The drought

Written By: - Date published: 7:43 am, February 13th, 2015 - 37 comments
Categories: climate change, disaster, farming, farming - Tags: , ,

I spent some of Waitangi weekend cycling bits of the Otago Rail Trail. Everything was parched and brown (29 degrees – why is it always uphill in to a head wind?). Locals are calling it The Big Dry.

Now the official drought has been declared, and farmers are saying “We haven’t seen these conditions before”. Farmers now have access to support through extra funding for rural support trusts.

I’m glad that we live in a country that has a welfare system to support those in need, as some farmers currently are. Wouldn’t it be nice if all welfare recipients were treated with dignity and respect?

Weather extremes are going to be the new normal. Droughts in many areas will only get worse from here. High intensity irrigation to support dairy farming probably isn’t sustainable. Both farmers and the country as a whole need to be adapting to this new reality.

Farmers are the most vulnerable of any of us to the impact of climate change. They should be leading the charge on reducing carbon emissions, reducing pollution, and developing sustainable methods. Why aren’t they? Why is the party that has traditionally represented farmers such a disaster on these issues? It is madness.

37 comments on “The drought”

  1. tricledrown 1

    Because the farming sector knows it all they are extremely uncomprimising have their heads buried in the sand.unwilling to change.
    Thats not all farmers but the majority.
    Bringing in RCD was a very short sited idea.Sheep farming has been marginal since the 1950s with ocasional interludes.
    China wanted over a billion rabbits a year from us now they don’t want any.
    Dairy farming has expanded at an exponential rate,an unsustainable rate.
    Drought is going to bankrupt many because milk prices are down production is down debts aren’t going away.
    Laissez Faire it’ll be right mate attitudes,I am astounded at the levels of debt in th Dairy industry how the Banks have been happy to lend huge sums in a cyclical commodity industry.
    I would class that as predatry loan practice.These Bankers will be the first to foreclose when indebted farmers can’t meet their obligations.
    But they were happy to sign up the loans.
    The Canterbury plains aren’t suitable for large scale Dairying but are for cropping.
    Nick Smiths undoing of Ecan had allowed unfetered expansion of Dairying which has caused huge enviromental damage.
    There isn’t enough water in Canterbury to maitain the numbers of Cows yet National have allowed this disaster to happen!
    Cows are being neglected and abused now because their isn’t enough food or Water,Sporidiums are spreading because cows are being forced to stay on smaller irrigated blocks so aren’t being rotated of paddocks to allow sporidiums to die off.
    Its factoru farming out of control.

    • Kevin 1.1

      Of course the banks are happy to loan to dairy farmers as the land is going nowhere. And when they fail, the corporate farmers will be there, ready to pick up a bargain. It’s all about control of the resources.

  2. Sirenia 2

    Interesting to hear how drought-affected farmers will be treated when they go to a Work and Income office seeking help. Will they have a special desk to go to or will they have to go past two suspicious armed security guards, go into long queues, be turned away unless they have two or more specific pieces of identity and detailed information about their income, be denied help for counselling or other support, denied information about supplementary benefits, denied food grants, denied dignity and be treated as bludgers and scum?

    • David 2.1

      There are armed security guards at WINZ offices? Armed with bad attitudes and tacky body art maybe… The rest of your atatement I agree with though, that place is Hades these days.

  3. ianmac 3

    “They” of course will demand water storage as the answer. And this Government will stump up the millions to build dams in the High Country. Problems solved.

  4. vto 4

    Northern Hemisphere – Southern Hemisphere

    Over our recent history many plant and crop species from similar climates in the northern hemisphere have been brought down here very successfully. Grapes, olives, all the main grasses, the list is extensive…

    I understand that in France grapevines cannot be irrigated after their first 6 months in the ground. As such their roots go deep, very very deep like 10s of metres. This would certainly likely work in Canterbury where water tables are only a couple to a few metres down. Similarly olives and their desire for warmer and drier. These are two examples that have already worked successfully in east coast climes (though the irrigation needs to stop a-la France).

    Similarly taller tree species that have an economic value, with deeper rooting systems may work. And they would reverse that most significant of factors afflicting east coast now, namely deforestation and the consequent immediate drying of the land.

    Point being that imo these areas will go horticultural eventually. And horticulture has an intensity that feeds more people, supports more farmers and citizens per acre, etc. The northern hemisphere species have not yet been fully evaluated for their use in NZ. Then of course there are our native species which have lain dormant due to all eyes going elsewhere for too long. Kauri (we grow them in the south island with success that sees them as high as other fast-growing natives in the right place. Twice as long as pines to harvest but ten times the value – simple maths), flax, I dunno but there gotta be loads of them.

    Anyways just some brief thoughts arisen from too many years working, looking, thinking, day-dreaming on these matters in these here parts. Clearly the current model doesn’t work – I don’t think there is much credibility left in those promoting existing models – they are in their death throes and denial and that never lasts.

  5. Lanthanide 5

    “I’m glad that we live in a country that has a welfare system to support those in need, as some farmers currently are. Wouldn’t it be nice if all welfare recipients were treated with dignity and respect?”

    Supposedly these farmers are pretty much entitled to the unemployment benefit, but only if they effectively have no money to feed their families.

    Best not to make it sound like we’re doing anything really serious to help 99% of farmers.

    • weka 5.1

      +1

      I saw something recently from a farmer spokesperson, who said that support is only available to farmers in extreme situations (eg they can’t feed themselves). I’d like to see something on the actual facts about farmer welfare.

      Having said that, it came from a Fed Farmers bod, and he no doubt wants farming to continue doing the same old shit and not changing to sustainable practices.

    • Sirenia 5.2

      It is the level of evidence that is required to prove you have no money to feed their families that is the problem for many desperate people. I imagine that would be quite hard for farmers if they were required to provide the same detailed information as others are. I would just like a level playing field for farmers and others seeking benefit support – and then they might be some solidarity and empathy for those coping with never ending poverty.

  6. weka 6

    The issue isn’t lack of rainfall, it’s how the land is being farmed. If you want to farm in a very hot dry place then you have to adapt your practices to fit in with and take their cues from the local climate and soil, not adapt farming practices that were developed in rainy, cloudy England.

    The crucial issue is not so much how water falls on the land, but what happens to it once it does. In NZ, conventional farming uses practices that dry out the land. Instead we could be using practices that keep the water moving within the landscape instead of evaporating or running off. These practices are all used in drier climates than NZ. They can be used small scale or large scale, rural and urban.

    Here are a couple of examples,

    Swale animation, showing how water harvesting ditches on contour rehydrate the landscape and in some cases re-establish springs (1min38) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFeylOa_S4c

    Swale and hugelkultur, how to harvest water passively, and how to use buried carbon mass to hold water in the land (7mins) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ima_ff5xVH4

    The classic Greening the Desert slide show (5 mins), showing establishment of food production in the first year in Jordan which has the driest climate per head of population in the world, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sohI6vnWZmk

    John Liu’s documentary of restoring landscapes that are in the process of becoming deserts (this applies to much of the east of the South Island). 47 mins, but worth the watch for anyone that wants to understand what makes land sustainable. It also demonstrates how restoring land brings benefits to the people who live there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBLZmwlPa8A

    • stever 6.1

      I agree.

      But in fact the average annual rainfall in Canterbury is higher than in southern england. I think that overall England’s average is about the same as Canterbury’s, almost our driest region.

      http://www.currentresults.com/Weather/United-Kingdom/average-yearly-precipitation.php

      http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/map/19595/new-zealand-annual-rainfall

      So I’d echo your point…we have to stick to growing what that climate in Canterbury can support. Look at East Anglia in England…much lower rainfall than Canterbury, and they’ve learned to grow appropriately (though the mega-fields might have been a bad idea for wildlife….)

      • weka 6.1.1

        It’s not just about annual rainfall though. Cloud cover/sunshine hours effect evaporation. Length of time between rainfall matters, and in turn how much falls at a time. How dry is the air? How much wind is there? A significant aspect of Canterbury’s climate is the hot N/W. Longitudinal differences between NZ and the UK will mean NZ is hotter and therefore drier.

        Not sure what’s happening in East Anglia, but if they are using artificial inputs and relying on fossil fuels, then it’s not sustainable. They’ll get away with that for longer if they are farming better suited to climate, but it’s still going to be net loss to the environment over time.

    • Tiro 6.2

      John Liu’s documentary : Green Gold is indeed worth watching!
      I like some of the comments like:
      “the Source of Wealth is functioning ecosystems” and
      “We can not let ignorant people abuse the land”

    • b waghorn 6.3

      I don’t think you can us the Jordon model when discussing land degrading it looks from the john liu’s doco that they have basically over stocked and set stocked for thousands of years.
      They could learn a thing or to from kiwi dry stock farmers on subdivision and rotation to keep pastures healthy.

      • weka 6.3.1

        I think we’re just not as far down the path as the Loess Plateau in China, or as Jordan. And yet NZ farmers overstock and overgraze, and when drought hits they have to sell stock to survive. I think the main difference is that China (the Loess Plateau) had large numbers of people stock grazing for very long periods of time and eventually even rotating and other methods wouldn’t have been enough. Too much pressure on the land. And they didn’t have the mitigating effects of fossil fuels for most of that (eg irrigators).

        In NZ, we’ve had less time to do damage and more of that time has had the support of technology and artificial fertilisiers that themselves create problems but mask them in the short and med term. But we still have too much pressure on the land, and we have land that becomes marginal and then you have to stop grazing it. How is that any different? In other words, we’re on the same path. Can’t really argue that the east of the SI is going to be in better condition in 50 years time than it is now, even leaving CC aside. Or even 20 years. Unless we change.

        Every time I see a photo like that on the front page of the ODT today http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/332960/we-are-tough-times I think about the Loess Plateau. There is a reason that that man is standing in an almost desert, and it’s not the lack of rainfall.

        Compare that photo (enlarge it for full effect), to this one,

        http://milkwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/allansavory2.jpg

        “Holistically Managed ranch is on left, desertifying ranch is on right. This is in a climate with 200mm annual rainfall in South Africa”

        http://www.milkwood.net/2013/06/06/get-ready-were-presenting-allan-savory-in-august/

        That’s less rainfall than half the annual rainfall at Middlemarch (Strath Taieri). And still more than Middlemarch’s annual rainfal in this drought year which is 2/3 of normal.

        (all fairness to the Strath Taieri farmer who is only doing what he has been taught and advised by professional advisors).

        • b waghorn 6.3.1.1

          I looked at the that top photo you linked to and thought I could go into a patch of my farm and get the same picture ,I’m dry here but no drought it’s just February .

          • weka 6.3.1.1.1

            Have you had normal rainfalls in the past 6 months?

            I don’t know the Strath Taieri that well, but one of the ODT reports talked about a lot of wind. I’m guessing that this a significant part of the SI ‘drought’. Do you get that up your way?

            • b waghorn 6.3.1.1.1.1

              Weather here according to the locals can’t be trusted any more . up until 10 years ago Taumarunui was classed as summer safe I found records once on the net but Havn’t been able to relocate them that had our average at 120 mm a month through summer ,I’m in my third summer here this has been the best one of them rain wise and I’ve recorded 90mm since mid DEC .

  7. Ray 7

    Yes the farmers who apply have to line up with other citizens who require help
    Yes they need full documentation which is complicated by the fact that having just sold capital stock they appear to be rolling in it.
    And this means not many bother
    I see the ever generous Goverment has budgeted $120,000 to cover other drought expenses (doesn’t include benefits )

    It is worth remembering that there is nothing new about drought on the East Coast, there being evidense going back 500 years

  8. Poission 8

    Weather extremes are going to be the new normal. Droughts in many areas will only get worse from here

    How?

    Explain the mechanism,

  9. Ennui 9

    Why was it uphill and into the wind? Obviously you were going the wrong way.

    As to drought on good wet years the water and cash cups runneth over. On bad years both drain away. We are however always asked for more water regardless.

  10. Ennui 10

    You realise Rob if you went the other way the wind and slope would have done the same….only pain may come from exercise. I used to despise cycling into the Chch nor easter, a cruel and callous breeze.

    • r0b 10.1

      A comment worthy of your name Ennui! Ahh, cycling in Chch, used to do 6km to high school and 6km home again every day. Rain, frost, shine or heatwave…

      • grumpystilskin 10.1.1

        “Rain, frost, shine or heatwave…”
        All in one day if I remember correctly!

        I heard of the drought on RNZ this morning, couldn’t help but think FFS are you not expecting it, and you call yourself farmers, people of the land?
        It reminded me of gillard going on about rebuilding after the floods with words to the effect of “we will rebuild and control natures forces” , had to laugh at her stupidity.

  11. aerobubble 11

    In order to maximize wealth, the revolutionary conservatives mantra that is supposed to save us all, actually fuel unnecessary activities using up non-renewables, and created not only the pollution crisis that is cliate change, but removed the ability of soceiety to adapt, whther media mogals laughing at freaky greens, or money talking louder than anyone, ans removing democraic input to govt.

    why we are not adapting, wealth of the world is tied to destroying the planet duh.

  12. Jane 12

    Oh yes, sadly, droughts are a fact for our future.

    Many folks are saying that this fact is not true, but even N.A.S.A. confirmed that many areas of the world will be hit by massive droughts up to the end of this century.

    Areas like New Zealand, Asutralia, the U.S. and Africa will all be hit by massive droughts which will last (some of them) even a few decades, and a situation like this can lead even to serious agricultural issues that will harm the ecosystems in all these areas.

    http://www.alternative-energies.net/n-a-s-a-warns-with-major-droughts-in-the-u-s-if-the-pollution-continues/

  13. ropata 13

    ironic that canterbury and taieri plains were enormous marshlands until people came along and drained them.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Kiwis to take part in world’s biggest earthquake drill
    At 1.30pm tomorrow, hundreds of thousands of Kiwis will join about 65 million people around the globe in ShakeOut, the world’s biggest earthquake drill. The annual drill is to remind people of the right action to take during an earthquake which is to Drop, Cover, Hold, and to practise their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    35 mins ago
  • Rising wages and low inflation supporting Kiwis
    Kiwis are benefiting from higher wage growth and low inflation under the Coalition Government. Stats NZ data out today shows the rise in the cost of living remains low, as annual Consumers Price Index (CPI) inflation fell to 1.5% in September from 1.7% in June. “The low inflation comes as ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • NZ economy strong amid global headwinds
    New Zealand’s economic strength and resilience has been recognised in a major update on the state of the global economy. The IMF’s latest World Economic Outlook released overnight shows a reduced global growth forecast over the next two years as issues like the US-China trade war and Brexit take hold. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Keeping New Zealanders safer with better counter-terrorism laws
    Justice Minister Andrew Little has today introduced a new Bill to prevent terrorism and support the de-radicalisation of New Zealanders returning from overseas. The Terrorism Suppression (Control Orders) Bill gives the New Zealand Police the ability to apply to the High Court to impose control orders on New Zealanders who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Improved succession and dispute resolution core of Ture Whenua changes
    A Bill that proposes targeted changes to simplify the processes for Māori land owners when engaging with the Māori Land Court has had its First Reading today. “The approach taken by the Government is to ensure that the protection of Māori land remains a priority as we seek to improve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Speech to CTU Biennial Conference
    Let me first thank all the new unionists and members in the room. There is nothing more important to improving people’s working lives than people making the decision to care, to get on board and help, to take up the reins and get involved. Congratulations to you. You bring the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Minister ensures continued Whenuapai flight operations
    Minister of Defence Ron Mark has signed a certificate exempting the activity of engine testing at Whenuapai Airbase from the Resource Management Act 1991. The Act gives the Minister of Defence the power to exempt activities for the purposes of national security.  The certificate will mean the recent Environment Court ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • NZ joins Coalition of Finance Ministers for Climate Action
    Finance Minister Grant Robertson has announced New Zealand will join the Coalition of Finance Ministers for Climate Action while attending APEC meetings in Chile. The objective of the 39 member Coalition is to share information and promote action to tackle climate change. It was formed in April this year, in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • CTU speech – DPM
    Ladies and gentlemen, NZCTU President Richard Wagstaff, members of respective unions – thank you for the invitation to speak to you today. This might be preaching to the choir, but the importance of trade unions in New Zealand’s historical arch is difficult to understate. And it is my belief that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Police Association Annual Conference
    "Let’s start by acknowledging that it has been a huge year. " Police Association Annual Conference James Cook Grand Chancellor Hotel Wellington Nau mai, haere mai. Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, ka nui te mihi, ki a koutou katoa. President of the Police Association, Chris Cahill; Members of the Association and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand announces a further P-3 deployment in support of UN sanctions
    Minister of Foreign Affairs Winston Peters and Minister of Defence Ron Mark have announced the New Zealand Government’s decision to again deploy a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3K2 (P-3) maritime patrol aircraft to support the implementation of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions imposing sanctions against North Korea. New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand deeply concerned at developments in north-east Syria
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters says New Zealand continues to have serious concerns for peace and stability in north-east Syria. “Recent reports that hundreds of ISIS-affiliated families have fled from a camp are deeply concerning from a humanitarian and security perspective”, Mr Peters says. “While we acknowledge Turkey’s domestic security ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government on high alert for stink bugs
    Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor is warning travelling Kiwis to be vigilant as the high-season for the crop-eating brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is under way. “We’re on high alert to stop BMSB arriving in NZ. The high season runs until April 30 and we’ve strengthened our measures to stop stink ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Better protections for students in halls of residence
    The Government is moving swiftly to change the law to improve the welfare and pastoral care of students living in university halls of residence and other tertiary hostels. Cabinet has agreed to several changes, including creating a new mandatory Code of Practice that sets out the duty of pastoral care ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New trapping guide for community and expert trappers alike
    The Minister for Conservation Eugenie Sage has launched a new comprehensive trapping guide for community trappers to help them protect our native birds, plants and other wildlife, at Zealandia in Wellington today. ‘A practical guide to trapping’, has been developed by the Department of Conservation (DOC), and was launched during ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Widening Access to Contraceptives Welcomed
    Associate Health Minister Julie Anne Genter welcomes PHARMAC’s move to improve access to long-acting reversible contraception (LARCs). PHARMAC has today announced it will fund the full cost of Mirena and Jaydess for anyone seeking long term contraception, lifting previous restrictions on access to Mirena. “I welcome women having greater choices ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Major upgrade for Taranaki Base Hospital
    The Government has approved the next stage of a major redevelopment of Taranaki Base Hospital, which will deliver new and improved facilities for patients. Health Minister Dr David Clark has announced details of a $300 million dollar project to build a new East Wing at the New Plymouth hospital. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Extra support for rural families
    Extra funding will allow Rural Support Trusts to help farming families, says Minister for Rural Communities and Agriculture Damien O’Connor. “I know that rural families are worried about some of the challenges facing them, including the ongoing uncertainty created by the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak. “Those concerns sit alongside ongoing worries ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Howard Leaque Beekeeper programme graduation
    Thank you for the opportunity to be here to present certificates to the 16 graduates who have completed a beekeeping course delivered by the Howard League.  Let us start by acknowledging Auckland Prison’s Deputy Prison Director Tom Sherlock, and Acting Assistant Regional Commissioner of Corrections Northern Region Scott Walker - ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Finance Minister to attend APEC meetings
    Finance Minister Grant Robertson leaves this weekend to attend the APEC Finance Ministers meeting in Santiago, Chile. Discussions between APEC Finance Ministers at the meeting will include the effects of the current global economic uncertainty, risks for APEC economies and sustainable development of the region. While at APEC Grant Robertson ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pacific languages are a source of strength, they ground us and build confidence
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says for Pacific people, language can be a source of strength. It can help ground us and give us confidence. When we speak them, our languages provide us with an immediate and intimate access to our identity and our story - and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Major boost to support disabled people in sport and recreation
    The Coalition Government has announced an action plan to improve the wellbeing of disabled New Zealanders by addressing inequalities in play, active recreation and sport. The initiative includes training to develop a workforce that understands the needs of children and young people with a range of impairments, advocacy for fit ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More prefab homes to be built as red tape cut
    The construction sector is being freed up to allow more homes to be built more quickly as the Government cuts through some of the red tape of the Building Act.  “Every New Zealander deserves a warm, dry, safe home and old inefficiencies in the Building Act make building slow and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Further details of Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall visit to New Zealand
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has welcomed further details on the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall’s visit to New Zealand next month. Their Royal Highnesses will visit New Zealand from 17-23 November – their third joint visit to New Zealand and first in four years. They arrive in Auckland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • O’Connor in Thailand to push for RCEP deal
    Minister of State for Trade and Export Growth and Minister of Agriculture, Damien O’Connor, heads to Thailand today to attend the final Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) Ministerial meeting, as negotiations enter their final stages. “The RCEP Agreement would anchor New Zealand in a regional agreement that covers 16 countries, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Young Pacific people can access earning and learning opportunities in Hawke’s Bay, Otago and South...
    Pacific young people living in the Hawke’s Bay, Southland and Otago regions will have access to support services that have proved successful in helping young people find new earning and learning opportunities. “Tupu Aotearoa is about changing Pacific young peoples’ lives. Our young people are talented, they are smart, they ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Protecting wellbeing – ACC HQSC Trauma Forum
    Introduction As the Minister for ACC I thank you all for the work that you do supporting New Zealanders in their literally most vulnerable moments. From those who hold people’s lives in their hands, to the people who research technique, technology and trends, your work is highly valued. A special ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • NZ economy in good shape – notes prepared for speeches in Christchurch
    Notes prepared for speeches in Christchurch – Wednesday 9 October 2019 Today’s topic, “trends and opportunities for the New Zealand economy,” is certainly one getting a great deal of commentary at the moment. Looking across the media landscape lately you’ll notice we aren’t the only ones having this discussion. There ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • World Mental Health Day a reminder of the importance of mental health work
    Minister of Health Dr David Clark and Associate Minister of Health Peeni Henare say this year’s World Mental Health Day theme is a reminder of why the Government’s work on mental health is so important. “This year the World Federation for Mental Health has made suicide prevention the main theme ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Cultural Ministers Meeting
    Associate Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni will represent the government at Australia’s Meeting of Cultural Ministers in Adelaide this week. “This year’s meeting is special because New Zealand is expected to become an International Member of the Meeting of Cultural Ministers at this Australian forum,” Carmel Sepuloni said. “The meeting is an opportunity to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • 608 claims resolved by GCCRS in first year
    The Greater Christchurch Claims Resolution Service has resolved 608 insurance and EQC claims in its first year in operation, Minister Megan Woods has announced. The government service, which celebrates its first birthday today, provides a one stop shop to help Cantabrians still battling to get their homes repaired or rebuilt ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ economy in good shape
    Today’s topic, “trends and opportunities for the New Zealand economy,” is certainly one getting a great deal of commentary at the moment. Looking across the media landscape lately you’ll notice we aren’t the only ones having this discussion. There has been an increasing amount of attention paid to the outlook ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZTA to refocus on safety following review
    The Government is acting swiftly to strengthen NZTA’s regulatory role following a review into the Transport Agency, and Ministry of Transport’s performance as its monitor, Transport Minister Phil Twyford said today. An independent review by Martin Jenkins has found NZTA failed to properly regulate the transport sector under the previous ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Joint Cooperation Statement on Climate Change between the Netherlands and New Zealand
    The Netherlands and New Zealand have a long-standing and close relationship based on many shared interests and values. We value the rule of law, our democracies, and multilateralism.  And we value our environment – at home and globally. Right now there are major global challenges in all of these areas – ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government putting right Holidays Act underpayment in Health
    The Government is putting right a decade’s worth of underpayment to nurses, doctors and other health workers, says Health Minister Dr David Clark.  Initial sampling of District Health Boards payroll records has found that around $550-$650 million is owed to DHB staff to comply with the Holidays Act. It’s expected ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government accounts show strong economy
    A strong surplus and low debt show the economy is performing well, and means the Government is in a good position to meet the challenges of global economic uncertainty. “The surplus and low levels of debt show the economy is in good shape. This allows the Government to spend more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Ministers approve application to expand Waihi mine
    New applications from mining company OceanaGold to purchase land in Waihi for new tailings ponds associated with its gold mines have been approved. Minister of Finance Grant Robertson and Associate Minister of Finance David Parker considered the applications under the Overseas Investment Act. Earlier this year, applications from OceanaGold to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla launches with tribute to tangata whenua
    New Zealanders in Tūranganui-a-Kiwa / Poverty Bay will witness Māori, Pākehā and Pacific voyaging traditions come together today as the Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla assembles for the first time, Māori Crown Relations: Te Arawhiti Minister Kelvin Davis says. “Tuia 250 is a national commemoration and an opportunity for honest conversations ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Visit to advance trade agenda with Europe and the Commonwealth
    Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker leaves tomorrow for Dubai, London and Berlin for a series of meetings to advance New Zealand’s trade interests.  In Dubai he will visit New Zealand’s Pavilion at Expo 2020 where construction is underway.  There he will meet Minister of State for International Cooperation, Her ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More cancer drugs confirmed – even more on horizon
    Confirmation that PHARMAC will fund two new cancer drugs is further evidence of the good progress the Government is making to improve the treatment of New Zealand’s leading cause of death, Health Minister David Clark says. From 1 December PHARMAC will fund alectinib (Alecensa) for ALK positive advanced non-small cell ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago