web analytics

No one owns water, apart from corporations who sell it …

Written By: - Date published: 12:43 pm, May 22nd, 2017 - 27 comments
Categories: business, Conservation, Environment, exports, farming, water - Tags:

Water is an issue that has been hurting this Government.  From its expansion of dairying and the destruction of so many of our waterways, to the use of the fast forward fund to provide extra irrigation for Canterbury farmers, to the financial support supplied by water exporting companies such as Oravida to the National Party, to the strange support offered to the Ruataniwha Dam, to water quality problems in Havlock North as well as other areas, and to the refusal to countenance Maori’s very reasonable claim that water is a Taonga under article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi, to the sleight of hand about what “swimable” means, a lot has been happening.

And there have been some doozie examples of indifferent decision making.  Allowing a water exporting company to extract water from a Unesco World Heritage site and lay a pipeline through DOC area which is a sanctuary for New Zealand’s rarest kiwi and potentially forcing their removal takes a lot of chutzpah.

I suspect the water pricing issue is starting to really show up in the Government’s polling.  The Government thinks that the issue is too hard to solve.  Clearly this is in deference to the views of its farmer supporters who refuse to accept they should pay for water even though there are very strong policy and environmental reasons why this should occur.

But the Herald this morning has provided analysis suggesting that the Government’s approach and pro business attitude means that foreign corporations are paying peanuts for our water and then making huge profits.

From the Herald:

Water bottling companies are paying an average 500 times less than ratepayers for each litre of water they’re allowed to use.

A Herald investigation into water fees set by every regional council around the country found bottlers were charged an average $0.003 – or one third of a cent – per cubic metre of water.

Comparatively, in Auckland, Watercare charges $1.40 per cubic metre (1000 litres) for water piped to houses, while the rest of the country paid an average $1.60 per cubic metre.

“Water companies are getting the same water but paying bugger all for it,” said water campaigner Jen Branje from the Bung the Bore group.
“Why are ratepayers paying for something that corporates are getting almost for free? It’s an unfair equation.”

The approach of Councils is clearly in line with the Government view on water.

The Herald requested consent details from each regional council following nationwide protests in March.

It asked how much water it had allocated to bottling companies, and what annual fees they paid.

The results showed in total, 23 billion litres per year had been allocated for bottling. Not all consents were active or fully in-use.

Water bottlers paid an average $200 per year in fees to council for duties such as consent monitoring or administration.

Because water is considered a public good in New Zealand, councils cannot charge for the water itself, although many of their fees were calculated from volume amounts.

And the amounts are significant:

The amount of water allocated also varied widely- some users were granted 7 million litres per year, while others such as Okuru Enterprises on the West Coast were granted upwards of 900 million litres annually.

Public information showed the average bottling company in New Zealand had a turnover of $1.5 million per year – excluding beverage giants Coca Cola Amatil and Frucor – which both have turnover of around $500 million a year.

Last year, 27 million litres of water were exported to countries including the United States, Germany, Japan and Australia. Water exports are valued at 80c per litre, with a total export value for 2016 of $21.5 million, according to Statistics New Zealand.

The case for charging for the use of water, at least for corporations that make a profit for it, just became stronger.

The Green Party are opposed:

Right now companies can use huge amounts of our water for next to nothing, and make money out of it.

That’s not fair – water is precious, and many of our rivers and aquifers are being polluted and are under stress.

Bill English has tried to dampen public outrage by getting an advisory group to look at it. But he won’t commit to doing anything despite knowing we need to act now.

The Green Party says that if they’re taking it, and they’re profiting from it, they should pay for it!

And they are running a petition which if you want to sign is here.

27 comments on “No one owns water, apart from corporations who sell it …”

  1. Nick 1

    Petition signed. Cheers Greens

  2. McFlock 2

    “sleight of hand”. Not “sleigh” 🙂

    But I also quite liked the Greens intentional pun / freudian slip: “Bill English has tried to dampen public outrage ” (my emphasis)…

    Language trivialities aside, damned right water is a pushbutton issue. And will only get worse for the nats. Serves the bastards right, too.

    [Oops now fixed – MS]

  3. Ad 3

    Here’s the shareholders of Okuru Enterprises:

    http://bestbusinessnz.com/company/493056/okuru-enterprises-limited

    I think government should support this kind of local business.
    If they are paying for it I don’t care if it’s Coca Cola either.

    All in favour of corporations and farmers paying a commercial rate for their water.

    BUT.
    Make sure you think about what happens next.
    If regional council are allowed to set a commercial rate for water – i.e. make more $$ in the price than simply paying for the cost of capital and operations and depreciation, then you have given Council license to print money – just as much as the corporations.

    If regional councils are selling water at a commercial rate, then they are metering it. Businesses would then rightly point out that if they are paying for it, then so should every citizen. That would mean water meters in every town, alongside every letterbox.
    That’s quite a big political step.

    Don’t even mention nationwide fluoridation.

    If regional or local councils were selling water – even with a little fee – they would be liable for the quality of the product. We have had that rehearsed in Havelock North recently. That effective liability would mean harder and stronger enforcement of the National Water Standards. These I understand now come under the Ministry of Health (correct me, do). That’s a consumer lightning rod few politicians and even fewer Council staff would want to hold.

    I haven’t heard any party mention the equivalent of an Electricity Commission for water. There, the electricity price is set – in significant measure – by the cost of capital. It is a fully regulated industry. Same for airports, where aircraft landing charges are limited to the provable cost of capital from the airports. Really, really hard to contest.

    Who sets the price?
    Should there be regional variation?
    Who controls quality?
    Who is the beneficiary of that price?
    Should there be domestic v commercial price variation, and why?

    I want to hear the whole policy framework from those who really want this.

    At the moment the National government doesn’t have to answer any of these questions – which is of course to their advantage.

    • Draco T Bastard 3.1

      If regional council are allowed to set a commercial rate for water – i.e. make more $$ in the price than simply paying for the cost of capital and operations and depreciation, then you have given Council license to print money – just as much as the corporations.

      Councils, just like central government, should be printing money.

      That would mean water meters in every town, alongside every letterbox.

      They should be there anyway as we actually do need to know how much is being used and where. They can also help find leaks.

      Who sets the price?

      The market.

      Of course, the local council should determine, through the scientific method, just how much water is available.

      Should there be regional variation?

      Nope, there should only price.

      Who controls quality?

      That would depend upon if quality control is needed wouldn’t it?

      Should there be domestic v commercial price variation, and why?

      No but people should be guaranteed access to water while the corporations aren’t.

      • Ad 3.1.1

        Councils are never going to “print money”, so forget that as a possibility. Not even helpful.

        Re metering: plenty of Councils have been thrown out for proposing it. It’s a major democratic problem. Not everyone accepts that “user pays” is appropriate for what is an essential human right.

        The market should not set the price for something that no-one can live without.
        And before anyone says “rainwater tanks”, 90% of New Zealand lives in cities, and they are not practical for them other than for an elite few who choose them, live with the quality risks, and can afford the capital to buy and upkeep them.

        Why should there not be price variation? Why should a West Coaster or their business pay the same where it is abundant, compared to the Hawkes Bay or Canterbury Plains where it is scarce? It’s reasonable to respond to catchment capacity, as Regional Councils already do.

        Quality control is a requirement through the national water standards. Which are legally binding upon all suppliers and regulators of potable water.

        As for “people should be guaranteed access to water while corporations aren’t” … well, most Councils now have water corporations, who sell and process water for both domestic and commercial use. No one regulates them.

        • dukeofurl 3.1.1.1

          Well the regulation is that the water supply isnt able to make a profit.

        • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1.2

          Re metering: plenty of Councils have been thrown out for proposing it. It’s a major democratic problem. Not everyone accepts that “user pays” is appropriate for what is an essential human right.

          Poor education and limited logic. Metering is essential even without user pays.

          Quality control is a requirement through the national water standards. Which are legally binding upon all suppliers and regulators of potable water.

          But not all water supplied needs to be potable but does still need to be charged for.

          As for “people should be guaranteed access to water while corporations aren’t” … well, most Councils now have water corporations, who sell and process water for both domestic and commercial use. No one regulates them.

          Then those ‘corporations’ need to be changed to public services which is really what they are.

          • Ad 3.1.1.2.1

            – compulsory nationwide metering to all NZ catchments and users is very impractical outside urban areas. It’s not impossible. It would take a decade, and need water-specific legislation. Compare rollout of telephones, electricity, and broadband. About a decade each.

            – all water supplied from public sources is subject to regulation for quality. You will have major consumer guarantee problems and health problems if raw water sold for industrial use is sold for other purposes. Would need explicit liability and insurance clauses.

            – further legislation would be required to banish public water companies. Recall what happened to council-owned retail electricity companies? They werent bought in house.

            For all of the above, there are massive policy holes. Its a lovely little petition, but needs actual thinking.

            • Graeme 3.1.1.2.1.1

              “– compulsory nationwide metering to all NZ catchments and users is very impractical outside urban areas. It’s not impossible. It would take a decade, and need water-specific legislation. Compare rollout of telephones, electricity, and broadband. About a decade each.”

              It’s already compulsory and happening. All water takes over 5 l/s have to be metered and reported to Regional Councils, preferably in pretty much real time. It happens under the Resource Management (Measurement and Reporting of Water Takes) Regulations 2010

              Click to access Resource%20Management_Measurement_and_Reporting_of%20Water%20Takes%20Regulations%202010.pdf

              It caused a bit of angst, and cost, but for larger takes over 20 l/s has been happening since 2012.

  4. greywarshark 4

    Watch the gummint try to pour cold water on that.

  5. Draco T Bastard 5

    Here’s the authors Twitter story on how hard it was to get the info from the councils.

  6. Molly 6

    “Businesses would then rightly point out that if they are paying for it, then so should every citizen. “
    And that is when it should be pointed out to them that they are not actually a living organism that requires clean water to live. They can change their business model or strategy and make money elsewhere.

    • greywarshark 6.1

      Molly
      The trouble is that sometime in the 1990s I think the laws were changed to give companies and corporations the same rights as citizens. Which wiped any special privileges we might have as living individuals right away. The lawyers that write here may like to confirm that and demonstrate with an example what it means and how we are disadvantaged by this.

  7. dukeofurl 7

    “Comparatively, in Auckland, Watercare charges $1.40 per cubic metre (1000 litres) for water piped to houses, while the rest of the country paid an average $1.60 per cubic metre.”

    Watercare charges for both the treated water supply and its disposal as sewage treatment , including all the dams , plants, pipes to do so.

    This comparison has to be one of the stupidest things to ever come out of the Herald.

    There is plenty to be said for having a higher price for those bottling water from their own bore.
    But comparing the amount for treated supply and disposal with that for a bore drilled by the bottler on their own land ( most cases) is absurd.

    Would you compare restaurant prices with the price of raw ingredients at a supermarket ?

    • dukeofurl 7.1

      The charge by Watercare for sewage treatment is in addition, so the effective charge per m3 , as read by meter, is $ 3.37 m3

    • re 7.2

      dol is touching on a very good point. The comparison in the OP is a great emotive button pusher, but doesn’t stand much scrutiny.

      The huge fraction of municipal water supply are fixed costs for bulk water treatment and distribution direct to homes. A typical city supplies between 200 – 400 litre/person/day all treated to a high drinking water standard, yet only a tiny fraction (<1%) is actually directly consumed by humans. The ratio of fixed capital costs to the marginal cost of delivering each litre of water is enormous.

      Bottled water has a completely different economic model. If taken from a clean aquifer source the treatment and supply capital costs are very low, while the transport and distribution costs are directly related to marginal cost of each litre sold. Of which almost all is actually directly consumed as drinking water. In this case the marginal costs of supply completely dominate the picture.

      Or put it this way, how would you feel if your local council started charging you bottled water prices for each of the 300 litres of water each person in your household uses per day?

    • RedLogix 7.3

      dol is touching on a very good point. The comparison in the OP is a great emotive button pusher, but doesn’t stand much scrutiny.

      The huge fraction of municipal water supply are fixed costs for bulk water treatment and distribution direct to homes. A typical city supplies between 200 – 400 litre/person/day all treated to a high drinking water standard, yet only a tiny fraction (<1%) is actually directly consumed by humans. The ratio of fixed capital costs to the marginal cost of delivering each litre of water is enormous.

      Bottled water has a completely different economic model. If taken from a clean aquifer source the treatment and supply capital costs are very low, while the transport and distribution costs are directly related to marginal cost of each litre sold. Of which almost all is actually directly consumed as drinking water. In this case the marginal costs of supply completely dominate the picture.

      Or put it this way, how would you feel if your local council started charging you bottled water prices for each of the 300 litres of water each person in your household uses per day?

  8. Ethica 8

    This is such an important issue. Our best and deepest water is literarily being syphoned off by overseas corporates and we get nothing except the contaminated left over shallow water. There are huge water factories spouting up all over the country. This must become an election issue. The water industry should be nationalised.

  9. Mat Simpson 9

    All signed Mickey.

    The water issue has the potential to damage this government.

    This grab of a natural resource for free and the profit being made from its sale while joe the public has to pay twice , once for supply and again to purchase it bottled is a perfect example of why the current government should fall at the next election.

    Third term governments always have sleeper issues that provoke strong feelings like how much water you can have while you are in the shower and the ” ditch the bitch ” protest by truckies at the increase in road user charges in Labour’s last months in government.
    https://www.nbr.co.nz/article/clark-defends-rise-road-user-charges-32799

    The water issue though is inherently unfair and the impact on the environment and supply into the future must be addressed.

    But there will be no action before September 23rd with a glib response to be seen to be doing something while doing absolutely nothing.

  10. Ian 10

    If you think that selling bottled water is such a money spinner why don’t you all put your money where your mouth is. Then you could give your profits to the poor and first home buyers.
    You would then solve the housing crisis and the poverty dilemma with a wave of your magic wand.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 10.1

      Nah, I’ll leave the primary extraction industries to lazy bitter dullards like you and get on with something worthwhile and productive instead thanks,

      • Ian 10.1.1

        So how do you contribute to the New Zealand economy nameless one ?

        • One Anonymous Bloke 10.1.1.1

          You think your handle is any more anonymous than mine? Logic fail.

          I contribute to the economy via private enterprise, and I value my privacy.

  11. greg 11

    no one has manged to answer why the fuck are we giving a public resource away for nothing is this government so corrupt or they just total morons for goodness sake royalties should be paid and plunder should be tightly regulated does Saudi Arabia give away its oil no fucken way.
    >

  12. JC 12

    “If the Minister of Conservation grants a concession to electricity company, Westpower, to build a Hydro scheme on the Waitaha River – as she says she intends to do – Mogan George will become an emanciated trickle for much of the year, Opponents say this would be an environmental tragedy and a cultural loss, and tantamount to building a wind farm on the summit of Aoraki/Mt Cook”

    https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/a-tale-of-two-currents/

    WTF! Still this goes on!, (And On) No decision yet…..

  13. Jeremy 13

    I think some info might be missing.

    Are the bottling companies buying water after it has gone through distribution and treatment infrastructure, or they sourcing the water directly from source?

    If it’s the latter, as I would suspect, it would explain much of the discrepancy.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Government announces plan to tackle problem plastics and seven single-use plastic items
    Following the success of the phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags, the Government now has plans to phase out more single-use and problem plastics to reduce waste and protect the environment announced Associate Minister for the Environment Eugenie Sage. The proposals are to phase-out: some hard-to-recycle PVC and polystyrene ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • PM comments on Auckland COVID-19 case
    After 102 days we have our first cases of Covid-19 outside of a Managed Isolation or Quarantine facility in New Zealand. Shortly I will ask Dr Bloomfield to set out the details of the case. While we have all worked incredibly hard to prevent this scenario, we have also planned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Significant investment in Raukūmara Pae Maunga to prevent Raukūmara forest collapse
    An iwi-Crown approach programme to restore the Raukūmara forest on the East Coast of the North Island and boost employment opportunities for whānau, particularly rangatahi/young people, will receive $34 million funding, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has announced. “Raukūmara Pae Maunga is a partnership with Te Whānau-ā-Apanui, Ngāti Porou, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New partnership central to delivering more Māori housing
    Government agencies and partners are working closer together to provide more Māori Housing through the Te MAIHI o te Whare Māori – the Māori and Iwi Housing Innovation Framework for Action (MAIHI). MAIHI is a kaupapa Māori approach that drives a system change to give effect and impact on Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Manawatū Gorge replacement highway drives forward
    Site work is soon to begin on Te Ahu a Turanga: Manawatū Tararua Highway, the project to replace the former SH3 route through the Manawatū Gorge, Transport Minister Phil Twyford said today. Phil Twyford was today in Woodville at the signing of a formal agreement by members of the Alliance ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Pacific Ministers meet to discuss regional economic priorities
    The Pacific Islands Forum Economic Ministers Meeting (FEMM) begins today and will focus on the major economic and social impacts of COVID-19 on the Pacific.  FEMM is an important congregation of Economic Ministers and senior officials from around the region, and for the first time, the annual meeting will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Formal apology and payment to George Nepata
    Cabinet has approved a formal apology and ex gratia payment to former soldier George Nepata, announced Defence Minister Ron Mark. This payment is to recognise the New Zealand Defence Force’s failure to provide Mr Nepata with a safe system of work in April 1989 when, as a result of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Report into Iain Lees-Galloway’s expenditure
    A report undertaken by Ministerial Services into Iain Lees-Galloway’s ministerial expenditure has found no evidence of any inappropriate transactions or spending. Ministerial Services undertook a line by line review of all his expenditure, including staff and spouse expenses for the period 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020.  “I commissioned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Managed isolation charges to start 11 August
    Managed isolation charges for returnees will come into force from 12.01am Tuesday 11th August, after they passed their last cabinet milestone today, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. “The new charging system balances the rights of New Zealanders to return home and helps reduce pressure on the managed isolation and quarantine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Update on New Zealand and the Cook Islands travel bubble
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Henry Puna have welcomed the completion of phase one in the establishment of a travel bubble between New Zealand and the Cook Island. Negotiations on the text of an ‘Arrangement to Facilitate Quarantine-Free Travel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • One-stop ‘jobs and training’ shop goes live
    The Government has launched a new online, phone and onsite service to help New Zealanders connect to a range of employment support and products for workers and businesses affected by COVID-19, announced Minister of Education Chris Hipkins and Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni. Connected.govt.nz is a one-stop-shop for jobseekers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • MSD security guards to be paid Living Wage
    Security guards contracted to the Ministry of Social Development will be paid at least the Living Wage from next month supporting the Government’s commitment towards fair pay and employment conditions, announced Minister for  Social Development Carmel Sepuloni.   “MSD was  among the first government agencies to pay its employees the living ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New strategy to ensure nature thrives
    The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today launched Te Mana o te Taiao, the Aotearoa New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy - a way forward that envisions Aotearoa New Zealand as a place where ecosystems are healthy and resilient, and people embrace the natural world. “Many of New Zealand’s plants and wildlife species ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Provider Languages Fund will support Pacific Wellbeing approach
    “Pacific languages, cultures and identity are essential to the health, wellbeing and lifetime success of our Pacific peoples and their communities in Aotearoa. The strength and resilience of Pacific Aotearoa is not only vital to their own prosperity but integral to the prosperity of all New Zealanders, and is particularly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • COVID-19: More funding for schools and boost to construction sector
    ·       $38 million to help schools cover unexpected costs related to COVID-19 ·       $69 million upgrade for online learning ·       $107 million contingency funding to support school construction suppliers facing additional costs due to the lockdown. The Government is releasing $214 million from the COVID-19 response and recovery fund to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Stay safe on the tracks – Rail Safety Week
    Despite the Government installing safety upgrades around the country, people should still take care around rail crossings, said Transport Minister Phil Twyford launching Rail Safety Week. Phil Twyford said installing safety infrastructure is crucial, but we are encouraging people to be more careful around trains too. “We’re making good progress ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government backs Manawatū social housing project
    The Government is providing a cash injection to help Palmerston North City Council complete a programme to provide 78 social housing units for vulnerable tenants. The $4.7 million to build 28 units in the Papaioea Place redevelopment comes from the $3 billion set aside for infrastructure in the Government’s COVID-19 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Major funding boost for Predator Free Banks Peninsula
    A pest free Banks Peninsula/Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū is one step closer with a $5.11 million boost to accelerate this project and create jobs, announced Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage in Canterbury today. “This is a game changer for this ambitious project to restore the native wildlife and plants on Ōtautahi/Christchurch’s doorstep ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Major investment for indoor sports in Hawke’s Bay
    A Government grant of $6.4 million will expand the Pettigrew Arena in Taradale with new indoor courts of national standard. “The project is likely to take 18 months with approximately 300 people employed through the process,” Grant Robertson said. “The expansion will increase the indoor court space up to 11 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New infrastructure for Far North tourist town
    The Far North tourist destination of Mangonui is to receive Government funding to improve waterfront infrastructure, open up access to the harbour and improve water quality, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has announced. A total of $6.5 million from the $3 billion set aside in the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government remains committed to Women’s Cricket World Cup
    The Government has re-affirmed its commitment to supporting the hosting of the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup, which the ICC has delayed from 2021 to 2022. “This is obviously a disappointing decision for cricket players and fans around the world and for the White Ferns and their supporters here at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Green light for Te Awa River Ride in $220m nationwide cycleways investment
    Cyclists and walkers will now have a safer way to get around Taupō, Tūrangi, and between Hamilton and Cambridge, with funding for shared paths and Te Awa River Ride, Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. “The Te Awa River Ride is the latest part of massive growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Six major ‘shovel-ready’ cycleways funded in Christchurch
    Six major cycle routes will be completed in Christchurch thanks to funding from the Government’s investment in shovel-ready infrastructure as part of the COVID-19 recovery Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. $125 million will be invested to kick-start construction and fund the completion of the following cycleway ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Police facilities for Whanganui
    Plans are underway for a brand new state-of-the-art hub for Whanganui’s justice and social agencies, following confirmation the ageing Whanganui Central Police Station is to be replaced. Police Minister Stuart Nash has announced $25 million in new infrastructure spending to improve facilities for the wider community, and for staff who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Relativity adjustment for Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu
    An adjustment payment has been made to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu under the relativity mechanisms in their 1995 and 1997 Treaty of Waitangi settlements, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced today. The latest payments to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu are $2,700,000 and $2,600,000 respectively to ensure the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Auckland rail upgrades pick up steam
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off the start of the Auckland NZ Upgrade Programme rail projects which will support over 400 jobs and help unlock our biggest city. Both ministers marked the start of enabling works on the third main rail line project ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • PGF support for Wairoa creates jobs
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment of $3.78 million in Wairoa will create much needed economic stimulus and jobs, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. PGF projects announced today include: $200,000 loan to Nuhaka Kiwifruit Holdings Ltd (operated by Pine Valley Orchard Ltd) to increase the productivity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Public and Māori housing to trial renewable energy technology
    Tenants in public and Māori housing may be benefiting from their own affordable renewable energy in future – a fund to trial renewable energy technology for public and Māori housing has today been announced by Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods and Associate Minister for Housing (Māori Housing) Nanaia Mahuta. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • $2.7m for Hokianga infrastructure
    Hokianga will receive $2.7 million to redevelop four of its wharves and upgrade its water supply, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. Far North District Council will receive $1.8 million from the Provincial Growth Fund for the work on the wharves. “The work will include the construction of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New fund to support housing and construction sector
    A $350 million Residential Development Response Fund is being established to support the residential construction sector and to minimise the economic impact from COVID-19, the Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods has announced. “The Residential Development Response Fund will help to progress stalled or at-risk developments that support our broader housing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government investment to boost Auckland’s community recycling network
    As part of a broader plan to divert waste from landfill, the Government today announced $10.67 million for new infrastructure as part of the Resource Recovery Network across the Auckland region. “This key investment in Auckland’s community recycling network is part of the Government’s Infrastructure Reference Group ‘shovel ready’ projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Te Papa transformation starts at Cameron Road
    The Government is investing $45 million in the first stage of an ambitious urban development project for Tauranga that will employ up to 250 people and help the region grow, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Phil Twyford says the funding has been allocated out of the $3 billion ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Low-emissions options for heavy transport a step closer
    Getting low-emission trucks on the road is a step closer with investment in infrastructure to support hydrogen vehicles, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. The Infrastructure Reference Group has provisionally approved $20 million for New Plymouth company Hiringa Energy to establish a nationwide network of hydrogen-fuelling stations. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New training centre to upskill workers
    A new trades training centre to upskill the local workforce will be built in the South Waikato town of Tokoroa through funding from the Government’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, Education Minister Chris Hipkins and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Government will contribute $10.84 million from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Subsequent children legislation to change
    The Government has agreed to repeal part of the Oranga Tamariki Act subsequent children provisions, Minister for Children Tracey Martin announced today. “There are times when children need to go into care for their safety – the safety and care of children must always be paramount,” Minister Martin said. “But ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Funding to expand mental health support for Pacific peoples
    A $1.5 million boost to grow primary mental health and addiction services for Pacific peoples in Auckland, Hamilton and Canterbury will lead to better outcomes for Pacific communities, Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa says.  Pasifika Futures has received funding to expand services through The Fono, Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Funding boost for sustainable food and fibre production
    Twenty-two projects to boost the sustainability and climate resilience of New Zealand’s food and fibres sector have been announced today by Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. The $18m funding will deliver practical knowledge to help farmers and growers use their land more sustainably, meet environmental targets, remain prosperous, and better understand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Mature Workers Toolkit launched on business.govt.nz
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson welcomes an initiative that assists employers to get mature workers into New Zealand small businesses. The disadvantages that older people face in the workplace was highlighted in the whole of Government Employment Strategy.  In order to address this, a Mature Workers Toolkit has been developed and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Trans-Tasman cooperation in a COVID-19 world
    New Zealand and Australia reaffirmed today the need for the closest possible collaboration as they tackle a global environment shaped by COVID-19, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters said. “In these challenging times, our close collaboration with Australia is more vital than ever,” said Mr Peters. Mr Peters and his Australian ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Pike recovery efforts now in unexplored territory
    The recovery and forensic examination of the loader driven by survivor Russell Smith means the underground team are now moving into an area of the Pike River Mine that has not been seen since the explosion, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little said. “The fifth and last robot ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago