new level. Coinciding with the release of an IPCC report that finally told the bald truth, the rise of Extinction Rebellion forced awareness of the seriousness of the emergency into the public consciousness.

Tortoise Media in the UK published a report last week on the April actions with a focus on who the protestors are and why their arrests are important.

The court waiting rooms fill up every Friday, but the authorities are only a fraction of the way through processing the 1,076 climate activists arrested during Extinction Rebellion’s April shutdown.

Those who plead guilty are given a chance to make a speech. On a swelteringly hot August afternoon, Tim Ponton, 68, a retired NHS specialist in prosthetics, stood up. “I feel desperate. I feel outraged that successive governments have failed to protect me and my family,” he told the court. 

There’s a cool interactive map not too far down the page that shows how the April actions played out over the fortnight and the London landscape.

For a week-and-a-half, XR’s rebels took control of five high-profile spaces in the capital: Oxford Circus, Marble Arch, Waterloo Bridge, Piccadilly Circus, and Parliament Square.

They held the sites in style. It took police five days to tow away a fuchsia pink boat named ‘Berta Cáceres’ after the murdered Honduran environmentalist. Activists had docked the boat, daubed with the words “tell the truth”, in the middle of Oxford Circus junction. As the mast was dismantled and the boat finally removed, the crowd chanted: “we have more boats.” Elsewhere, a half-pipe adorned with XR logos turned Waterloo Bridge into a temporary skate park.

Stretches of central London were essentially pedestrianised by blockades. More than 50 bus routes were diverted, affecting the journeys of half a million passengers. The West End shopping district lost an estimated £12 million in the first three days of the action, according to Jace Tyrell, who represents businesses in the area. Stores on Oxford Street, London’s flagship shopping district, reported falls in sales of up to 20 per cent. The police force deployed more than 10,000 officers to the streets of London – in an operation which cost more than £16 million and 243,000 hours of officer overtime. It was the largest police operation in modern British history.

In case it’s not clear, the objective here is to cause as much disruption to the state as possible until it changes. Affecting the consumer economy, sustained tying up of the courts and eating into the police budget, along with regular disruptions to the normal business of city life, are potent motivators for change. Key to XR’s strategy is the research that shows sustained actions from 3.5% of a nation’s population have never failed to effect radical change.

Ten days ago 3.5% of the NZ population took to the streets in the climate strike.

Extinction Rebellion have three key demands,

1. tell the truth about the climate and ecological emergencies
2. take real action now
3. create a citizens’ assembly

XR are not presenting a complex, detailed plan of what we should do. That’s for our governments. What XR are doing is pushing governments to do their job properly in regards to CC and ecology. They’re also saying that in that process we should shift to more participatory democracy rather than relying on simple representative democracy (which patently isn’t working and isn’t suitable to the task at hand given the timeframes).

Kia kaha XR in Wellington today.

Updated: Live coverage,

at Stuff

@ExtinctionNZ

 

 

76 comments on “Extinction Rebellion on Lambton Quay ”

  1. Sacha 1

    To pre-empt some long-winded beige badgering this time, let's just note that our crusader for the sensible and moderate takes this position:

    Extremist climate-change deniers propose doing nothing, and are not out in numbers disrupting, protesting or campaigning for anything but the status quo.
    Changing nothing is a risk, but changing a lot without knowing where that may lead is a much bigger risk.

    The very definition of fear-driven conservatism. And those three demands are "too vague", you hear. Gee, I wonder why young people have lost respect for their grey elders.

    • Sacha 1.1

      From the sidebar, I/S notes that different change movements use (gasp) different approaches.

      In the wake of last Friday's climate strike, Peter McKenzie had an article in The Spinoff about protest strategies. The school strike movement is "polite" and cooperates with those in power because that's its kaupapa – its led by schoolkids who understandably don't want to risk arrest.

      But there's more than one way to protest, and as the climate crisis bites, then continued government inaction is likely to push people towards more confrontational styles of protest.

      And on Monday, the same impolite protest tactics are coming to Wellington

  2. mpledger 2

    Beautiful singing at the protest. :->

  3. ieuan 3

    'push people towards more confrontational styles of protest.'

    And how long is the general public going to tolerate confrontational protest that starts to disrupt their everyday life? Because instead of actually convincing people that you are right you are just going to start to piss people off and they will stop listening to your message.

    • weka 3.1

      "And how long is the general public going to tolerate confrontational protest that starts to disrupt their everyday life?"

      We almost never have protest that disrupts the public's every day life.

      The point of ER is to raise awareness of the seriousness of CC including the timeframe for acting. That requires disruption. The research on the 3.5% principle shows that it works and that governments and the public come around to the needed change.

      • ieuan 3.1.1

        'We almost never have protest that disrupts the public's every day life.'

        Blocking roads is disrupting everyday life and shutting down airports is clearly part of the next stage for protests, that's going to be super popular.

        • weka 3.1.1.1

          Being popular isn't the initial goal, it's to raise awareness and to encourage the government to act.

          Criticism of ER for annoying people misses the point and strategy of the actions, and how they are carried out. eg ER do a lot of public messaging apologising to the general public for the disruption and explaining why it is necessary. On the ground they facilitate things as best they can to help anyone who needs to get through urgently.

          This isn't in your face, angry protest with no regard for the public. It's smart, well thought through, and known to work strategy that is *for the public.

          • OnceWasTim 3.1.1.1.1

            Unproductive activity @ weka (going forward), although I do appreciate your willingness to engage in a 'conversation' in this space. Euan …. oops the exceptional ieuan (with an I), is never going to get it if its comfyness is threatened.

            How very VERY dare it

      • Formerly Ross 3.1.2

        There was a protest in Lambton Quay only a week or so ago. So to say it hardly ever happens is nonsense. That’s twice in less than two weeks!

        As for any meaningful protest requiring disruption, I am not convinced. By all means disrupt the big emitters and the politicians. But that isn’t happening.

        • weka 3.1.2.1

          ER have blocked access to MBIE's building this morning. MBIE are the govt department who manages oil exporation in NZ. ER are on target re the big emitters and govt.

          Twice in two weeks when we've had more than 30 years to act on preventing climate change. Just a little perspective there 😉

          • Gosman 3.1.2.1.1

            I thought the government has already banned new oil exploration.

          • Roflcopter 3.1.2.1.2

            The part of MBIE which deals with oil is not in that building.

            • OnceWasTim 3.1.2.1.2.1

              Why am I not surprised you're that intimately familiar with MBIE. But never mind eh @ roflcopter – think of the productivity gains at MBIE today if the peons are able to work from home, out from under the clutches of their managers and spin doctors. Hopefully XR had the good sense to block the Maginnity Street car park entrance.

              On the downside, Astoria might take a hit

          • veutoviper 3.1.2.1.3

            "In case it’s not clear, the objective here is to cause as much disruption to the state as possible until it changes. Affecting the consumer economy, sustained tying up of the courts and eating into the police budget, along with regular disruptions to the normal business of city life, are potent motivators for change. "

            IIRC you live rurally in the Deep South of the SI. So to give this protest "a little perspective", from someone who lives and worked (in government) in Wellington CBD for many years, IMO this ER protest will be causing very little disruption to either "the big emitters or government" regardless of what you are seeing in the videos of the protests and/or onTV etc as:

            1. The Wellington offices of "the big emitters" and/or of the oil/energy companies actually undertaking exploration etc such as OMV are nowhere near the protest and are in different parts of the CBD – IF they even have offices in Wellington City.
            2. In respect of "government" as meaning executive/political Government, Stout Street and the protest are a little way from the Parliament precinct itself and the other locations housing MPs etc and so will not be disrupting these functions. Parliament is also currently in recess with most politicians away from Wellington.
            3. As Roflcopter says at 3.1.2.1.2 below, the divisions of MBIE that deal with energy/oil etc are not in the Stout Street building or in buildings close by, so are not affected by the protest. The only government Dept in Stout Street where the protest is taking place is MBIE (ie other parts unrelated to the energy industry etc) and while it will be disrupting these government employees and their work, the Stout Street building actually has a number of (controlled entry) back doors in other streets.
            4. Stout Street itself is effectively a small street off the main thoroughfare of Lambton Quay which means the protest will be disrupting very little traffic (foot or vehicle) on the main CBD streets/roads. In actual fact NZ Police are probably laughing about it as it is probably an "ideal" location from the point of view of containment and control.

            Quite bluntly, I don't think it will raise more than a 'meh' from many of Wellington's workers etc whether or not they are affected by the protest.

            • weka 3.1.2.1.3.1

              It's a rolling set of actions over the day. They're at the ANZ now, and afaik still have some intersections occupied.

              There are between 600 and 1,000 people on the streets of Wellington doing the first large scale XR action in NZ. Compare to the progress of the UK XR actions over the past year. This is about building a movement as much as what can be achieved by one action. Movement building is exactly on point with XR strategy. I expect there to be more people at the next one.

              The value in targeting the MBIE building is to focus attention on the govt's support for oil exploration and the problems with that. Locking out 1200 workers is not insignificant. I'm assuming that the value would be decreased if they're gone for the oil MBIE building, but it's true I don't know Wellington.

              Workers aren't the target, although I think there is value in having 1200 civil servants having their day disrupted, in terms of forcing conversation. It seems highly unlikely they will all go meh and not think about climate change today.

              MPs have televisions, radios and internet 😉 They don't have to be at work to see what is going on.

              • weka

                thing is, MPs, MBIE workers and managers, MSM, police, local councils, NZTA, Wellingtonians, tourists, all the people affected today have families and friends with children and grandchildren. This is why we will win. Because climate change affects everyone, but it affects the people we usually care most about (kids) the most.

                This is how change works. NZ is already at the threshold of the 3.5% of the population needed to effect real change, what we need now is actions that get more people involved. If XR NZ got 1,000 people on the streets today for direct action (rather than a march), that's fucking impressive.

                Added to that, this is a training exercise as much as anything. XR are working over many days this week, but the direct action is today only. What do you think they're doing for the rest of the time?

              • Oh how the principles of 'protest' have been lost over the past few decades since the neoliberal religion has become the raison d'etre.

                It's as much about publicity and symbolism (drawing attention to it all) as it is about disruption.

                If it was merely about disruption, XR could have simply 'outsourced' it all to me for a very handsome fee (plus GST).

                And I probably would have subcontracted it to a subcontractor whose mission it would have been to turn up with a couple of orange cones, a step ladder and a pair of hedge clippers whilst wearing an orange vest.

                Most likely the disruption would have gone unnoticed but by the time MBIE had contacted their service provider who'd contact their contractor, who in turn contacted their subcontractor, and then their subcontractor, it could have lasted a lot longer. Think of the symbolism of all that too. The contractor's subcontractor's subcontractor could probably have been able to claim they only had IELTS 6.0 and didn't understand the implications of it all whilst receiving the princely sum of $7 or 8 for putting it all right.

                Alternatively, the driver of a cherrypicker on P who's simply forgot to lower it when driving along the thoroughfare.

                There is a purpose to protest which isn't simply about disruption

                • Phil

                  It's as much about publicity and symbolism (drawing attention to it all) as it is about disruption.

                  You think there hasn't been sufficient attention given to Climate Change already, to 'draw attention' to it?

        • Climaction 3.1.2.2

          requires goal too, not just vague aspirations.

          Why not promote Boyan Slat and his work

          https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/remember-kid-who-invented-way-clean-ocean-plastic-hes-back-and-its-happening

          Rather than demand a peoples assembly. ER is looking like a greenwashed version of the occupy movement.

          • weka 3.1.2.2.1

            they have really clear goals.

            • Sacha 3.1.2.2.1.1

              We must have missed the talking points circulating this morning.

              • weka

                lol. You'd think bullet pointing something in a post would make it easier to see even if it is a the bottom.

            • Climaction 3.1.2.2.1.2

              1. tell the truth about the climate and ecological emergencies

              – Being told all the time. No one is denying it and deniers are shunned. this is implying there is some world wide vast governmental deep state conspiracy against climate change news being reported as such. almost as if stuff didn't have a whole section dedicated to the promotion of the news from the viewpoint of that it's real and happening and needs to be reported as such.

              2. take real action now

              Like stop the other 249,000 people in wellington going about their day. I used to live in wellington. it's got one of the highest rates of public transport in the country. It's community are very waste averse and recycle what ever they can, whenever they can. Taking real action by not promoting the works of Boyan Slat et al when what appears to be being demanded is actually the forced redistribution of wealth.
              3. create a citizens’ assembly

              to do what? talk some more? like paris etc. 3 is almost a complete contradiction of 2 and will prevent real action on climate change while we listen to every small and single issue person have their say.

              • Sacha

                Please search 'citizens assembly' before you comment on it.

                • Climaction

                  if 5g comes up as a leading cause of climate change at all you owe me an ethically sourced flat white

                  • Sacha

                    Perhaps we can find an amenable civil servant to lie in front of a bulldozer on Bowen, take one for the team.

        • weka 3.1.2.3

          "By all means disrupt the big emitters and the politicians. But that isn’t happening"

          Oh yea of little faith 😀

  4. weka 4

    Media coverage: Live coverage links at bottom of post.

    The Spinoff,

    If you are reading this when it’s published on Monday morning, I am currently locked to an Extinction Rebellion-branded car that is blocking a road in the centre of Wellington.

    https://thespinoff.co.nz/society/07-10-2019/today-for-the-first-time-in-my-life-im-being-a-troublemaker-this-is-why/

  5. weka 5

    XR NZ press release

    Extinction Rebellion is blocking the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) on Stout Street, Wellington.

    MBIE is New Zealand’s ministry for oil, gas and minerals.

    The blockade is the first of 60 disruptive events planned by Extinction Rebellion in cities around the world.

    Six people are attached with metal pipes to a pink car at the Lampton Quay end of Stout Street.

    The cars wheels have been removed to make it immovable.

    One person is attached to a three metre pink boat at the Balance Street end of Stout Street.

    Sixteen people are attached to each other surrounding the boat in a circle.

    MBIE and OMV

    • In April 2018, the New Zealand government banned the issuing of new offshore oil and gas licences. However, they didn’t revoke permits that were issued before the ban. In total, 14 offshore oil and gas exploration licences remain active in New Zealand.

    • OMV holds seven exploration permits, which allow them to search for new oil and gas in previously untouched areas of New Zealand’s ocean. These include the Taranaki Basin, the Great South Basin (off Otago) and the Pegasus Basin (off Wairarapa).

    • OMV is one of just a handful of companies that are controversially drilling for oil in the pristine Arctic.

    • OMV expect to begin exploratory drilling in Taranaki from November 2019.

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1910/S00058/extinction-rebellion-block-mbie.htm

  6. weka 6

  7. Formerly Ross 7

    A handful of protestors outside MBIE will no doubt have MPs and the big emitters trembling with fear. The protestors will be gone soon, and nothing will have changed (apart from a drop in productivity at MBIE). Meanwhile protests in Hong Kong began four months ago, are continuing and aren’t even about climate change.

  8. Phil 8

    If you really want to make a statement about how climate change will affect Wellingtonians, I reckon the most impactful thing you could do would be to protest *on* the northbound lanes of the urban motorway before 5pm rush hour starts.

    Choose the physically lowest point of the road (just south of the interchange?) and you're effectively simulating how rising sea levels will flood parts of the city and make it impossible for anyone to get home.

    • weka 8.1

      There's a balance to be had between raising awareness and just pissing people off. In the UK the initial road blocks were timed in short bursts In part to avoid the police, but also I think to acclimatise locals to what was going on and why it's important. I would guess in Wellington, the focus is on disrupting the government, getting good media coverage, and showing locals what's going on without putting them off.

      We will see what they have planned for later in the day, although they're meant to finish up at 5pm.

  9. weka 9

    The die in at the ANZ. Then the rising up.

  10. weka 10

    Now at OMV

  11. weka 11

  12. Anne 12

    Thank-you weka for the updates.

    I look at those young people and they could easily be the young people of the 60s and 70s who passionately protested the proliferation of nuclear weapons throughout the world and the presumption of France to believe they were entitled to commit terrorism on our territory in the name of nuclear testing in our Pacific back-yard. We were just as committed and although I was not one of those who took to the waters of the Waitemata, I was with them in spirit. For our efforts many of us suffered at the hands of the state apparatus – some more than others depending on circumstances – and were treated like communist-inspired criminals.

    And we were proved right!

    Now the grandchildren of those protesters have risen up and are doing it all over again.

    And what's more they are right too!

  13. cleangreen 13

    smileyWe need to keep pressure on this Government to get moving on climate change now not sit around waiting for someone else.

    I remember the "ban the bomb" era when NZ stuck out on the world stage so why not now,

    when we consider with a future that will wind up resembling a nuclear war had been dropped on us all.

    Jacinda let's do this!!!!!!!

    Great effort today by the ER crew, (applaud all around for you all.) especially the 82 yr old lady. ra- ra.

  14. Gareth Wilson 14

    1. tell the truth about the climate and ecological emergencies
    2. take real action now
    3. create a citizens’ assembly

    What happens if the citizens' assembly ends up disagreeing with Extinction Rebellion?

  15. SPC 15

    The only way is to bring the knuckle dragging nations into climate change action.

    If the Paris Accord nations required all imports to have an identifiable carbon footprint (carbon tax import tariff accordingly), then they can make it so. Only if those who lower their carbon footprint are advantaged in the market will change then happen.

  16. Molly 16

    Chris Hedges has an article about Extinction Rebellion on Truthdig: A Time to Rebel.

    A couple of quotes that give an idea of strategy:

    The group stresses what it calls a “pre-social-media age” strategy for organizing. It has created decentralized structures to make decisions and issue demands. It sends out teams to give talks in communities. It insists that people who participate in the actions of Rebellion Extinction undergo “nonviolent direct-action” training so they will not be provoked by the police or opposition groups.

    “Most of the recent mass mobilizations have been social-media-fueled,” Hallam said. “Consequently, they have been chaotic. They are extremely fast mobilizations. Social media’s a bit like heroin. It’s a high, but then it collapses, like we’ve seen. It becomes chaotic or violent. A lot of modern social movements put stuff on social media. It gets clogged up with trolls. There are lots of radical-left organizations arguing about different privileges. We’ve circumvented that and gone straight to the ‘common people,’ as you might say. We’ve held meetings in village town halls and city halls. We go around the country in a 19th-century sort of way, saying, ‘Hey guys. We’re all fucked. People are going to die if this isn’t sorted out.’ The second half of the talk is: There’s a way of dealing with this called mass civil disobedience.

    “For 30 years we’ve had one political metaphysic, reform,” he said. “You either reform or you are irrelevant. But now, we have two massive, exponentially increasing structural faults—the inequality problem and the climate problem. A lot of people—because of path dependency dynamics—have worked for 30 years in this lost-cause sort of space. They’re desperate for change. For 30 years, they’ve been putting their money on reform. The tragedy—and you can see this in the history of political struggle going back hundreds of years—is there’s a flip where the reformists lose control. They’re still living in the past world. The revolutionaries, who everyone thinks are ridiculously naive, suddenly come to the fore. It’s usually a quake. It’s not a gradualist thing. It’s a double tragedy because it’s a quake and the revolutionaries usually aren’t organized. I think that’s what’s happening now. It has very big implications for [resistance against] fascism. Unless you have a clearheaded mass mobilization on the left, which is connected with the working class, you’re not going to be able to stop the fascism.”

    • Molly 16.1

      Another quote from the article, about the ten working principles of XR UK:

      The group has 10 working principles that center on nonviolent resistance. These principles are:

      We have a shared vision of change: to create a world that is fit for generations to come.

      We set our mission on what is necessary, mobilizing 3.5% of the population to achieve system change – using ideas such as “momentum-driven organizing” to achieve this.

      We need a regenerative culture, creating one that is healthy, resilient and adaptable.

      We openly challenge ourselves and this toxic system, leaving our comfort zones to take action for change.

      We value reflecting and learning; as we follow a cycle of action, reflection, learning and planning for more action, we learn from other movements and contexts as well as our own experiences.

      We welcome everyone and every part of everyone, and work actively to create safer and more accessible spaces.

      We actively mitigate for power, breaking down hierarchies of power for more equitable participation.

      We avoid blaming and shaming; we live in a toxic system, but no one individual is to blame.

      We are a nonviolent network; using nonviolent strategies and tactics is the most effective way to bring about change.

      We are based on autonomy and decentralization, collectively creating the structures we need to challenge power.

      Anyone who follows these core principles and values can take action in the name of Extinction Rebellion.

    • weka 16.2

      wow, that is really good, thanks. I got a bit down last night seeing a number of lefties on twitter criticising XR NZ for blocking the intersection in Wellington and thus apparently sending the wrong message to bus users (e-buses!). Also, that the wrong MBIE building was targeted (but no analysis of why they chose the big building not the oil and gas one).

      Critiques that might have made some kind of sense if they'd been done in the context of ER strategy, but people seemed to think this was about optics and being careful to not piss off the public if you want to get support. I was disappointed in what looked like a relative dearth of understanding about strategy from otherwise politically smart people. I could be wrong, maybe they are all reading the strategy and philosophy too, but it didn't come across like that.

      (there was also some strong criticism from Māori, which is a different kete. Still sorting out my thinking on this).

      • Molly 16.2.1

        Agree with the dismissal of criticism that comes from an optics based perspective.

        Don't use Twitter, but interesting that there has been some criticism from some Māori. But not unexpected, given the diversity of opinion on this topic in all demographics, including Māori and Pakeha .

        However, the working principles given above, align with many Māori protests. Non-violence alongside non-compliance.

        During a recent assignment, one of the topics was comparing Māori efforts towards conservation against what is considered more mainstream conservation groups. It is interesting to see that despite aligned outcomes, most conservation groups work in isolation or parallel to Māori efforts in the same areas. And even if there are partnerships or acknowledgement, the dominant partner was often the non-Māori player.

        I did have a look in particular at climate change initiatives from Māori at the time, but the only particular organisation I could find, was not viewing the situation in its entirety, and like many others who are comfortable in the status quo, was almost welcoming the opportunities – read as "business strategies" that may result from transitional changes.

        There is a Māori Climate Change Commission, Commissioner: Donna Awatere Huata. However, there doesn't seem to be either much detail or activity online. So, I don't know how that is going.

        What are the criticisms from Māori being expressed – and who is expressing them?

        • weka 16.2.1.1

          There's critique of XR for being white-led. Also for not working with or acknowledging the climate activism of Māori. And that their tactics may be damaging to what Māori are doing. So yes, the dominant partner, or not even in partnership, same as it ever was really. There are Māori in XR NZ too, so diverse views of course.

          Kera O'Regan is good to follow. https://twitter.com/KeraSauR/status/1181330600491307008

          I just started following Haylee Koroi. This tweet has got me thinking more deeply https://twitter.com/HayleeKoroi/status/1181104206758834176

          There's been a fair bit of criticism in the UK from PoC about XR there. My own view is that it's about time white middle class Brits threw themselves on the gears of the machine, so I'm holding two contradictory views about XR at the moment without a clear sense of how that will be resolved. I hope to write a post on this.

          • weka 16.2.1.1.1

            btw, if you set up a twitter account, even if you don't tweet it will be easier to read twitter threads that people link.

            • Molly 16.2.1.1.1.1

              I have a strong conviction that climate change and climate justice must be considered and resolved as a single issue.

              Naomi Klein has a chapter in her book, This Changes Everything that specifically speaks about the environmental movement having existed in parallel or isolation to indigenous movements in Canada and the United States.

              In particular she speaks of the Standing Rock protests, which have become inclusive protests as non-indigenous activists have joined in. I can't find a quote specifically about this online, but did find this one from a Nation article written shortly after Trumps election:

              But this isn’t just about Trump voters and the stories they may have told themselves. We have arrived at this dangerous moment also because of the stories about “the other” told on the progressive side of the political spectrum. Like the one that holds that when we fight against war and climate change and economic inequality, it will benefit black people and Indigenous people the most because they are most victimized by the current system.

              That doesn’t work either. There is too long and too painful a track record of left movements for economic justice leaving workers of color, Indigenous people, and women’s labor out in the cold.

              To build a truly inclusive movement, there needs to be a truly inclusive vision that starts with and is led by the most brutalized and excluded. Rinaldo Walcott, a great Canadian writer and intellectual, issued a challenge a couple months ago to white liberals and leftists. He wrote:

              Black people are dying in our cities, crossing oceans, in resource wars not of our making…. Indeed, it is obvious that Black peoples’ lives are disposable in a way and fashion that is radically different from other groups globally.

              It is from this stark reality of marginalization that I want to propose that any new policy actions in the North American context ought to pass what I will call the Black test. The Black test is simple: it demands that any policy meet the requirement of ameliorating the dire conditions of Black peoples’ lives… When a policy does not meet this test, then it is a failed policy, from the first instance of its proposal.

              • Molly

                Reading the tweets, there seems to be justified criticism of the greater impact on those who cannot afford alternative options, especially in respect to transport etc. Also, agree about the appropriation of ill-used Te Reo, in a misguided attempt to Māori wash, XR NZ's protests. The failure to listen and obliviousness is apparent in that exchange.

                I recall reading about the Montgomery bus boycotts, where organisers arranged alternative transport modes for those participating. Something to consider for XR if disruption and civil disobedience tactics are affecting less-powerful demographics more than others.

                • Molly

                  … not "those participating" should be "those impacted". Some of the volunteers who were participating were specifically allocated to provide transport to move commuters. The impact on the bus company was financial, the impact on commuters was lessened as much as practicable.

                  • weka

                    that would be reasonable if this was an ongoing action targeting buses, but it was a one off and buses weren't the target. That surprised me about the criticism. I get the issue where poorer people are affected and hope XR look at that, but most of the debate I saw was about people confused that XR were disrupting public transport and/or electric buses, because aren't they the solution to climate change? Stopping PT ebuses for an hour doesn't affect the good that PT does re CC. It was an odd argument. Some were saying it was about optics and messaging, but again this seems a poor understanding of what XR are doing. This isn't a climate strike.

                    • Molly

                      …." but most of the debate I saw was about people confused that XR were disrupting public transport and/or electric buses, because aren't they the solution to climate change? "

                      OK. I'm guessing this kind of redirection of message comes from people who are comfortable with going off-topic for the enjoyment they get out of discussing in the abstract, or intentional for those who are deniers, or just don't want to make any changes. This may need to have a standard response drafted, so that time is not wasted on irrelevancies.

                      I also don't know how movements will go with inclusion in NZ. Like you, I hope we will manage better than we have in the past.

                    • weka []

                      some of the people were solid lefties. I was surprised.

                      Btw, here’s a thread about keeping transit routes around hospitals open, and XR having info on change bus routes

                • weka

                  "Like the one that holds that when we fight against war and climate change and economic inequality, it will benefit black people and Indigenous people the most because they are most victimized by the current system."

                  Yep. So over left wing men using women like this too. Trump is better than Clinton because Trump won't bomb women in the middle east who are the most poor/marginalised (US women are all privileged by comparison). Stupid stuff.

                  Re XR, now that there is an existing movement, and with such momentum, I'm more inclined to see it as an opportunity for, in NZ, Pākehā activists to upskill on how to work with Māori. The response in that twitter thread wasn't great, hard to think we are still so bad at this.

                  Re the UK movement, I think there is value in white middle class people leading this particular movement, but the issues of class and ethnicity still need to be addressed. Maybe it's about how XR share power with other movements?

                  In NZ it's different I think, because if at base it's all about the land/nature then really Pākehā should be centering rebellion power with Māori. I'm not sure how to do this, and there are some points being made that I don't fully understand yet (eg how XR here might be harming Māori climate action. I can see in the UK the potential for the state to go more authoritarian and that this will harm PoC more than white XRers. Not sure if that's the issue in NZ).

                  I will try and put up some posts here, but I'm feeling a bit glum by how much ground got lost in the past 18 months at TS and it feels very low diversity atm.

          • Molly 16.2.1.1.2

            Coincidentally, looking at something else a five minute video came up for Haylee Koroi on the Step Up for Tāmaki website, where she talks about her perspective on climate change.

  17. marty mars 17

    Heroes one and all. The beginning is now and these actions will escalate imo. The mood has changed – the bullshit is unacceptable – it will be very uncomfortable for us all, but change has started for real and the wheels are coming off… imo.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • New South Wales travel pause to be lifted tomorrow
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says the current travel pause with New South Wales will lift tomorrow – subject to no further significant developments in NSW. “New Zealand health officials met today to conduct a further assessment of the public health risk from the recently identified COVID-19 community cases in Sydney. It has been determined that the risk to public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • March 15 Collective Impact Board appointed
    The voices of those affected by the March 15 mosque attacks will be heard more effectively with the establishment of a new collective impact board, Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment Priyanca Radhakrishnan announced today. Seven members of the Christchurch Muslim community have been appointed to the newly established Board, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • More young Kiwis supported with mental health and addiction services
    Nearly quarter of a million more young New Zealanders will have access to mental health and addiction support in their communities as the Government’s youth mental health programme gathers pace. New contracts to expand youth-specific services across the Northland, Waitematā and Auckland District Health Board areas have been confirmed, providing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New hospital facilities mean fewer trips to Auckland for Northlanders
    Northlanders will no longer automatically have to go to Auckland for lifesaving heart procedures like angiograms, angioplasty and the insertion of pacemakers, thanks to new operating theatres and a cardiac catheter laboratory opened at Whangārei Hospital by Health Minister Andrew Little today. The two projects – along with a new ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Fair Pay Agreements to improve pay and conditions for essential workers
    The Government is delivering on its pre-election commitment to implement Fair Pay Agreements which will improve wages and conditions, as well as help support our economic recovery, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Fair Pay Agreements will set minimum standards for all employees and employers in an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Establishment of the new Māori Health Authority takes first big step
    Sir Mason Durie will lead a Steering Group to provide advice to the Transition Unit on governance arrangements and initial appointments to an interim board to oversee the establishment of the Māori Health Authority. This Group will ensure that Māori shape a vital element of our future health system, Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Cycle trails move up a gear in Central
    Work on new and upgraded cycle trails in Queenstown, Arrowtown and Central Otago is moving up a gear as two significant projects pass further milestones today. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has announced new funding for the Queenstown Trails Project, and will also formally open the Lake Dunstan Trail at Bannockburn ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Picton ferry terminal upgrade consent fast-tracked
    The planned upgrade of the Waitohi Picton Ferry terminal has been approved under the fast-track consenting process.  Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the decision by the expert consenting panel to approve the Waitohi Picton Ferry Precinct Redevelopment Project.    The project will provide a significant upgrade to the ferry facilities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel with New South Wales paused
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced his intention to pause Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand while the source of infection of the two cases announced in Sydney in the last two days is investigated.  Whole genome sequencing has linked the case yesterday to a recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Covid-19 immigration powers to be extended
    The passing of a bill to extend temporary COVID-19 immigration powers means continued flexibility to support migrants, manage the border, and help industries facing labour shortages, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said. “Over the past year, we’ve made rapid decisions to extend visas, vary visa conditions and waive some application requirements ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • “Supporting a Trade-Led Economic Recovery”
    Trade Policy Road Show SpeechManukau, Auckland   Kia ora koutou – nau mai, haere mai ki Manukau, ki Tāmaki.   Good morning everyone, and thank you for this opportunity to discuss with you current global challenges, opportunities and the Government’s strategy in support of a trade-led recovery from the economic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Building consent numbers at an all-time high
    A record 41,028 new homes have been consented in the year ended March 2021 March 2021 consent numbers the highest since the 1940s Record number of new homes consented in Auckland The number of new homes consented is at an all-time high, showing a strong and increasing pipeline of demand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Whānau-centred support for parents and tamariki
    Up to 60 whānau in Counties Manukau will be supported through the first three years of their parenthood by a new whānau-centred model of care, said Associate Health Minister, Hon Aupito William Sio. “Providing this support to young parents is something we have to get right. It’s a priority both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • NZ backs moves to improve global access to COVID vaccines
    New Zealand welcomes and strongly supports the announcement made by the United States Trade Representative to work for a waiver of IP protections on COVID-19 vaccines at the WTO, Trade Minister Damien O’Connor said. “New Zealand supports equitable access to COVID vaccines for all. No one is safe from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Tourism communities: support, recovery and re-set plan
    TIHEI MAURI ORA Tuia te whakapono Tuia te tumanako Tuia te aroha Tuia te hunga ora Ki te hunga ora Tihei Mauri ora Ka nui te mihi ki a koutou Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa. Thank you, Hilary and thank you, Chris, and everyone at TIA for this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Support, recovery and re-set plan for tourism communities
    Five South Island tourist communities targeted for specialist support Pressure on Māori tourism operators and Conservation facilities recognised Domestic and international-facing tourism agencies put on more secure footing Long-term plan to re-set tourism with a focus on sustainability, industry standards and regional economic diversification A plan to ensure the immediate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech on NZ Rail Plan
    Check against delivery E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karanga maha o te wa, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa. Ki ngā mana whenua o Taranaki Whānui anō nei aku mihi ki a koutou. Nōku te hōnore kia haere mai ki te whakanuia tēnei huihuinga whakahirahira. Nō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government hits massive milestone in Violence Prevention & Elimination
    Minister for Family and Sexual Violence Marama Davidson announced a major milestone at a hui in South Auckland today, with the launch of the national engagement process on the prevention and elimination of family and sexual violence. “There is no room for violence in our lives – there is no ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Fee waiver extended for conservation tourism businesses
    Tourism businesses operating on public conservation land will have another six months of fees waived to help them adjust to the downturn in international visitors in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Acting Minister of Conservation Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced. "We acknowledge it has been a difficult year for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • ‘Lua Wave’ to future-proof Pasifika Festivals in Aotearoa
    Pasifika festival organisers will receive additional support to adapt to the COVID-19 environment thanks to the Government’s newly launched ‘Lua Wave’ component of the Pasifika Festivals Initiative, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “This initiative has not only been to support festival organisers to recover from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Crown accounts show confidence in Govt economic plan
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect the resilience of the economy and confidence in the Government’s economic recovery plan. The Crown accounts for the nine months to the end of March 2021 show both OBEGAL and the operating balance remain better than forecast in the Half Year Economic and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Energy Trusts of NZ Autumn Conference
    It’s a pleasure to be here today. Thank you Karen [Sherry] for the introduction and thanks to the Energy Trusts Executive for inviting me to speak at tonight’s event. It is an exciting time to come to speak to trustees of distribution companies. For many decades the electricity industry was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New partnership to grow Māori success in STEM
    A new partnership with the Pūhoro STEM Academy will support thousands more rangatahi Māori to participate and succeed in the fields of science, technology, and innovation, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. Since 2016, Pūhoro has worked with Māori students to build their capability and create pathways to employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rail builds platform for economic recovery
    Transport Minister Michael Wood and State-Owned Enterprises Minister Dr David Clark today released the Government’s long term vision for a sustainable rail network that supports our economic recovery. New Zealand Rail Plan lays out how the Government is building a resilient, reliable and safe network, as well as the indicative ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • NZ and UK agree to lift the pace of free trade talks
    New Zealand and the United Kingdom have agreed to rapidly lift the tempo of talks, as the two countries enter a new phase in free trade negotiations, Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “UK Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss, and I spoke today about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill passes first reading
    The Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill has passed its first reading and will now be considered by Parliament’s Justice select committee. “The Bill updates and improves New Zealand’s counter-terrorism legislation and ensures that the right legislative tools are available to intervene early and prevent harm,” Minister of Justice Kris Faafoi said. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Statement on The Speaker and Annual Review Debate
    “The serious issue of alleged sexual assault and harassment at Parliament was poorly managed and inappropriately politicised last night. The tone of the debate did not reflect well on Parliament as a whole,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said. “Any investigation of claims of sexual assault should be in a manner ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Govt motoring towards zero-carbon buses and protecting drivers’ conditions
    Transport Minister Michael Wood is seeking feedback on options for the next phase of the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM) review to better protect bus drivers’ pay conditions, and also achieving the Government’s target of fully decarbonising the public transport bus fleet by 2035. Michael Wood said investing in our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Drop in unemployment shows Govt economic plan is working
    The Government’s economic recovery plan continues to be reflected in the labour market, with more people in work and unemployment falling. Stats NZ figures show employment rose by 15,000 in the March quarter, with 14,000 more women in work. The unemployment rate fell from 4.9 percent to 4.7 percent. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government sets pay and workforce expectations for the Public Sector
    The Government’s Workforce Policy Statement issued today sets out its expectations for pay and employment relations in the Public Sector, the Minister of Finance and Minister for the Public Service say. “New Zealand has had an exceptionally successful health and economic response to COVID-19. This has been supported by the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Author Ben Brown is New Zealand’s first Te Awhi Rito Reading Ambassador
    Lyttleton writer Ben Brown (Ngāti Mahuta, Ngāti Koroki, Ngāti Paoa) will be New Zealand’s first Te Awhi Rito Reading Ambassador, promoting the value of reading for children and young people, Internal Affairs Minister Jan Tinetti announced today. A poet and award-winning author, Ben Brown writes books, non-fiction and short stories ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Celebrating New Zealand’s firefighters this International Firefighters’ day
    With two fire stations already complete, and building underway on 16 fire stations around the country, today we celebrate International Firefighters’ Day for the important role firefighters have in keeping communities across the country safe, says Minister of Internal Affairs, Jan Tinetti. The work is progressing due to Government funding ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Ron Brierley knighthood to go
    Ron Brierley has written to the Clerk of the Executive Council to tender his resignation as a Knight Bachelor. The Queen has been informed. The forfeiture follows the Prime Minister initiating the process to remove his Knighthood. The Clerk of the Executive Council wrote to him on 6 April 2021 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Employment boost for rural communities
    The Government is continuing to create opportunities for at-risk rangatahi overcome barriers to employment, education or training with the next tranche of He Poutama Rangatahi programmes, Minister for Social Development and Employment Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “We’re focused on supporting rangatahi to get what they need to progress in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to Wellington Chamber of Commerce
    Thank you for the invitation to speak today, it is great to be here.  I mean that both sincerely and literally. For this equivalent speech last year I took part virtually, beaming in from the Beehive Theatrette with only a socially distanced press gallery bearing silent witness. You are a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Budget 2021 reprioritises nearly $1 billion
    The Government’s strong pandemic response and the better than expected economic recovery means not all the money allocated in the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund has been spent, Grant Robertson said in his annual pre-Budget speech to the Wellington Chamber of Commerce this morning. “As part of Budget preparation I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech on Digital Identity Trust Framework
    I'd like to start by thanking Graeme, David and Ben from NZTech and Digital Identity New Zealand for inviting me to speak to you. I’m so sorry I can’t be there in person, but I want to acknowledge those of you who are, including some of this country’s top tech ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • NZ Cook Islands travel bubble significant step in COVID-19 recovery
    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Cook Islands Prime Minister Mark Brown have today announced that, pending final confirmation by New Zealand’s Director-General of Health and the Cook Islands Secretary of Health, two-way quarantine-free travel will commence between the two countries on 17 May (NZT). “Two way quarantine-free travel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Minister for State Owned Enterprises saddened by passing of KiwiRail Chair
    Minister for State Owned Enterprises, David Clark is deeply saddened to hear about the passing of KiwiRail Chairman, Brian Corban. “I know Brian was seen as a transformative leader within KiwiRail, well respected for his wisdom, honesty and sense of humour,” said David Clark. Mr Corban served as Chair of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to the China Business Summit by the Minister for Trade and Export Growth
      Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen.  Tena koutou katoa.  Good morning. It is my pleasure to join you today for this China Business Summit – my first as Minister for Trade and Export Growth as well as Minister of Agriculture – and to have the opportunity to speak to you ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago